Herzog & de Meuron

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Herzog & de Meuron Architekten
AllianzArenaSunset.jpg
Practice information
Key architectsJacques Herzog
Pierre de Meuron
Christine Binswanger
Ascan Mergenthaler
Stefan Marbach
Michael Fischer
Jason Frantzen
Andreas Fries
Robert Hösl
Wim Walschap
Esther Zumsteg
Harry Gugger (former)
Founded1978
Location Basel, Switzerland
Berlin, Germany
New York City, USA
London, Great Britain
Hong Kong, Hong Kong
Significant works and honors
Buildings Allianz Arena
M. H. de Young Museum
Beijing National Stadium
Awards Pritzker Prize (2001)
Prix de l'Équerre d'Argent (2001)
Royal Gold Medal (2007)
Schock Prize (1999)
Stirling Prize (2003)
Website
www.herzogdemeuron.com

Herzog & de Meuron Basel Ltd., [1] or Herzog & de Meuron Architekten, BSA/SIA/ETH (HdM),[ citation needed ] is a Swiss architecture firm with its head office in Basel, Switzerland. [1] The careers of founders and senior partners Jacques Herzog (born 19 April 1950) and Pierre de Meuron (born 8 May 1950) closely paralleled one another, with both attending the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology (ETH) in Zurich. They are perhaps best known for their conversion of the giant Bankside Power Station in London to the new home of Tate Modern. Jacques Herzog and Pierre de Meuron have been visiting professors at the Harvard University Graduate School of Design since 1994 and professors at ETH Zürich since 1999.

Switzerland federal republic in Central Europe

Switzerland, officially the Swiss Confederation, is a country situated in western, central and southern Europe. It consists of 26 cantons, and the city of Bern is the seat of the federal authorities. The sovereign state is a federal republic bordered by Italy to the south, France to the west, Germany to the north, and Austria and Liechtenstein to the east. Switzerland is a landlocked country geographically divided between the Alps, the Swiss Plateau and the Jura, spanning a total area of 41,285 km2 (15,940 sq mi). While the Alps occupy the greater part of the territory, the Swiss population of approximately 8.5 million people is concentrated mostly on the plateau, where the largest cities are to be found: among them are the two global cities and economic centres Zürich and Geneva.

Architecture both the process and product of planning, designing and construction

Architecture is both the process and the product of planning, designing, and constructing buildings or any other structures. Architectural works, in the material form of buildings, are often perceived as cultural symbols and as works of art. Historical civilizations are often identified with their surviving architectural achievements.

Contents

History

Jacques Herzog Herzog & de Meuron Myths and Collaborations over Time (9805121736).jpg
Jacques Herzog

Herzog & de Meuron was founded in Basel in 1978. [2] In 2001, Herzog & de Meuron were awarded the Pritzker Prize, the highest of honours in architecture. Jury chairman J. Carter Brown commented, "One is hard put to think of any architects in history that have addressed the integument of architecture with greater imagination and virtuosity." This was in reference to HdM's innovative use of exterior materials and treatments, such as silkscreened glass. Architecture critic and Pritzker juror Ada Louise Huxtable summarized HdM's approach concisely: "They refine the traditions of modernism to elemental simplicity, while transforming materials and surfaces through the exploration of new treatments and techniques." [3] In 2006, The New York Times Magazine called them "one of the most admired architecture firms in the world." [4]

John Carter Brown III, director of the U.S. National Gallery of Art from 1969 to 1992 and a leading figure in American intellectual life. Under Brown's direction, the National Gallery became one of the leading art museums in the United States, if not the world. He was known as a champion of the arts and public access to art at a time of decreased public spending on the humanities.

Ada Louise Huxtable American architecture writer

Ada Louise Huxtable was an architecture critic and writer on architecture. In 1970 she was awarded the first ever Pulitzer Prize for Criticism. Architecture critic Paul Goldberger, also a Pulitzer Prize-winner (1984) for architectural criticism, said in 1996: "Before Ada Louise Huxtable, architecture was not a part of the public dialogue." "She was a great lover of cities, a great preservationist and the central planet around which every other critic revolved," said architect Robert A. M. Stern, dean of the Yale University School of Architecture.

<i>The New York Times Magazine</i>

The New York Times Magazine is a Sunday magazine supplement included with the Sunday edition of The New York Times. It is host to feature articles longer than those typically in the newspaper and has attracted many notable contributors. The magazine is also noted for its photography, especially relating to fashion and style.

Style

HdM's early works were reductivist pieces of modernity that registered on the same level as the minimalist art of Donald Judd.[ citation needed ] However, their recent work at Prada Tokyo, the Barcelona Forum Building and the Beijing National Stadium for the 2008 Olympic Games, suggest a changing attitude. [4] The shapes and forms of some of the works suggest art glass and objects d'art that one would see on a coffee table, like an art deco ashtray or quirky container for chocolates - a building becomes a blown-up version of desk art because the computer can do it, mimic the plasticity of the medium, and make it possible as a feat of engineering.

Donald Judd American artist

Donald Judd was an American artist associated with minimalism. In his work, Judd sought autonomy and clarity for the constructed object and the space created by it, ultimately achieving a rigorously democratic presentation without compositional hierarchy. It created an outpouring of seemingly effervescent works that defied the term "minimalism". Nevertheless, he is generally considered the leading international exponent of "minimalism," and its most important theoretician through such seminal writings as "Specific Objects" (1964). Judd voices his unorthodox perception of minimalism in Arts Yearbook 8, where he asserts; "The new three dimensional work doesn't constitute a movement, school, or style. The common aspects are too general and too little common to define a movement. The differences are greater than the similarities" Through his work Judd shines light on the profound effect on new three dimensional by specificity and generality.

Prada Italian luxury fashion house

Prada S.p.A. is an Italian luxury fashion house, specializing in leather handbags, travel accessories, shoes, ready-to-wear, perfumes and other fashion accessories, founded in 1913 by Mario Prada.

Tokyo Metropolis in Kantō

Tokyo, officially Tokyo Metropolis, one of the 47 prefectures of Japan, has served as the Japanese capital since 1869. As of 2018, the Greater Tokyo Area ranked as the most populous metropolitan area in the world. The urban area houses the seat of the Emperor of Japan, of the Japanese government and of the National Diet. Tokyo forms part of the Kantō region on the southeastern side of Japan's main island, Honshu, and includes the Izu Islands and Ogasawara Islands. Tokyo was formerly named Edo when Shōgun Tokugawa Ieyasu made the city his headquarters in 1603. It became the capital after Emperor Meiji moved his seat to the city from Kyoto in 1868; at that time Edo was renamed Tokyo. Tokyo Metropolis formed in 1943 from the merger of the former Tokyo Prefecture and the city of Tokyo. Tokyo is often referred to as a city but is officially known and governed as a "metropolitan prefecture", which differs from and combines elements of a city and a prefecture, a characteristic unique to Tokyo.

HdM's commitment of articulation through materiality is a common thread through all their projects.[ clarification needed ] Their formal gestures have generally progressed from the purist simplicity of rectangular forms to more complex and dynamic geometries. The architects often cite Joseph Beuys as an enduring artistic inspiration and collaborate with different artists on each architectural project. Their success can be attributed to their skills in revealing unfamiliar or unknown relationships by utilizing innovative materials.[ citation needed ]

Joseph Beuys German visual artist

Joseph Beuys was a German Fluxus, happening, and performance artist as well as a painter, sculptor, installation artist, graphic artist, art theorist, and pedagogue.

Artistic inspiration emotion

Inspiration is an unconscious burst of creativity in a literary, musical, or other artistic endeavour. The concept has origins in both Hellenism and Hebraism. The Greeks believed that inspiration or "enthusiasm" came from the muses, as well as the gods Apollo and Dionysus. Similarly, in the Ancient Norse religions, inspiration derives from the gods, such as Odin. Inspiration is also a divine matter in Hebrew poetics. In the Book of Amos the prophet speaks of being overwhelmed by God's voice and compelled to speak. In Christianity, inspiration is a gift of the Holy Spirit.

Selected projects

Prada Store in Tokyo PRADA BOUTIQUE AOYAMA.jpg
Prada Store in Tokyo
IKMZ, Cottbus, Brandenburg IKMZ.jpg
IKMZ, Cottbus, Brandenburg
Walker Art Center, Minneapolis, Minnesota WalkerArt.jpg
Walker Art Center, Minneapolis, Minnesota
BBVA headquarters in Madrid, Spain (2009-2015) BBVA head offices (Madrid) 08.jpg
BBVA headquarters in Madrid, Spain (2009-2015)
Elbphilharmonie, HafenCity in Hamburg (2007-2016) Elbphilharmonie (Hamburg, Germany) in 2016, by Robert Katzki.jpg
Elbphilharmonie, HafenCity in Hamburg (2007–2016)
Completed
Goetz Collection architectural structure

The Goetz Collection is a private collection of contemporary art in Munich, Germany. It opened in 1992. The collection is owned and continually being enlarged by the former gallery dealer Ingvild Goetz, who presents the collection to the public in a series of themed exhibitions in a purpose built museum. Rather than taking an encyclopedic view, the collection focuses on developing particular artists.

Leymen Commune in Grand Est, France

Leymen is a commune in the Haut-Rhin department in Alsace in north-eastern France. The commune is served by Leymen station, on line 10 of the Basel tramway between Rodersdorf and Flüh, and until December 2017 was the only such station to be located on French soil.

Dominus Estate, is a California wine estate producing Bordeaux style blends, owned by Christian Moueix. The winery is located in Yountville within the Napa Valley AVA.

Current
Berggruen Institute organization

The Berggruen Institute is an independent, non-partisan think tank which develops ideas to shape political and social institutions.

Plaza de España (Santa Cruz de Tenerife) square in Tenerife, Spain

Plaza de España, is the largest square in the city of Santa Cruz de Tenerife and the Canary Islands (Spain). The square is located in the centre of town, 1.4 km north of the Auditorio de Tenerife.

56 Leonard Street skyscraper in New York City

56 Leonard Street is an 821-foot-tall (250 m), 57-story skyscraper on Leonard Street in the neighborhood of Tribeca in Manhattan, New York City, United States. The building was designed by the Swiss architecture firm Herzog & de Meuron, which describes the building as "houses stacked in the sky." It is the tallest structure in Tribeca.

Awards

Related Research Articles

Culture of Switzerland culture of an area

Switzerland lies at the crossroads of several major European cultures. Three of the continent's major languages, German, French and Italian, are national languages of Switzerland, along with Romansh, spoken by a small minority. Therefore, Swiss culture is characterized by diversity, which is reflected in a wide range of traditional customs. The 26 cantons also account for the large cultural diversity.

The year 2001 in architecture involved some significant architectural events and new buildings.

The year 2000 in architecture involved some significant architectural events and new buildings.

The year 2007 in architecture involved some significant architectural events and new buildings.

Peter Zumthor Swiss architect

Peter Zumthor is a Swiss architect whose work is frequently described as uncompromising and minimalist. Though managing a relatively small firm, he is the winner of the 2009 Pritzker Prize and 2013 RIBA Royal Gold Medal.

Serpentine Galleries Art gallery in Hyde Park, London

The Serpentine Galleries are two contemporary art galleries in Kensington Gardens, Hyde Park, Central London. Comprising the Serpentine Gallery and the Serpentine Sackler Gallery, they are within five minutes' walk of each other, linked by the bridge over the Serpentine Lake from which the galleries get their names. Their exhibitions, architecture, education and public programmes attract up to 1.2 million visitors a year. Admission to both galleries is free.

Contemporary architecture broad range of styles of recently built structures

Contemporary architecture is the architecture of the 21st century. No single style is dominant; contemporary architects are working in a dozen different styles, from postmodernism and high-tech architecture to highly conceptual and expressive styles, resembling sculpture on an enormous scale. The different styles and approaches have in common the use of very advanced technology and modern building materials, such as Tube structure which allows construction of the buildings that are taller, lighter and stronger than those in the 20th century, and the use of new techniques of computer-aided design, which allow buildings to be designed and modeled on computers in three dimensions, and constructed with more precision and speed.

Eduardo Souto de Moura Portuguese architect

Eduardo Elísio Machado Souto de Moura (Portuguese pronunciation: [eˈðwaɾðu ˈsowtu dɨ ˈmowɾɐ]; born 25 July 1952, better known as Eduardo Souto de Moura, is a Portuguese architect who was the recipient of the Pritzker Architecture Prize in 2011 and the Wolf Prize in Arts in 2013. Along with Fernando Távora and Álvaro Siza, he is one of the alumni of the Porto School of Architecture, where he was appointed a Professor.

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ETH Zurich Faculty of Architecture

Founded in 1854, the Department of Architecture (D-ARCH) at ETH Zurich is an architecture school of worldwide reputation, providing education in the fields of architecture, landscape architecture, urban planning, and urban design. It has around 1,900 students and 350 staff, and an annual budget of CHF 40 million.

Karim Noureldin is a Swiss visual artist.

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The World Architecture Survey was conducted in 2010 by Vanity Fair, to determine the most important works of contemporary architecture. 52 leading architects, teachers, and critics, including several Pritzker Prize winners and deans of major architecture schools were asked for their opinion.

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The year 2012 in architecture involved some significant architectural events and new buildings.

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Christian Kerez is a Swiss architect.

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References

  1. 1 2 "Credits." Herzog & de Meuron. Retrieved on 11 October 2012. "Herzog & de Meuron Basel Ltd. Rheinschanze 6 4056 Basel, Switzerland"
  2. "Biography of the architect: Herzog & de Meuron". Floornature.com (in Italian). Retrieved 2017-10-16.
  3. Jackie Craven. "Master Architects". About.com. Retrieved 2007-03-15.
  4. 1 2 Arthur Lubow (21 May 2006). "The China Syndrome". The New York Times Magazine . Retrieved 2007-03-15.subscription required
  5. "Rudin House". wikiarquitectura. Retrieved 2017-12-20.
  6. "40 Bond in Detail - Triple Mint". Archived from the original on March 4, 2014. Retrieved 2014-03-07.
  7. "Serpentine Gallery Pavilion 2012 by Herzog & de Meuron and Ai Weiwei". Serpentine Galleries. Retrieved 2017-10-16.
  8. "Parrish Art Museum - Domus" . Retrieved 2016-02-10.
  9. "327 FELTRINELLI PORTA VOLTA - HERZOG & DE MEURON". www.herzogdemeuron.com. Retrieved 6 April 2018.
  10. Curwen, Thomas. "On his Santa Monica mountaintop, a billionaire envisions lofty thoughts on politics and culture", Los Angeles Times, April 30, 2016.
  11. "Herzog & de Meuron’s design for new Vancouver Art Gallery unveiled." Canadian Architect, September 29, 2015. Accessed September 29, 2015.
  12. "Project Teams" Tai Kwun, January 22, 2017. Accessed January 22, 2017.