Header (association football)

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Cristiano Ronaldo (9, white) heading the ball into the net for Real Madrid against Marseille in the 2009-10 UEFA Champions League. Salto de Cristiano Ronaldo.jpg
Cristiano Ronaldo (9, white) heading the ball into the net for Real Madrid against Marseille in the 2009–10 UEFA Champions League.
Abby Wambach heads the ball during a match against England in February, 2015. England Women's Vs USA (16365797348).jpg
Abby Wambach heads the ball during a match against England in February, 2015.

Header [1] is a technique that is used in association football to control the ball using the head to pass, shoot or clear. This can be done by standing, jumping or diving position. [2] Header is a common technique and is used by players in almost every match.

Association football Team field sport

Association football, more commonly known as football or soccer, is a team sport played with a spherical ball between two teams of eleven players. It is played by 250 million players in over 200 countries and dependencies, making it the world's most popular sport. The game is played on a rectangular field called a pitch with a goal at each end. The object of the game is to score by moving the ball beyond the goal line into the opposing goal.

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In general, a forward uses a header to score a goal while a defender usually uses a header to prevent the scoring of a goal by the opponent. A header is the only option when the ball is in air, because of the rule that a player can’t make contact with the ball using their hands. Most header goals are scored as a result of a cross or a corner. The playmaker passes the ball across the goal in the air, and the attacking player (either standing, jumping or diving position) strikes the ball with his head. [3]

Forward (association football) Association Football position played near the opponents goal

Forwards are the players on an association football team who play nearest to the opposing team's goal, and are therefore most responsible for scoring goals.

In the sport of association football, a defender is an outfield player whose primary role is to prevent the opposing team from scoring goals.

Cross (football) term in football

In association football, a cross is a medium- to-long-range pass from a wide area of the field towards the centre of the field near the opponent's goal. Specifically, the intention of a cross is to directly bring the ball into the box from an angle that allows the attacking forwards to more easily aim for goal with their head or feet. Crosses are generally airborne (floated) to clear nearby defenders, but can also be hit with force along the ground (drilled). It is a quick and effective move.

Footballers such as Marco van Basten, Fernando Torres, Cristiano Ronaldo, Andy Carroll, Harry Kane, Olivier Giroud, Gareth Bale, Javier Hernandez, Sergio Ramos, Peter Crouch, Giorgio Chiellini, Ali Daei and Abby Wambach [4] are players who are notable for their quality headers. [5] [6] [7]

Marco van Basten Dutch association football player and manager

Marcel "Marco" van Basten is a Dutch football manager and former professional football player, who played for Ajax and A.C. Milan, as well as the Netherlands national team, as a striker. He is regarded as one of the greatest players in the history of the sport. He scored 300 goals in a high-profile career, but played his last match in 1993 at age 28 due to an injury which forced his retirement two years later. He was later the head coach of Ajax and the Netherlands national team.

Fernando Torres Spanish association football player

Fernando José Torres Sanz is a Spanish professional footballer who plays as a striker for J1 League club Sagan Tosu and the Spain national team.

Cristiano Ronaldo Portuguese footballer

Cristiano Ronaldo dos Santos AveiroGOIH ComM is a Portuguese professional footballer who plays as a forward for Italian club Juventus and captains the Portugal national team. Often considered the best player in the world and widely regarded as one of the greatest players of all time, Ronaldo has a record-tying five Ballon d'Or awards, the most for a European player, and is the first player to win four European Golden Shoes. He has won 29 trophies in his career, including six league titles, five UEFA Champions League titles, one UEFA European Championship, and one UEFA Nations League. A prolific goalscorer, Ronaldo holds the records for most official goals scored in the UEFA Champions League (126), the UEFA European Championship (9), as well as those for most assists in the UEFA Champions League (34) and the UEFA European Championship (6). He has scored over 700 senior career goals for club and country.

Health risks

As with other high-impact sports such as boxing and American football, concerns over player safety resulting in chronic traumatic encephalopathy, due to the impact from both from the weight of the ball [8] and colliding with other players. [9] U.S. Soccer has taken actions in "eliminating heading for children 10 and under, and limiting the amount of heading in practice for children between the ages of 11 and 13." [10]

Concussions and other types of repetitive play-related head blows in American football have been shown to be the cause of chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE), which has led to player deaths and other debilitating symptoms after retirement, including memory loss, depression, anxiety, headaches, and sleep disturbances.

Chronic traumatic encephalopathy neurodegenerative disease caused by repeated head injuries

Chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) is a neurodegenerative disease caused by repeated head injuries. Symptoms may include behavioral problems, mood problems, and problems with thinking. Symptoms typically do not begin until years after the injuries. CTE often gets worse over time and can result in dementia. It is unclear if the risk of suicide is altered.

United States Soccer Federation official governing body of soccer in the United States

The United States Soccer Federation (USSF), commonly referred to as U.S. Soccer, is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization and the official governing body of the sport of soccer in the United States. With headquarters in Chicago, the FIFA member governs U.S. amateur and professional soccer, including the men's, women's, youth, beach soccer, futsal, and Paralympic national teams. U.S. Soccer sanctions referees and soccer tournaments for most soccer leagues in the United States. The U.S. Soccer Federation also administers and operates the U.S. Open Cup, which was first held in 1914.

See also

Related Research Articles

Field hockey team sport version of hockey played on grass or turf with sticks and a round ball

Field hockey is a team game of the hockey family. The game can be played on grass, water turf, artificial turf or synthetic field as well as an indoor board surface. Each team plays with eleven players, including the goalie. Players use sticks made out of wood, carbon fibre, fibre glass or a combination of carbon fibre and fibre glass in different quantities to hit a round, hard, plastic ball. The length of the stick is based on the player's individual height. Only one face of the stick is allowed to be used. Goalies often have a different kind of stick, however they can also use an ordinary field hockey stick. The specific goal-keeping sticks have another curve at the end of the stick, this is to give them more surface area to save the ball. The uniform consists of shin guards, shoes, shorts, a mouth guard and a jersey. Today, the game is played globally, mainly in parts of Western Europe, South Asia, Southern Africa, Australia, New Zealand, Argentina, and parts of the United States. Known simply as "hockey" in many territories, the term "field hockey" is used primarily in Canada and the United States where ice hockey is more popular. In Sweden, the term "landhockey" is used and to some degree also in Norway where it is governed by Norway's Bandy Association.

Goalkeeper sports position played in defense of ones own goal

In many team sports which involve scoring goals, the goalkeeper is a designated player charged with directly preventing the opposing team from scoring by intercepting shots at goal.

An own goal is an event in competitive goal-scoring sports where a player scores on their own side of the playing area rather than the one defended by the opponent. Own goals sometimes result from the opponent's defensive strength, as when the player is stopped in the scoring area, but can also happen by accident. Since own goals are often added to the opponent's score, they are often an embarrassing blunder for the scoring player, but in certain sports are occasionally done for strategic reasons.

Indoor soccer game derived from association football adapted for play in an indoor arena

Indoor soccer or arena soccer, is a game derived from association football adapted for play in a walled indoor arena. Indoor soccer, as it is most often known in the United States and Canada, was originally developed in these two countries as a way to play soccer during the winter months, when snow would make outdoor play difficult. In those countries, gymnasiums are adapted for indoor soccer play. In other countries the game is played in either indoor or outdoor arenas surrounded by walls, and is referred to by different names.

A penalty shoot-out is a method of determining which team is awarded victory in an association football match that cannot end in a draw, when the score is tied after the regulation playing time as well as extra time have expired. In a penalty shoot-out, each team takes turns shooting at goal from the penalty mark, with the goal only defended by the opposing team's goalkeeper. Each team has five shots which must be taken by different kickers; the team that makes more successful kicks is declared the victor. Shoot-outs finish as soon as one team has an insurmountable lead. If scores are level after five pairs of shots, the shootout progresses into additional "sudden-death" rounds. Balls successfully kicked into the goal during a shoot-out do not count as goals for the individual kickers or the team, and are tallied separately from the goals scored during normal play. Although the procedure for each individual kick in the shoot-out resembles that of a penalty kick, there are some differences. Most notably, neither the kicker nor any player other than the goalkeeper may play the ball again once it has been kicked.

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In association football, the back-pass rule prohibits the goalkeeper from handling the ball in most cases when it is passed to them by a team-mate. It is described in Law 12, Section 2 of the Laws of the Game.

Diving (association football) simulating a foul in association football

In association football, diving is an attempt by a player to gain an unfair advantage by falling to the ground and possibly feigning an injury, to give the impression that a foul has been committed. Dives are often used to exaggerate the amount of contact present in a challenge. Deciding on whether a player has dived is often very subjective, and one of the most controversial aspects of football discussion. Players do this so they can receive free kicks or penalty kicks, which can provide scoring opportunities, or so the opposing player receives a yellow or red card, giving their own team an advantage. Diving is also known as simulation, Schwalbe, and, in the U.S., flopping.

2001 UEFA Super Cup tournament

The 2001 UEFA Super Cup was a football match between German team Bayern Munich and English team Liverpool on 24 August 2001 at Stade Louis II, the annual UEFA Super Cup contested between the winners of the UEFA Champions League and UEFA Cup. Bayern were appearing in the Super Cup for the third time, their two previous appearances in 1975 and 1976 had ended in defeat. Liverpool were appearing in their fourth Super Cup, they won the competition in 1977, and lost twice in 1978 and 1984.

Association football headgear is worn by association football players to protect the head from injury. The headgear is designed to absorb the impact of blows to the head by external physical forces in order to reduce the chance of a concussion, a noteworthy example in international football being Czech goalkeeper Petr Čech from Arsenal. These collisions can occur from head to head, head to ground, head to goal post, or head to body extremity contact. It is flexible, not a rigid helmet.

In association football (soccer), a long ball is an attempt to move the ball a long distance down the field via one long aerial kick from either a goalkeeper or a defender directly to an attacking player, with the ball generally bypassing the midfield. Rather than arrive at the feet of the receiving attacking player, the attacker is expected to challenge the opposing defence in the air, with other attacking players and midfielders arriving to try and take possession of the ball if it breaks loose. In Continental Europe the style is called kick and rush. It is a technique that can be especially effective for a team with either fast or tall strikers. The long ball technique is also a through pass from distance in an effort to get the ball by the defensive line and create a foot race between striker and defender. While often derided as either boring or primitive, it can prove effective where players or weather conditions suit this style; in particular, it is an effective counter-attacking style of play in which some defenders can be caught off-guard.

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Shooting (association football) kicking technique in association football

Shooting is easily the most common way for goals to be scored. It is done using the feet; using the head, i.e. heading the ball, is the second most common way in which goals are scored.

Glossary of association football terms Wikimedia glossary list article

Association football was first codified in 1863 in England, although games that involved the kicking of a ball were evident considerably earlier. A large number of football-related terms have since emerged to describe various aspects of the sport and its culture.

In association football, the Panenka is a technique used in penalty kick-taking in which the taker, instead of kicking the ball to the left or right of the goalkeeper, gives a subtle touch underneath the ball, causing it to rise and fall within the centre of the goal, deceiving the goalkeeper who is counted on by the taker to have guessed a side and committed a dive away from the centre. It was first used by Czech player Antonín Panenka, who presented this technique to the world in the 1976 UEFA European Championship final, when he beat German goalkeeper Sepp Maier to claim the title for the Czechoslovakian national team. After its sensational debut in the tournament, the Panenka kick has been used on rare occasions and mostly by highly respected players who can deal with the consequences of missing such an attempt. This style of penalty kick is also called Il cucchiaio in the Italian-speaking world, cavadinha in Brazil and penal picado in Argentina.

A chip is a shot in which the ball is kicked from underneath with accuracy but with less than maximum force, to launch it high into the air in order either to pass it over the heads of opponents or to score a goal.

2018 FIFA World Cup Group B

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References

  1. "head‧er". ldoceonline. Retrieved 12 February 2016.
  2. "TECHNIQUE - HEADING" . Retrieved 14 February 2016.
  3. "Attacking Header". Talkfootball. Retrieved 14 February 2016.
  4. "Sergio Ramos' Champions League final header was so important for Real Madrid... Sportsmail looks back at 10 of the best". Daily Mail. 26 May 2014. Retrieved 12 February 2016.
  5. "Great headers in recent football" . Retrieved 12 February 2016.
  6. "Headers". Yahoo. Retrieved 12 February 2016.
  7. Jackson, Melanie (June 15, 2015). "The Header Heard Round The World". ESPN. Retrieved 6 March 2017.
  8. "Does Heading a Soccer Ball Cause Brain Damage?". Scientific American. 26 June 2014.
  9. "An Evidence-Based Discussion of Heading the Ball and Concussions in High School Soccer". JAMA Pediatrics. September 2015.
  10. "U.S. Soccer Provides Additional Information About Upcoming Player Safety Campaign". U.S. Soccer. 9 November 2015.