T

Last updated

T
T t
(See below)
T cursiva.gif
Usage
Writing system Latin script
Type Alphabetic and Logographic
Language of origin Latin language
Phonetic usage[ t ]
[ ]
[ ]
[ d ]
[ ]
[ t͡ʃ ]
[ ɾ ]
[ ʔ ]
/t/
Unicode valueU+0054, U+0074
Alphabetical position20
History
Development
Time period~-700 to present
Descendants  Th (digraph)
 
 
 
  Ŧ
  Ť
  Ţ
 
Sisters 𐍄
Т
Ҭ
Ћ
Ҵ
ת
ت
ܬ

ة

𐎚
𐎙


Տ տ
Ց ց




Variations(See below)
Other
Other letters commonly used with t(x), th, tzsch

T or t is the 20th letter in the modern English alphabet and the ISO basic Latin alphabet. Its name in English is tee (pronounced /ˈt/ ), plural tees. [1] It is derived from the Semitic letters taw (ת, ܬ, ت) via the Greek letter τ (tau). In English, it is most commonly used to represent the voiceless alveolar plosive, a sound it also denotes in the International Phonetic Alphabet. It is the most commonly used consonant and the second most common letter in English-language texts. [2]

Contents

History

Phoenician
Taw
Etruscan
T
Greek
Tau
Proto-semiticT-01.svg EtruscanT-01.svg Tau uc lc.svg

Taw was the last letter of the Western Semitic and Hebrew alphabets. The sound value of Semitic Taw, Greek alphabet Tαυ (Tau), Old Italic and Latin T has remained fairly constant, representing [ t ] in each of these; and it has also kept its original basic shape in most of these alphabets.

Use in writing systems

English

In English, t usually denotes the voiceless alveolar plosive (International Phonetic Alphabet and X-SAMPA: /t/), as in tart, tee, or ties, often with aspiration at the beginnings of words or before stressed vowels.

The digraph ti often corresponds to the sound /ʃ/ (a voiceless palato-alveolar sibilant) word-medially when followed by a vowel, as in nation, ratio, negotiation, and Croatia.

The letter t corresponds to the affricate /t͡ʃ/ in some words as a result of yod-coalescence (for example, in words ending in "-ture", such as future).

A common digraph is th, which usually represents a dental fricative, but occasionally represents /t/ (as in Thomas and thyme.)

Other languages

In the orthographies of other languages, t is often used for /t/, the voiceless dental plosive /t̪/ or similar sounds.

Other systems

In the International Phonetic Alphabet, t denotes the voiceless alveolar plosive.

Ancestors and siblings in other alphabets

Derived signs, symbols and abbreviations

Computing codes

CharacterTt
Unicode nameLATIN CAPITAL LETTER T   LATIN SMALL LETTER T
Encodingsdecimalhexdecimalhex
Unicode 84U+0054116U+0074
UTF-8 845411674
Numeric character reference TTtt
EBCDIC family227E3163A3
ASCII 1845411674
1Also for encodings based on ASCII, including the DOS, Windows, ISO-8859 and Macintosh families of encodings.

Other representations

NATO phonetic Morse code
Tango
ICS Tango.svg

Semaphore Tango.svg

Sign language T.svg Braille T.svg
Signal flag Flag semaphore American manual alphabet (ASL fingerspelling) Braille dots-2345
Unified English Braille

Related Research Articles

A First letter of the Latin alphabet

A or a is the first letter and the first vowel letter of the modern English alphabet and the ISO basic Latin alphabet. Its name in English is a, plural aes. It is similar in shape to the Ancient Greek letter alpha, from which it derives. The uppercase version consists of the two slanting sides of a triangle, crossed in the middle by a horizontal bar. The lowercase version can be written in two forms: the double-storey a and single-storey ɑ. The latter is commonly used in handwriting and fonts based on it, especially fonts intended to be read by children, and is also found in italic type.

D Letter of the Latin alphabet

D or d is the fourth letter of the modern English alphabet and the ISO basic Latin alphabet. Its name in English is dee, plural dees.

E letter of the Latin alphabet

E or e is the fifth letter and the second vowel letter in the modern English alphabet and the ISO basic Latin alphabet. Its name in English is e, plural ees. It is the most commonly used letter in many languages, including Czech, Danish, Dutch, English, French, German, Hungarian, Latin, Latvian, Norwegian, Spanish, and Swedish.

F Letter of the Latin alphabet

F or f is the sixth letter in the modern English alphabet and the ISO basic Latin alphabet. Its name in English is ef, plural efs.

G Letter of the Latin alphabet

G or g is the seventh letter of the ISO basic Latin alphabet. Its name in English is gee, plural gees.

H Letter of the Latin alphabet

H or h is the eighth letter in the ISO basic Latin alphabet. Its name in English is aitch, or regionally haitch.

K Eleventh letter of the Latin alphabet

K is the eleventh letter of the modern English alphabet and the ISO basic Latin alphabet. Its name in English is kay, plural kays. The letter K usually represents the voiceless velar plosive.

M Letter in the Latin alphabet

M or m is the thirteenth letter of the modern English alphabet and the ISO basic Latin alphabet. Its name in English is em, plural ems.

N Letter of the Latin Alphabet

N or n is the fourteenth letter in the modern English alphabet and the ISO basic Latin alphabet. Its name in English is en, plural ens.

O Letter of the Latin alphabet

O or o is the 15th letter in the ISO basic Latin alphabet and the fourth vowel letter in the modern English alphabet. Its name in English is o, plural oes.

P letter of the Latin alphabet

P or p is the 16th letter of the modern English alphabet and the ISO basic Latin alphabet. Its name in English is pee, plural pees.

R Letter of the Latin alphabet

R or r is the 18th letter of the modern English alphabet and the ISO basic Latin alphabet. Its name in English is ar, plural ars, or in Ireland or.

S 19th letter in the English alphabet

S or s is the 19th letter in the Modern English alphabet and the ISO basic Latin alphabet. Its name in English is ess, plural esses.

X Letter of the Latin alphabet

X or x is the 24th and third-to-last letter in the modern English alphabet and the ISO basic Latin alphabet. Its name in English is ex, plural exes.

Te (Cyrillic) Cyrillic letter

Te is a letter of the Cyrillic script.

The Uralic Phonetic Alphabet (UPA) or Finno-Ugric transcription system is a phonetic transcription or notational system used predominantly for the transcription and reconstruction of Uralic languages. It was first published in 1901 by Eemil Nestor Setälä, a Finnish linguist.

L Letter of the Latin alphabet

L is the twelfth letter of the modern English alphabet and the ISO basic Latin alphabet. Its name in English is el, plural els.

J Letter of the Latin alphabet

J or j is the tenth letter in the modern English alphabet and the ISO basic Latin alphabet. Its usual name in English is jay, with a now-uncommon variant jy. When used in the International Phonetic Alphabet for the y sound, it may be called yod.

C Letter of the Latin alphabet

C or c is the third letter in the English and ISO basic Latin alphabets. Its name in English is cee, plural cees.

B Letter of the Latin alphabet

B or b is the second letter of the Latin-script alphabet. Its name in English is bee, plural bees. It represents the voiced bilabial stop in many languages, including English. In some other languages, it is used to represent other bilabial consonants.

References

  1. "T", Oxford English Dictionary, 2nd edition (1989); Merriam-Webster's Third New International Dictionary of the English Language, Unabridged (1993); "tee", op. cit.
  2. Lewand, Robert. "Relative Frequencies of Letters in General English Plain text". Cryptographical Mathematics. Central College. Archived from the original on 2008-07-08. Retrieved 2008-06-25.
  3. Constable, Peter (2003-09-30). "L2/03-174R2: Proposal to Encode Phonetic Symbols with Middle Tilde in the UCS" (PDF).
  4. Constable, Peter (2004-04-19). "L2/04-132 Proposal to add additional phonetic characters to the UCS" (PDF).
  5. Everson, Michael (2006-08-06). "L2/06-266: Proposal to add Latin letters and a Greek symbol to the UCS" (PDF).
  6. Everson, Michael; et al. (2002-03-20). "L2/02-141: Uralic Phonetic Alphabet characters for the UCS" (PDF).
  7. Ruppel, Klaas; Aalto, Tero; Everson, Michael (2009-01-27). "L2/09-028: Proposal to encode additional characters for the Uralic Phonetic Alphabet" (PDF).
  8. Cook, Richard; Everson, Michael (2001-09-20). "L2/01-347: Proposal to add six phonetic characters to the UCS" (PDF).
  9. Everson, Michael; Jacquerye, Denis; Lilley, Chris (2012-07-26). "L2/12-270: Proposal for the addition of ten Latin characters to the UCS" (PDF).