Law Society of England and Wales

Last updated

The Law Society
Law Society of England and Wales logo.png
Formation2 June 1825;196 years ago (1825-06-02)
TypeProfessional organisation
Headquarters Chancery Lane
London, WC2
Region served
England and Wales
President
I. Stephanie Boyce
Website www.lawsociety.org.uk

The Law Society of England and Wales (officially The Law Society) is the professional association that represents and governs solicitors for the jurisdiction of England and Wales. It provides services and support to practising and training solicitors, as well as serving as a sounding board for law reform. Members of the Society are often consulted when important issues are being debated in Parliament or by the executive. The Society was formed in 1825.

Contents

The Hall of The Law Society is in Chancery Lane, London, but it also has offices in Cardiff to deal with the Wales jurisdiction and the Senedd, and Brussels, to deal with European Union law.

A president is elected annually to serve for one year. The current president is I. Stephanie Boyce. [1]

Barristers in England and Wales have a similar professional body, the General Council of the Bar, commonly known as the Bar Council.

History

The coat of arms of the Law Society. Law Society Arms.jpg
The coat of arms of the Law Society.
Headquarters of the Law Society on Chancery Lane, London Law Society, Chancery Lane, London.jpg
Headquarters of the Law Society on Chancery Lane, London

The London Law Institution, the predecessor to the Law Society, was founded in 1823 when many London Solicitors came together to raise the reputation of the profession by setting standards and ensuring good practice. 'London' was dropped from the title in 1825 to reflect the fact that the Law Institution had national aspirations.

The Society was founded on 2 June 1825, when a committee of management was appointed. The Society acquired its first Royal Charter in 1831 as The Society of Attorneys, Solicitors, Proctors and others not being Barristers, practising in the Courts of Law and Equity of the United Kingdom. [2] A new Charter in 1845 defined the Society as an independent, private body servicing the affairs of the profession like other professional, literary and scientific bodies. By further Royal Charter in 1903 the name of the Society was changed to simply "The Law Society". The Society first admitted women members in 1922. [3]

In July 2013, the Association of Women Solicitors (AWS), a national organisation working with and representing women solicitors in the United Kingdom, merged with the Law Society to form its Women Lawyers Division. Although merged, the AWS will operate separately from the Law Society. [4]

Discipline

In 1834, the Society first initiated proceedings against dishonest practitioners. By 1907, the Society possessed a statutory disciplinary committee, and was empowered to investigate solicitors' accounts and to issue annual practising certificates. In 1983, the Society established the Office for the Supervision of Solicitors to deal with complaints about solicitors. Complaints regarding the conduct of solicitors are now dealt with by the Solicitors Regulation Authority (SRA). However complaints regarding poor service are the remit of the Legal Ombudsman. [5]

The Solicitors Act 1860 enabled the Society to create a three-tier examination system. [3] In 1903, the Society established its own Law Society School of Law, which later merged with tutorial firm Gibson and Weldon to become the independent College of Law. By 1922 The Law Society required a compulsory academic year for all clerks.

Regulatory body status

Following the recommendations of the Clementi Review The Law Society split its representative and regulatory functions.

Complaints from the public are handled by the Legal Ombudsman which is a single portal for complaints by the public made against all providers of legal services including the Bar, licensed conveyancers etc., but excluding unqualified will-writers.

The regulatory body for solicitors is the Solicitors Regulation Authority. It is a Board of The Law Society although it regulates and enforces regulation completely independently of the Law Society. The Law Society remains the approved regulator, although following the Legal Services Act 2007 a new body, the Legal Services Board (chaired by Sir Michael Pitt, a government appointee) oversees all the approved regulators including the Bar Council, which has also divested its regulatory functions into the Bar Standards Board.

The Law Society of England and Wales is a Designated Professional Body under the Financial Services & Markets Act 2000.

The Hall of The Law Society

Located at 113 Chancery Lane The Hall of The Law Society is the principal building of the society. Built in 1832 the building is Grade II* listed. The architect was Lewis Vulliamy. An extension in 1902-04 was designed by Charles Holden. [6] In addition to offices for its staff the building is used for Law Society conferences and events [7] and parts of the building are available on a private hire basis for events. [8]

Past presidents

Standard Conditions of Sale

The "Standard Conditions of Sale" are issued by the Law Society to provide a standard set of rules and expectations for the sale and purchase of residential property in England and Wales. As a contractual instrument they are intended "to create legal rights and legal obligations" on the part of both parties to a transaction. [60] The fifth (current) edition was initially published in 2011, [61] and was revised in 2018. [60] The majority of residential property sales are subject to these conditions. [62]

See also

Related Research Articles

Attorney General for England and Wales Law officer of the Monarch of England and Wales

Her Majesty's Attorney General for England and Wales, usually known as the attorney general, is one of the law officers of the Crown. The attorney general serves as the principal legal adviser to the Crown and the Government in England and Wales. The attorney general maintains their own office and currently attends Cabinet. The office is also concurrently held with that of Advocate General for Northern Ireland.

Government Legal Department

The Government Legal Department is the largest in-house legal organisation in the United Kingdom's Government Legal Service.

Lord Advocate

Her Majesty's Advocate, known as the Lord Advocate, is the chief legal officer of the Scottish Government and the Crown in Scotland for both civil and criminal matters that fall within the devolved powers of the Scottish Parliament. They are the chief public prosecutor for Scotland and all prosecutions on indictment are conducted by the Crown Office and Procurator Fiscal Service, nominally in the Lord Advocate's name.

Solicitor General for Scotland

Her Majesty's Solicitor General for Scotland is one of the Law Officers of the Crown, and the deputy of the Lord Advocate, whose duty is to advise the Scottish Government on Scots Law. They are also responsible for the Crown Office and Procurator Fiscal Service which together constitute the Criminal Prosecution Service in Scotland.

Solicitor-General for Ireland

The Solicitor-General for Ireland was the holder of an Irish and then United Kingdom government office. The holder was a deputy to the Attorney-General for Ireland, and advised the Crown on Irish legal matters. At least two holders of the office, Patrick Barnewall (1534–1550) and Roger Wilbraham (1586-1603), played a leading role in Government. As with the Solicitor General for England and Wales, the Solicitor-General for Ireland was usually a barrister rather than a solicitor.

Below is a list of people who have served as Lord Lieutenant of Northamptonshire. Since 1735, all Lords Lieutenant have also been Custos Rotulorum of Northamptonshire. The lieutenancy included the Soke of Peterborough until 1965, when the Lord Lieutenant of Huntingdonshire became Lord Lieutenant of Huntingdon and Peterborough. This merged with the lieutenancy of Cambridgeshire and Isle of Ely in 1974, forming the jurisdiction of the present Lord Lieutenant of Cambridgeshire.

The High Sheriff of Tipperary was the Sovereign's judicial representative in County Tipperary. Initially an office for lifetime, assigned by the Sovereign, the High Sheriff became annually appointed from the Provisions of Oxford in 1258. Besides his judicial importance, he had ceremonial and administrative functions and executed High Court Writs.

The High Sheriff of County Galway was the Sovereign's judicial representative in County Galway. Initially an office for lifetime, assigned by the Sovereign, the High Sheriff became annually appointed from the Provisions of Oxford in 1258. Besides his judicial importance, he had ceremonial and administrative functions and executed High Court Writs.

This is a list of sheriffs and high sheriffs of Shropshire

The Solicitor-General of Victoria, Australia is the state's Second Law Officer, behind the Attorney-General. The holders of this office are appointed by Cabinet on the basis of their legal expertise. Solicitors-General are members of the Executive. Formerly, they were elected members of parliament, but have not been so since the early/mid twentieth century.

Solicitors Journal is a monthly legal journal published in the United Kingdom by the International In-house Counsel Journal, Cambridge. It was established in 1856 and covers "practical and independent updates and analysis about the latest developments affecting the legal profession." The magazine has its headquarters in Cambridge.

The Attorney-General of Barbados is the primary legal advisor to the Government of Barbados.

The Golden Jubilee Honours for the British Empire were announced on 21 June 1887 to celebrate the Golden Jubilee of Queen Victoria on 20 June 1887.

The 1902 Birthday Honours were announced on 10 November 1902, to celebrate the birthday of Edward VII the previous day. The list included appointments to various orders and honours of the United Kingdom and the British Empire.

The 1903 Birthday Honours were announced on 9 November 1903, to celebrate the birthday of King Edward VII that day. The list included appointments to various orders and honours of the United Kingdom and the British Empire.

The 1945 New Year Honours were appointments by many of the Commonwealth realms of King George VI to various orders and honours to reward and highlight good works by citizens of those countries. They were announced on 1 January 1945 for the British Empire, Canada, and the Union of South Africa to celebrate the past year and mark the beginning of 1945.

The New Year Honours 1920 were appointments by King George V to various orders and honours to reward and highlight good works by members of the British Empire. They were published on 1 January 1920 and 30 March 1920.

The Queen's Birthday Honours 1899 were announced on 3 June 1899 in celebration of the birthday of Queen Victoria. The list included appointments to various orders and honours of the United Kingdom and British India.

The 1894 Birthday Honours were appointments by Queen Victoria to various orders and honours to reward and highlight good works by citizens of the British Empire. The appointments were made to celebrate the official birthday of The Queen, and were published in the London Gazette on 25 May 1894. and in The Times on 26 May 1894.

Gibson and Weldon

Gibson and Weldon was a law practice at 27 Chancery Lane in London and the name of its tutorial firm which from 1876 until 1962 prepared hundreds of thousands of future solicitors and barristers in England and Wales for their examinations. Gibson and Weldon also published the monthly journal Law Notes and a series of legal textbooks from adjacent offices at 25–26 Chancery Lane. The firm's principals were Albert Gibson (1852–1921) and Arthur William Weldon (1856–1943). After the death of Arthur Weldon the tutorial firm continued until 1962 when it was merged with the Law Society's own law school to form the College of Law.

References

  1. Law Society Press Release, 19 March 2021
  2. Law Society Royal Charters Archived 21 November 2008 at the Wayback Machine
  3. 1 2 Law Society Website History Section Archived 27 December 2010 at the Wayback Machine
  4. "Law Society Women Lawyers Division appoints inaugural council". lawsociety.org.uk. 17 July 2013. Retrieved 29 November 2015.
  5. http://www.sra.org.uk/consumers/problems/report-solicitor.page#legal-ombudsman [ bare URL ]
  6. "The Law Society, Listed Building, Grade II*" . Retrieved 4 July 2020.
  7. https://events.lawsociety.org.uk/ [ bare URL ]
  8. https://www.goaskeve.com/venues/113-chancery-lane-the-law-society-london-venue-hire/ [ bare URL ]
  9. "Chief executive and office holders". Law Society. Retrieved 19 March 2021.
  10. "Chief executive and office holders". Law Society. Retrieved 26 October 2020.
  11. 1 2 "Chief executive and office holders". Law Society. Retrieved 5 July 2018.
  12. "President-Joe sets out his priorities for the year". Law Society. Retrieved 30 June 2018.
  13. "Chief Executive and Office Holders". The Law Society. Retrieved 22 August 2013.
  14. "Law Society welcomes 'virtual lawyer' Lucy Scott-Moncrieff as new president". The Law Society. Retrieved 22 August 2013.
  15. "City of London Law Society Lifetime Achievement Award: John Wotton". Legalweek.com. Retrieved 22 August 2013.
  16. "RadcliffesLe Brasseur". Archived from the original on 29 October 2013. Retrieved 22 August 2013.
  17. "Presidents making history in Birmingham". Birmingham City Council. Retrieved 22 August 2013.
  18. "Law Society of England and Wales President to visit University". University of Wolverhampton. Retrieved 22 August 2013.
  19. "Andrew Holroyd, OBE". Liverpool John Moores University. Archived from the original on 3 September 2014. Retrieved 22 August 2013.
  20. "Fiona Woolf" . Retrieved 22 August 2013.
  21. "The Modern President". Archived from the original on 5 September 2008. Retrieved 22 August 2013.
  22. "Law Society Biographies" (PDF). Law Society. Retrieved 22 August 2013.
  23. "Law Society chief 'was left shaking after outburst'". The Telegraph. Retrieved 22 August 2013.
  24. "Law Society aims to have MDPs operating by 2000". The Lawyer. Retrieved 22 August 2013.
  25. "No. 39104". The London Gazette (Supplement). 29 December 1950. p. 1.
  26. "No. 38929". The London Gazette (Supplement). 2 June 1950. p. 2776.
  27. "No. 38493". The London Gazette (Supplement). 31 December 1948. p. 1.
  28. "No. 37977". The London Gazette (Supplement). 6 June 1947. p. 2572.
  29. "No. 37598". The London Gazette (Supplement). 4 June 1946. p. 2756.
  30. "No. 37119". The London Gazette (Supplement). 14 June 1945. p. 2934.
  31. "No. 36544". The London Gazette (Supplement). 2 June 1944. p. 2565.
  32. "No. 36033". The London Gazette (Supplement). 28 May 1943. p. 2418.
  33. "No. 35029". The London Gazette (Supplement). 31 December 1940. p. 2.
  34. "No. 34633". The London Gazette (Supplement). 6 June 1939. p. 3852.
  35. "No. 34518". The London Gazette (Supplement). 7 June 1938. p. 3686.
  36. "No. 34396". The London Gazette (Supplement). 11 May 1937. p. 3076.
  37. "No. 33898". The London Gazette (Supplement). 30 December 1932. p. 2.
  38. Alumni Cantabrigienses: A Biographical List of All Known Students ..., Volume 2. p. 404.
  39. "No. 33390". The London Gazette (Supplement). 4 June 1928. p. 3846.
  40. "No. 33119". The London Gazette (Supplement). 29 December 1925. p. 2.
  41. "No. 33007". The London Gazette (Supplement). 30 December 1924. p. 2.
  42. "No. 32840". The London Gazette (Supplement). 29 June 1923. p. 4606.
  43. The Times, 24 April 1923
  44. 1 2 "Our history". Druces. Retrieved 5 July 2018.
  45. "Court Circular". The Times (36804). London. 26 June 1902. p. 9.
  46. "The Law Society". The Times (36752). London. 26 April 1902. p. 8.
  47. Venn, John. Alumni Cantabrigienses: A Biographical List of All Known Students ..., Volume 2. p. 435.
  48. "History". Penningtons Maches cooper. Retrieved 26 August 2019.
  49. The Law Journal, Volume 11. p. 432.
  50. 1 2 The Solicitors' Journal and Reporter, Volume 19. p. 141.
  51. The Solicitors' Journal, Volume 21. p. 167.
  52. Dietrichsen and Hannay's Royal Almanack and Nautical and Astronomical Ephemeris. p. 81.
  53. The British Almanac, Volume 35. p. 78.
  54. The Solicitors' Journal and Reporter, Volume 21. p. 823.
  55. The Legal Observer, Or, Journal of Jurisprudence, Volume 36. p. 270.
  56. Hume, Abraham. The Learned Societies and Printing Clubs of the United Kingdom. p. 91.
  57. 1 2 Justice of the Peace Volume 10. p. 530.
  58. Oldfield, Paul. Victoria Crosses on the Western Front August 1914- April 1915. p. 199.
  59. The Royal Kalendar and Court and City Register for England, Scotland. p. 341.
  60. 1 2 Law Society, Standard Conditions of Sale (5th edition – 2018 revision), accessed 20 January 2021
  61. Coop Legal Services, What are the Standard Conditions of Sale?, published 28 September 2017, accessed 20 January 2021
  62. DGPS Partnership LLP, Standard Conditions Of Sale (5th Edition) Guide, accessed 21 January 2021