List of FIFA Women's World Cup hat-tricks

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Alex Morgan of the United States scored a joint-record 5 goals in a record 13-0 win against Thailand. Alex Morgan (28197704627).jpg
Alex Morgan of the United States scored a joint-record 5 goals in a record 13–0 win against Thailand.

This is a list of all hat-tricks scored during FIFA Women's World Cups; that is, the occasions when a footballer has scored three or more goals in a single football World Cup match (not including FIFA Women's World Cup qualification matches). So far, 23 hat-tricks have been scored in 270 matches in the 8 editions of the World Cup tournament. As FIFA is the governing body of football (soccer), official hat-tricks are only noted when FIFA recognises that at least three goals were scored by one player in one match.

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The first hat-trick was scored by Carolina Morace of Italy, playing against Chinese Taipei in the 1991 FIFA Women's World Cup; the most recent (as of 22 June 2019) was by Sam Kerr of Australia, playing against Jamaica in the 2019 FIFA Women's World Cup.

The record number of hat-tricks in a single World Cup tournament is six, which occurred during the 2015 FIFA Women's World Cup in Canada, coinciding with the expansion of the tournament to 24 teams from 16.

Notable World Cup hat-tricks

List of World Cup hat-tricks

Key
Player's team lost the match
Player's team drew the match
FIFA Women's World Cup hat-tricks
#PlayerGTime of goalsForResultAgainstTournamentRoundDateRef
1. Carolina Morace 37', 52', 66'Flag of Italy.svg  Italy 5–0Flag of Chinese Taipei (FIFA).svg  Chinese Taipei 1991, China 17 November 1991 [2]
2. Michelle Akers 58', 29', 33', 44' (pen.), 48'Flag of the United States.svg  United States 7–0Flag of Chinese Taipei (FIFA).svg  Chinese Taipei 24 November 1991 [2]
3. Carin Jennings 10', 22', 33'Flag of the United States.svg  United States 5–2Flag of Germany.svg  Germany 27 November 1991 [2]
4. Kristin Sandberg 30', 44', 82'Flag of Norway.svg  Norway 8–0Flag of Nigeria.svg  Nigeria 1995, Sweden 6 June 1995 [2]
5. Ann Kristin Aarønes 4', 21', 90+3'Flag of Norway.svg  Norway 7–0Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg  Canada 10 June 1995 [2]
6. Sissi 29', 42', 50'Flag of Brazil.svg  Brazil 7–1Flag of Mexico.svg  Mexico 1999, United States 19 June 1999 [2]
7. Pretinha 3', 12', 90+1'Flag of Brazil.svg  Brazil 7–1Flag of Mexico.svg  Mexico 19 June 1999 [2]
8. Sun Wen 9', 21', 54'Flag of the People's Republic of China.svg  China PR 7–0Flag of Ghana.svg  Ghana 23 June 1999 [2]
9. Inka Grings 10', 57', 90+2'Flag of Germany.svg  Germany 6–0Flag of Mexico.svg  Mexico 24 June 1999 [2]
10. Mio Otani 72', 75', 80'Flag of Japan.svg  Japan 6–0Flag of Argentina.svg  Argentina 2003, United States Group stage 20 September 2003 [3]
11. Birgit Prinz 29', 45+1', 59'Flag of Germany.svg  Germany 11–0Flag of Argentina.svg  Argentina 2007, China 10 September 2007 [2]
12. Sandra Smisek 57', 70', 79'Flag of Germany.svg  Germany 11–0Flag of Argentina.svg  Argentina 10 September 2007 [2]
13. Ragnhild Gulbrandsen 39', 59', 62'Flag of Norway.svg  Norway 7–2Flag of Ghana.svg  Ghana 20 September 2007 [2]
14. Homare Sawa 13', 39', 80'Flag of Japan.svg  Japan 4–0Flag of Mexico.svg  Mexico 2011, Germany 1 July 2011 [2]
15. Célia Šašić 3', 14', 31'Flag of Germany.svg  Germany 10–0Flag of Cote d'Ivoire.svg  Ivory Coast 2015, Canada 7 June 2015 [4]
16. Anja Mittag 29', 35', 64'Flag of Germany.svg  Germany 10–0Flag of Cote d'Ivoire.svg  Ivory Coast 7 June 2015 [4]
17. Gaëlle Enganamouit 36', 73', 90+4' (pen.)Flag of Cameroon.svg  Cameroon 6–0Flag of Ecuador.svg  Ecuador 8 June 2015 [5]
18. Fabienne Humm 47', 49', 52'Flag of Switzerland.svg   Switzerland 10–1Flag of Ecuador.svg  Ecuador 12 June 2015 [6]
19. Ramona Bachmann 60' (pen.), 61', 81'Flag of Switzerland.svg   Switzerland 10–1Flag of Ecuador.svg  Ecuador 12 June 2015 [6]
20. Carli Lloyd 3', 5', 16'Flag of the United States.svg  United States 5–2Flag of Japan.svg  Japan 5 July 2015 [6] [7]
21. Cristiane Rozeira 15', 50', 64'Flag of Brazil.svg  Brazil 3–0Flag of Jamaica.svg  Jamaica 2019, France 9 June 2019 [8]
22. Alex Morgan 512', 53', 74', 81', 87'Flag of the United States.svg  United States 13–0Flag of Thailand.svg  Thailand 11 June 2019 [9]
23. Cristiana Girelli 12' (pen.), 25', 46'Flag of Italy.svg  Italy 5–0Flag of Jamaica.svg  Jamaica 14 June 2019 [10]
24. Sam Kerr 411', 42', 69', 83'Flag of Australia (converted).svg  Australia 4–1Flag of Jamaica.svg  Jamaica 18 June 2019 [11]

See also

Related Research Articles

A hat-trick or hat trick is the achievement of a generally positive feat three times in a game, or another achievement based on the number three.

Italy womens national football team Womens national association football team representing Italy

The Italy women's national football team has represented Italy in international women's football since their inception in 1968. The team is controlled by the Italian Football Federation (FIGC), the governing body for football in Italy.

Carolina Morace Italian footballer

Carolina Morace is a former Italian football player who played as a striker. She played for the Italian national team and for various clubs in women's Serie A. She was the top scorer in Serie A in the 1984–85 season, and for 11 consecutive years from 1987–88 to 1997–98. She is also a registered Lawyer.

Kubilay Türkyilmaz Turkish-Swiss football player

Kubilay "Kubi" Türkyilmaz is a Swiss former professional footballer who played as a forward. He completed his international career as the all-time joint leading goal scorer for the Swiss national team, with 34 goals in 64 appearances between 1988 and 2001, equalling the performance of Max Abegglen. Their record was bettered by Alexander Frei in 2008.

Japan womens national football team Womens national association football team representing Japan

The Japan women's national football team, or Nadeshiko Japan (なでしこジャパン), represents Japan in women's association football and is run by the Japan Football Association (JFA). It is the most successful women's national team from the Asian Football Confederation. Its highest ranking in the FIFA Women's World Rankings is 3rd, achieved in December 2011.

Carli Lloyd American association football player

Carli Anne Hollins, known as Carli Lloyd, is an American soccer player for the Sky Blue FC in the National Women's Soccer League and the United States women's national soccer team as a midfielder. She is a two-time Olympic gold medalist, two-time FIFA Women's World Cup champion, two-time FIFA Player of the Year, and a three-time Olympian. Lloyd scored the gold medal-winning goals in the finals of the 2008 Summer Olympics and the 2012 Summer Olympics. Lloyd also helped the United States win their titles at the 2015 and 2019 FIFA Women's World Cups and she played for the team at the 2011 FIFA Women's World Cup where the U.S. finished in second place. Lloyd has made over 290 appearances for the U.S. national team, placing her third in caps, and has the fourth-most goals and seventh-most assists for the team.

Cristiane Rozeira Brazilian footballer

Cristiane Rozeira de Souza Silva, known as Cristiane[kɾis.ˈt͡ʃjɐ.ni], is a Brazilian footballer who plays for São Paulo FC and the Brazilian women's national team. A prolific forward, she was part of Brazil's silver medal-winning teams at the 2004 and 2008 Olympic football tournaments. In total she has participated in five FIFA Women's World Cups and four Olympics.

Sam Kerr Australian womens soccer player

Samantha May "Sam" Kerr is an Australian soccer player who plays for Chelsea in the English FA Women's Super League. She is the current captain of the Australia women's national soccer team. As of 2019, Kerr is the all-time leading scorer in both the National Women's Soccer League (NWSL) in the United States and the Australian W-League.

Group E of the 2014 FIFA World Cup consisted of Switzerland, Ecuador, France, and Honduras. Play began on 15 June and ended on 25 June 2014. The top two teams, France and Switzerland, advanced to the round of 16.

Fabienne Humm Association footballer

Fabienne Valérie Humm is a Swiss football forward, playing for FC Zürich of Switzerland's Nationalliga A. Since her debut in May 2012, a 1–0 win over Ireland, she has been a member of the Switzerland women's national football team.

This is a list of records of the FIFA Women's World Cup and its qualification matches.

2015 FIFA Womens World Cup Final Championship match of the 2015 FIFA Womens World Cup

The 2015 FIFA Women's World Cup Final was a women's association football match that took place on 5 July 2015 at BC Place, in Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada, to determine the winner of the 2015 FIFA Women's World Cup. It was played between Japan and the United States, in a rematch of the 2011 final. The stakes were high for both sides: if the United States won the match, it would be the only country to have won in three Women's World Cup finals; if Japan had won instead, then it would be the first football team, men's or women's, to win twice under the same coach since Vittorio Pozzo led Italy to victory in the 1934 World Cup and the 1938 World Cup. Ultimately, the United States won 5–2, winning its first title in 16 years and becoming the first team to win three Women's World Cup finals.

The following article outlines the statistics for the 2015 FIFA Women's World Cup, which took place in Canada from 6 June to 5 July.

United States at the FIFA Womens World Cup

The United States women's national soccer team is the most successful women's national team in the history of the Women's World Cup, having won four titles, earning second-place once and third-place finishes three times. The United States is one of the countries besides Germany, Japan, and Norway to win a FIFA Women's World Cup. The United States are also the only team that has played the maximum number of matches possible in every tournament.

Brazil at the FIFA Womens World Cup

The Brazil women's national football team has represented Brazil at the FIFA Women's World Cup on eight occasions in 1991, 1995, 1999, 2003, 2007, 2011, 2015 and 2019. They were runners-up once. They also reached the third place once.

References

  1. "Records tumble, holders advance and heavyweights collide". FIFA. 13 June 2015. Retrieved 13 June 2015.
  2. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 FIFA.com. "FIFA Women's World Cup™ archive". FIFA.com.
  3. "FIFA Women's World Cup 2003". 10 November 2005. Archived from the original on 10 November 2005.
  4. 1 2 FIFA.com. "FIFA Women's World Cup Canada 2015™ - Matches - Germany-Côte d'Ivoire". FIFA.com.
  5. FIFA.com. "FIFA Women's World Cup Canada 2015™ - Matches - Cameroon-Ecuador". FIFA.com.
  6. 1 2 3 FIFA.com. "FIFA Women's World Cup Canada 2015™ - Matches - Switzerland-Ecuador". FIFA.com.
  7. "The U.S. stuns Japan with FOUR goals in the first 15 minutes of World Cup final". USA Today.
  8. Miller, Nick (9 June 2019). "A brilliant hat-trick from Cristiane gave Brazil a convincing 3-0 victory in their first World Cup game against Jamaica". The Guardian .
  9. Schwartz, Nick (11 June 2019). "Women's World Cup: USWNT stuns Thailand with four goals in six minutes". USA Today .
  10. "Jamaica 0 - 5 Italy: Girelli's hat-trick, Galli's brace secures knockout spot for Italy". The Hindu . 14 June 2019.
  11. "Jamaica v Australia: Women's World Cup". The Guardian . 18 June 2019.