IEEE Cledo Brunetti Award

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IEEE Cledo Brunetti Award
Awarded forOutstanding contributions to nanotechnology and miniaturization in the electronics arts
Sponsored by IEEE
First awarded1975
Website IEEE Cledo Brunetti Award

The IEEE Cledo Brunetti Award is an award is presented for outstanding contributions to nanotechnology and miniaturization in the electronics arts. It may be presented to an individual or a team of up to three. The award was established in 1975 by the IEEE Board of Directors.

Nanotechnology ("nanotech") is manipulation of matter on an atomic, molecular, and supramolecular scale. The earliest, widespread description of nanotechnology referred to the particular technological goal of precisely manipulating atoms and molecules for fabrication of macroscale products, also now referred to as molecular nanotechnology. A more generalized description of nanotechnology was subsequently established by the National Nanotechnology Initiative, which defines nanotechnology as the manipulation of matter with at least one dimension sized from 1 to 100 nanometers. This definition reflects the fact that quantum mechanical effects are important at this quantum-realm scale, and so the definition shifted from a particular technological goal to a research category inclusive of all types of research and technologies that deal with the special properties of matter which occur below the given size threshold. It is therefore common to see the plural form "nanotechnologies" as well as "nanoscale technologies" to refer to the broad range of research and applications whose common trait is size. Because of the variety of potential applications, governments have invested billions of dollars in nanotechnology research. Through 2012, the USA has invested $3.7 billion using its National Nanotechnology Initiative, the European Union has invested $1.2 billion, and Japan has invested $750 million.

Miniaturization trend to manufacture ever smaller products and devices

Miniaturization is the trend to manufacture ever smaller mechanical, optical and electronic products and devices. Examples include miniaturization of mobile phones, computers and vehicle engine downsizing. In electronics, Moore's law, which was named after Intel co-founder Gordon Moore, predicted that the number of transistors on an integrated circuit for minimum component cost doubles every 18 months. This enables processors to be built in smaller sizes.

Contents

Recipients of this award receive bronze medal, a certificate and honorarium.

Basis for judging: In the evaluation process, the following criteria are considered: innovation, development, social value, uniqueness of concept, other technical accomplishments, and the quality of the nomination.

Nomination deadline: 31 January

Notification: Recipients are typically approved during the June IEEE Board of Directors meeting, usually held towards the end of the month. Recipients and their nominators will be notified following the meeting. Subsequently, the nominators of unsuccessful candidates will be notified of the status of their nomination.

Presentation: IEEE policy requires that its awards be presented at major IEEE events that are in keeping with the nature of the award and the cited achievement.

Recipients

Siegfried Selberherr Austrian University Professor and scientist

Siegfried Selberherr is an Austrian scientist in the field of microelectronics. He is a professor at the Institute for Microelectronics of the Technische Universität Wien . His primary research interest is in modeling and simulation of physical phenomena in the field of microelectronics.

Burn-Jeng Lin is a Taiwanese engineer.

Supriyo Datta American engineer

Supriyo Datta is an Indian born American researcher and author. A leading figure in the modeling and understanding of nano-scale electronic conduction, he has been called "one of the most original thinkers in the field of nanoscale electronics." He is currently the Thomas Duncan Distinguished professor at the School of Electrical Engineering at Purdue University. A recipient of the Frederick Emmons Terman Award from the American Society of Engineering Education in 1994, and the Presidential Young Investigator Award from the National Science Foundation in 1984, he is a Fellow of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers, the Institute of Physics and the American Physical Society. He was elected to the National Academy of Engineering in 2012.

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References

  1. 1 2 "IEEE CLEDO BRUNETTI AWARD RECIPIENTS" (PDF). IEEE . Retrieved 2018-08-04.