Havoc (1925 film)

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Havoc
Havoc (1925) poster.jpg
Directed by Rowland V. Lee
Written by Edmund Goulding
Based onHavoc
by Henry Wall
Produced by William Fox
Starring Madge Bellamy
George O'Brien
Walter McGrail
Cinematography G.O. Post
Production
company
Distributed byFox Film
Release date
  • September 27, 1925 (1925-09-27)
Running time
9 reels
CountryUnited States
Language Silent (English intertitles)

Havoc is a 1925 American silent war drama film directed by Rowland V. Lee and starring Madge Bellamy, George O'Brien, and Walter McGrail. [1] [2]

Contents

Synopsis

In England before the outbreak of the First World War, two men court the same woman Violet Deering. She becomes engaged to Dick Chappel, but once he has gone off to the war commits herself to the other Roddy Dunton. On the Western Front Dunton joins Chappel with the British Army in the trenches. He persuades Chappel to take part in a reckless attack on the German lines, hoping he will be killed. Instead the brave Chappel is badly wounded. Later, full of remorse, Dunton commits suicide. Chappel returns home, where he nursed back to health by Dunton's sister Tessie.

Cast

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References

  1. Solomon p. 83
  2. Progressive Silent Film List: Havoc at silentera.com

Bibliography