List of FIFA Women's World Cup finals

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The FIFA Women's World Cup is an international association football competition established in 1991. It is contested by the women's national teams of the members of Fédération Internationale de Football Association (FIFA), the sport's global governing body. The tournament has taken place every four years. The most recent World Cup, hosted by France in 2019, was won by the United States, who beat the Netherlands 2–0 to win their second consecutive and fourth overall title. [1]

FIFA Womens World Cup Association football competition for womens national teams

The FIFA Women's World Cup is an international football competition contested by the senior women's national teams of the members of Fédération Internationale de Football Association (FIFA), the sport's international governing body. The competition has been held every four years since 1991, when the inaugural tournament, then called the FIFA Women's World Championship, was held in China. Under the tournament's current format, national teams vie for 23 slots in a three-year qualification phase. The host nation's team is automatically entered as the 24th slot. The tournament proper, alternatively called the World Cup Finals, is contested at venues within the host nation(s) over a period of about one month.

Association football Team field sport

Association football, more commonly known as football or soccer, is a team sport played with a spherical ball between two teams of eleven players. It is played by 250 million players in over 200 countries and dependencies, making it the world's most popular sport. The game is played on a rectangular field called a pitch with a goal at each end. The object of the game is to score by moving the ball beyond the goal line into the opposing goal.

1991 FIFA Womens World Cup 1991 edition of the FIFA Womens World Cup

The 1991 FIFA Women's World Cup was the inaugural FIFA Women's World Cup, the world championship for women's national association football teams. It took place in Guangdong, China from 16 to 30 November 1991. FIFA, football's international governing body selected China as host nation as Guangdong had hosted a prototype world championship three years earlier, the 1988 FIFA Women's Invitation Tournament. Matches were played in the state capital, Guangzhou, as well as in Foshan, Jiangmen and Zhongshan. The competition was sponsored by Mars, Incorporated. With FIFA still reluctant to bestow their "World Cup" brand, the tournament was officially known as the 1st FIFA World Championship for Women's Football for the M&M's Cup.

Contents

Just like the men's tournament the World Cup final match is the last of the competition, and the result determines which country is declared world champions. If after 90 minutes of regular play the score is a draw, an additional 30-minute period of play, called extra time, is added. If such a game is still tied after extra time it is decided by kicks from the penalty shoot-out. The winning penalty shoot-out area team are then declared champions. [2] The tournament has been decided by a one-off match on every occasion.

FIFA World Cup Association football competition for mens national teams

The FIFA World Cup, often simply called the World Cup, is an international association football competition contested by the senior men's national teams of the members of the Fédération Internationale de Football Association (FIFA), the sport's global governing body. The championship has been awarded every four years since the inaugural tournament in 1930, except in 1942 and 1946 when it was not held because of the Second World War. The current champion is France, which won its second title at the 2018 tournament in Russia.

A draw or tie occurs in a competitive sport when the results are identical or inconclusive. Ties or draws are possible in some, but not all, sports and games. Such an outcome, sometimes referred to as deadlock, can occur in politics, business, and wherever there are different factions regarding an issue.

A penalty shoot-out is a method of determining which team is awarded victory in an association football match that cannot end in a draw, when the score is tied after the regulation playing time as well as extra time have expired. In a penalty shoot-out, each team takes turns shooting at goal from the penalty mark, with the goal only defended by the opposing team's goalkeeper. Each team has five shots which must be taken by different kickers; the team that makes more successful kicks is declared the victor. Shoot-outs finish as soon as one team has an insurmountable lead. If scores are level after five pairs of shots, the shootout progresses into additional "sudden-death" rounds. Balls successfully kicked into the goal during a shoot-out do not count as goals for the individual kickers or the team, and are tallied separately from the goals scored during normal play. Although the procedure for each individual kick in the shoot-out resembles that of a penalty kick, there are some differences. Most notably, neither the kicker nor any player other than the goalkeeper may play the ball again once it has been kicked.

List of finals

Key to the list of finals
*Match was won with a golden goal
Double-dagger-14-plain.pngMatch was won on a penalty shoot-out after extra time
List of finals matches, their venues and locations, the finalists and final scores
YearWinnersScoreRunners-upVenueLocationAttendanceRef(s)
1991 United States  Flag of the United States.svg 2–1 Flag of Norway.svg  Norway Tianhe Stadium Guangzhou, China63,000 [3]
1995 Norway  Flag of Norway.svg 2–0 Flag of Germany.svg  Germany Råsunda Stadium Stockholm, Sweden17,158 [4]
1999 United States  Flag of the United States.svgDouble-dagger-14-plain.png 0–0 Double-dagger-14-plain.pngFlag of the People's Republic of China.svg  China PR Rose Bowl Pasadena, California, US90,185 [5]
2003 Germany  Flag of Germany.svg* 2–1*Flag of Sweden.svg  Sweden Home Depot Center Carson, California, US26,137 [6]
2007 Germany  Flag of Germany.svg 2–0 Flag of Brazil.svg  Brazil Hongkou Football Stadium Shanghai, China31,000 [7]
2011 Japan  Flag of Japan.svgDouble-dagger-14-plain.png 2–2 Double-dagger-14-plain.pngFlag of the United States.svg  United States Commerzbank-Arena Frankfurt, Germany48,817 [8]
2015 United States  Flag of the United States.svg 5–2 Flag of Japan.svg  Japan BC Place Vancouver, Canada53,341 [9]
2019 United States  Flag of the United States.svg 2–0 Flag of the Netherlands.svg  Netherlands Parc Olympique Lyonnais Décines-Charpieu, France57,900 [10]

Results by nation

National teamWinsRunners-upTotal finalsYears wonYears runners-up
Flag of the United States.svg  United States 415 1991, 1999, 2015, 2019 2011
Flag of Germany.svg  Germany 213 2003, 2007 1995
Flag of Japan.svg  Japan 112 2011 2015
Flag of Norway.svg  Norway 112 1995 1991
Flag of Brazil.svg  Brazil 011 2007
Flag of the People's Republic of China.svg  China PR 011 1999
Flag of the Netherlands.svg  Netherlands 011 2019
Flag of Sweden.svg  Sweden 011 2003

    Results by confederation

    ConfederationAppearancesWinnersRunners-up
    UEFA 734
    CONCACAF 541
    AFC 312
    CONMEBOL 101

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    References

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