Jim Weatherall

Last updated
Jim Weatherall
No. 77, 72, 74
Born:(1929-10-26)October 26, 1929
Graham, Texas
Died:August 2, 1992(1992-08-02) (aged 62)
Oklahoma City, Oklahoma
Career information
CFL status American
Position(s) DT
Height6 ft 4 in (193 cm)
Weight245 lb (111 kg)
College Oklahoma
NFL draft 1952 / Round: 2 / Pick: 17
Drafted by Philadelphia Eagles
Career history
As player
1954 Edmonton Eskimos (WIFU)
1955–1957 Philadelphia Eagles
1958 Washington Redskins
1959–1960 Detroit Lions
Career highlights and awards
  • Grey Cup champion (1954)
Pro Bowls 2 (1955–56)
Awards1951 Outland Trophy
Career stats

James Preston Weatherall (October 26, 1929 – August 2, 1992) was an American football defensive tackle in the National Football League (NFL) for the Philadelphia Eagles, Washington Redskins, and the Detroit Lions. He also played in the Western Interprovincial Football Union (WIFU) for the Edmonton Eskimos. Weatherall played college football at the University of Oklahoma and was drafted in the second round of the 1952 NFL Draft. He was inducted into the College Football Hall of Fame in 1992.

Contents

Early life

Weatherall grew up in Graham, Texas, and attended White Deer High School in White Deer, Texas. [1]

College career

Weatherall attended and played college football at the University of Oklahoma, where he was consensus All-America in 1950, unanimous All-America in 1951, and won the Outland Trophy in 1951. [1] He lettered four years at Oklahoma and was the 1951 co-captain. Weatherall was also a placekicker and kicked 37 extra points in 1950 (fifth in the nation) and 39 in 1951 (second in the nation). [1] During his college career, Oklahoma had a 39–4 record with a 31-game winning streak and a national championship in 1950. [1] While at Oklahoma, Weatherall also wrestled. [2]

He was a member of the Naval Reserve Officer Training Corps and graduated with a degree in business administration. [1]

Marines

Weatherall was in the Marines from 1952 to 1954. [1] [2]

Professional career

Weatherall had a nine-year career in which he played in the Western Interprovincial Football Union for the Edmonton Eskimos, and in the National Football League for the Philadelphia Eagles, Washington Redskins, and the Detroit Lions.

After football

After his professional career, Weatherall owned an oil-well servicing company in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma. [2]

Personal life

Weatherall had a wife, Sugar; two sons, Tracy and Clay; a daughter, Jamie; one grandson (born) Randy Clay Weatherall and one granddaughter Lacey Weatherall Andrews and a nephew. [2]

Related Research Articles

Alex Wojciechowicz American football player (1915–1992)

Alexander Francis "Wojie" Wojciechowicz was an American football player from 1935 to 1950. He was a two-way player who played at center on offense and at linebacker on defense. He has been inducted into both the College and Pro Football Halls of Fame, was a founder and the first president of the NFL Alumni Association, and was the third player to receive the Order of the Leather Helmet.

Billy Vessels American gridiron football player (1931–2001)

Billy Dale Vessels was a gridiron football player. He played college football at the University of Oklahoma and won the Heisman Trophy in 1952. Vessels went on to play professional football with the National Football League's Baltimore Colts and the Western Interprovincial Football Union's Edmonton Eskimos.

Lou Creekmur American football player (1927–2009)

Louis Creekmur was an American football offensive lineman. He was inducted into the Pro Football Hall of Fame in 1996.

Jackie Parker American gridiron football player and coach (1932–2006)

John Dickerson "Jackie" Parker was an American gridiron football player and coach. He was an All-American in college football and an outstanding professional football player in the Canadian Football League at the running back, quarterback, defensive back, and kicker positions. He is primarily known for his play with the Edmonton Eskimos. Later in his career, he played for the Toronto Argonauts and the BC Lions, and coached the Eskimos and Lions after his playing career ended.

Dick Alban American football player (1929–2016)

Richard Herbert Alban was an American football defensive back who played eight seasons for the Washington Redskins and Pittsburgh Steelers in the National Football League (NFL). Alban played college football at Northwestern University, where he was used at halfback and on defense.

Jim Ricca American football player (1927–2007)

James Emanuel "Big Jim" Ricca was a professional American football defensive tackle and guard for six seasons in the National Football League for the Washington Redskins, Philadelphia Eagles and Detroit Lions.

Jack Jacobs, nicknamed "Indian Jack", was an American and Canadian football player in the National Football League and Western Interprovincial Football Union. He was a charter member of the Canadian Football Hall of Fame, inducted in 1963.

Johnny Bright American gridiron football player (1930–1983)

John Dee Bright was an American professional football player in the Canadian Football League. He played college football at Drake University. He is a member of the Canadian Football Hall of Fame, the National Football Foundation's College Football Hall of Fame, the Missouri Valley Conference Hall of Fame, the Edmonton Eskimos Wall of Honour, the Alberta Sports Hall of Fame, and the Des Moines Register's Iowa Sports Hall of Fame.

Tom Scott is a former Canadian Football League receiver for the Winnipeg Blue Bombers, Edmonton Eskimos and Calgary Stampeders. He was drafted in the 1973 NFL Draft by the Detroit Lions. In an 11-year professional career from 1974–1984, he caught 649 passes for 10,837 yards and 88 touchdowns. Scott was a part of five Grey Cup winning teams with the Eskimos. He is a member of the Canadian Football Hall of Fame, where he was inducted in 1998.

Andrew Geza Farkas was an American football fullback in the National Football League (NFL) for the Washington Redskins and the Detroit Lions.

Bobby Walston American football player, coach, and administrator (1928–1987)

Robert Harold Walston was an American football wide receiver and placekicker in the NFL for the Philadelphia Eagles. He played college football at the University of Georgia and was drafted in the 14th round of the 1951 NFL Draft. From 1966 to 1967, he coached receivers and kickers for the Miami Dolphins.

Dick Stanfel American football player and coach (1927–2015)

Richard Anthony Stanfel was an American football player and coach with a college and professional career spanning more than 50 years from 1948 to 1999. He was inducted into the Pro Football Hall of Fame as a player in 2016. He was also named to the National Football League (NFL) 1950s All-Decade Team.

Henry LeRoy Zimmerman Jr. was an American football player who played running back and quarterback in the National Football League (NFL) from 1940 to 1948. Afterwards, he played professional fast-pitch softball for 26 years, during which he revolutionized pitching.

Dan Yochum was an American professional football player who was an offensive lineman for the Montreal Alouettes from 1972–1980 and the Edmonton Eskimos in 1980 of the Canadian Football League (CFL). He won three Grey Cups for the Alouettes and was a four-time CFL All-Star.

Jim Martin (American football) American football player (1924–2002)

James Richard "Jungle Jim" Martin was an American football guard, linebacker and placekicker who played fourteen seasons in the National Football League (NFL) in the 1950s and 1960s, mainly for the Detroit Lions. He was selected to the Pro Bowl, the NFL's all-star game, after the 1961 season, and went on to be an assistant coach after his playing career. He was an All-American at the University of Notre Dame and was inducted into the College Football Hall of Fame in 1995.

LaVern Earl "Torgy" Torgeson was an American football player and coach. He played college football for Washington State from 1948 through 1950. Torgeson played professionally in the National Football League (NFL) for seven seasons, principally as a linebacker, for the Detroit Lions from 1951 to 1954 and for the Washington Redskins from 1955 to 1957.

Lew Carpenter American football player and coach (1932–2010)

Lewis Glen Carpenter was an American football player and coach. He played college football for the University of Arkansas and professionally for ten seasons in the National Football League (NFL) as a halfback and fullback with the Detroit Lions, Cleveland Browns, and Green Bay Packers. He played on three NFL Championship teams, with Detroit in 1953 and with Green Bay in 1961 and 1962. After his playing career ended, Carpenter spent 31 years as an assistant coach in the NFL with the Minnesota Vikings (1964–1966), Atlanta Falcons (1967–1968), Washington Redskins (1969), St. Louis Cardinals (1970–1972), Houston Oilers (1970–1974), Green Bay Packers (1975–1985), Detroit Lions (1987–1988), and Philadelphia Eagles (1990–1994). Carpenter also coached the Frankfurt Galaxy of the World League of American Football in 1996 and at Southwest Texas State University. He concluded his 47 years of playing and coaching football at the end of the 1996 season. Scientific tests on his brain diagnosed post-mortem that he had an advanced case of chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE).

Raymond George American football player and coach (1918–1995)

Raymond Edward George was an American football player and coach. He played college football at the University of Southern California (USC) and professionally in the National Football League (NFL) with the Detroit Lions and Philadelphia Eagles. George was the head football coach at Texas A&M University from 1951 to 1953, compiling a record of 12–14–4. He also served three stints as an assistant football coach at his alma mater, USC.

Willie Leon Manley was an American football player and coach. He was born in Hollis, Oklahoma. He lettered for three seasons as guard at the University of Oklahoma from 1947 to 1949. He was selected in the 1950 NFL Draft by the Green Bay Packers and was on their roster in 1950 and 1951. Later from 1953 to '54 he played for the Edmonton Eskimos of the Western Interprovincial Football Union. After his playing career was through Manley pursued a coaching career and was a longtime assistant under Darrell Royal at Texas, first as offensive line coach and later succeeding Don Breaux as offensive coordinator. Royal was Manley's childhood friend and later a high school and college teammate.

William J. Walker is an American former football and baseball player. He attended the University of Maryland, College Park where he played college football as an end and baseball as an outfielder. Wire services twice named Walker to All-America football second teams and he was also selected to an All-Atlantic Coast Conference (ACC) team three years. Walker was named to the All-ACC baseball team once as well. He was selected by the Detroit Lions in the eighth round of the 1955 NFL Draft, but instead signed with the Edmonton Eskimos of the Western Interprovincial Football Union.

References

  1. 1 2 3 4 5 6 "Jim Weatherall". College Football Hall of Fame . Football Foundation. Retrieved 2009-01-15.
  2. 1 2 3 4 "Jim Weatherall, 62, Star Football Lineman". New York Times . August 4, 1992. Retrieved 2009-01-15.