IEEE Jack S. Kilby Signal Processing Medal

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IEEE Jack S. Kilby Signal Processing Medal
Awarded forOutstanding achievements in signal processing
Presented by Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers
First awarded1997
Website IEEE Jack S. Kilby Signal Processing Medal

The IEEE Jack S. Kilby Signal Processing Medal is presented "for outstanding achievements in signal processing" theory, technology or commerce. The recipients of this award will receive a gold medal, together with a replica in bronze, a certificate and an honorarium. [1]

The award was established in 1995 by the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE) and is sponsored by Texas Instruments Inc. It is named after Jack S. Kilby, whose innovation like the co-invention of the integrated circuit was fundamental for the signal processor and related digital signal processing development. The award may be presented to an individual or a group up to three in number. [1]

Nomination deadline: 1 July

Notification: Recipients are typically approved during the November IEEE Board of Directors meeting. Recipients and their nominators will be notified following the meeting. Then the nominators of unsuccessful candidates will be notified of the status of their nomination.

Presentation: At the annual IEEE Honors Ceremony

Recipients

The following people have received the IEEE Jack S. Kilby Signal Processing Medal: [2] [3]

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References

  1. 1 2 "IEEE Jack S. Kilby Signal Processing Medal". IEEE . Retrieved March 1, 2011.
  2. "IEEE Jack S. Kilby Signal Processing Medal Recipients" (PDF). IEEE . Retrieved December 3, 2019.
  3. "IEEE Jack S. Kilby Signal Processing Medal Recipients – Bios". IEEE . Retrieved December 3, 2019.
  4. "Harry L. Van Trees – Engineering and Technology History Wiki". Ethw.org. 2016-03-31. Retrieved 2017-03-12.
  5. "G. Clifford Carter – Engineering and Technology History Wiki". Ethw.org. 2016-03-31. Retrieved 2017-03-12.
  6. "Oral-History:James Kaiser – Engineering and Technology History Wiki". Ethw.org. Retrieved 2017-03-12.
  7. "Oral-History:Ben Gold – Engineering and Technology History Wiki". Ethw.org. Retrieved 2017-03-12.
  8. "Oral-History:Charles Rader – Engineering and Technology History Wiki". Ethw.org. Retrieved 2017-03-12.