List of FIFA Women's World Cup finals

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The FIFA Women's World Cup is an international association football competition established in 1991. It is contested by the women's national teams of the members of Fédération Internationale de Football Association (FIFA), the sport's global governing body. The tournament has taken place every four years. The most recent World Cup, hosted by France in 2019, was won by the United States, who beat the Netherlands 2–0 to win their second consecutive and fourth overall title. [1]

Contents

Just like the men's tournament the World Cup final match is the last of the competition, and the result determines which country is declared world champions. If after 90 minutes of regular play the score is a draw, an additional 30-minute period of play, called extra time, is added. If such a game is still tied after extra time it is decided by kicks from the penalty shoot-out. The winning penalty shoot-out area team are then declared champions. [2] The tournament has been decided by a one-off match on every occasion.

List of finals

Key to the list of finals
*Match was won with a golden goal
Double-dagger-14-plain.pngMatch was won on a penalty shoot-out after extra time
List of finals matches, their venues and locations, the finalists and final scores
YearWinnersScoreRunners-upVenueLocationAttendanceRef(s)
1991 United States  Flag of the United States.svg 2–1 Flag of Norway.svg  Norway Tianhe Stadium Guangzhou, China63,000 [3]
1995 Norway  Flag of Norway.svg 2–0 Flag of Germany.svg  Germany Råsunda Stadium Stockholm, Sweden17,158 [4]
1999 United States  Flag of the United States.svgDouble-dagger-14-plain.png 0–0 Double-dagger-14-plain.pngFlag of the People's Republic of China.svg  China PR Rose Bowl Pasadena, California, US90,185 [5]
2003 Germany  Flag of Germany.svg* 2–1*Flag of Sweden.svg  Sweden Home Depot Center Carson, California, US26,137 [6]
2007 Germany  Flag of Germany.svg 2–0 Flag of Brazil.svg  Brazil Hongkou Football Stadium Shanghai, China31,000 [7]
2011 Japan  Flag of Japan.svgDouble-dagger-14-plain.png 2–2 Double-dagger-14-plain.pngFlag of the United States.svg  United States Commerzbank-Arena Frankfurt, Germany48,817 [8]
2015 United States  Flag of the United States.svg 5–2 Flag of Japan.svg  Japan BC Place Vancouver, Canada53,341 [9]
2019 United States  Flag of the United States.svg 2–0 Flag of the Netherlands.svg  Netherlands Parc Olympique Lyonnais Décines-Charpieu, France57,900 [10]

Results by nation

National teamWinsRunners-upTotal finalsYears wonYears runners-up
Flag of the United States.svg  United States 415 1991, 1999, 2015, 2019 2011
Flag of Germany.svg  Germany 213 2003, 2007 1995
Flag of Japan.svg  Japan 112 2011 2015
Flag of Norway.svg  Norway 112 1995 1991
Flag of Brazil.svg  Brazil 011 2007
Flag of the People's Republic of China.svg  China PR 011 1999
Flag of the Netherlands.svg  Netherlands 011 2019
Flag of Sweden.svg  Sweden 011 2003

    Results by confederation

    ConfederationAppearancesWinnersRunners-up
    UEFA 734
    CONCACAF 541
    AFC 312
    CONMEBOL 101

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    References

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    2. "Laws of the Game" (PDF). FIFA.com (Fédération Internationale de Football Association). Retrieved 9 February 2009.
    3. Basler, Barbara (1 December 1991). "Soccer; U.S. women beat Norway to capture World Cup". The New York Times. Retrieved 30 June 2015.
    4. Shannon, David. "Women's World Cup 1995 (Sweden)". rsssf.com. Retrieved 30 June 2015.
    5. Gildea, William (11 July 1999). "U.S. Effort Nets Second World Cup Title". The Washington Post. p. A1. Retrieved 15 May 2019.
    6. Longman, Jere (13 October 2013). "SOCCER; Golden Goal Proves Magical as Germany Captures Women's World Cup". The New York Times . Retrieved 30 June 2015.
    7. "FIFA Women's World Cup - Sweden 1995". FIFA.com. Retrieved 30 June 2015.
    8. "Japan edge out USA on penalties to lift women's World Cup". The Guardian. 18 July 2011. Retrieved 30 June 2015.
    9. "USA 5-2 Japan". fifa.com. Retrieved 2 July 2015.
    10. "Megan Rapinoe on the spot as USA beat Netherlands to win Women's World Cup". The Guardian. 7 July 2019. Retrieved 7 July 2019.