Lord Lieutenant of Derbyshire

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This is a list of people who have served as Lord Lieutenant of Derbyshire . Since 1689, all the Lord Lieutenants have also been Custos Rotulorum of Derbyshire.

Derbyshire ceremonial county in East Midlands, England

Derbyshire is a county in the East Midlands of England. A substantial portion of the Peak District National Park lies within Derbyshire, containing the southern extremity of the Pennine range of hills which extend into the north of the county. The county contains part of the National Forest, and borders on Greater Manchester to the northwest, West Yorkshire to the north, South Yorkshire to the northeast, Nottinghamshire to the east, Leicestershire to the southeast, Staffordshire to the west and southwest and Cheshire also to the west. Kinder Scout, at 636 metres (2,087 ft), is the highest point in the county, whilst Trent Meadows, where the River Trent leaves Derbyshire, is its lowest point at 27 metres (89 ft). The River Derwent is the county's longest river at 66 miles (106 km), and runs roughly north to south through the county. In 2003 the Ordnance Survey placed Church Flatts Farm at Coton in the Elms as the furthest point from the sea in Great Britain.

This is a list of people who have served as Custos Rotulorum of Derbyshire.

Francis Hastings, 2nd Earl of Huntingdon English noble

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George Talbot, 6th Earl of Shrewsbury English magnate and military commander

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Earl of Scarsdale was a title in the Peerage of England. It was created in 1645 for Francis Leke, 1st Baron Deincourt, an ardent supporter of Charles I during the Civil War. He had already been created a baronet, of Sutton in the County of Derby, in the Baronetage of England on 25 May 1611, and Baron Deincourt, of Sutton in the County of Derby, in the Peerage of England in 1628. His grandson, the third Earl, was a politician and courtier. In 1680, one year before he succeeded his father in the earldom, he was summoned to the House of Lords through a writ of acceleration as Baron Scarsdale. He was childless and was succeeded by his nephew, the fourth Earl. He was the son of the Honourable Richard Leke, younger son of the second Earl. He served as Lord Lieutenant of Derbyshire. He never married and the titles became extinct on his death in 1736.

There has been a Lord Lieutenant of Buckinghamshire almost continuously since the position was created by King Henry VIII in 1535. The only exception to this was the English Civil War and English Interregnum between 1643 and 1660 when there was no king to support the Lieutenancy. The following list consists of all known holders of the position: earlier records have been lost and so a complete list is not possible. Since 1702, all Lord Lieutenants have also been Custos Rotulorum of Buckinghamshire.

This is a list of people who have served as Lord Lieutenant for Staffordshire. Since 1828, all Lord Lieutenants have also been Custos Rotulorum of Staffordshire.

This is a list of people who have served as Lord Lieutenant of Nottinghamshire. Since 1694, all Lords Lieutenant have also been Custos Rotulorum of Nottinghamshire.

This is a list of people who served as Lord Lieutenant of Huntingdonshire.

This is a list of people who have served as Lord Lieutenant of Hampshire. Since 1688, all the Lords Lieutenant have also been Custos Rotulorum of Hampshire. From 1889 until 1959, the administrative county was named the County of Southampton.

This is a list of people who have served as Lord Lieutenant of Leicestershire. Since 1703, all Lord Lieutenants have also been Custos Rotulorum of Leicestershire.

This is an incomplete list of people who have served as Lord Lieutenant of Somerset. Since 1714, all Lord Lieutenants have also been Custos Rotulorum of Somerset.

William Cavendish, 2nd Earl of Devonshire Earl of Devonshire

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This is a list of people who served as Lord Lieutenant of Middlesex. From 1794 to 1965, all Lord Lieutenants were also Custos Rotulorum of Middlesex. The office was abolished on 1 April 1965, with the creation of Greater London and the post of Lord Lieutenant of Greater London, with small parts of Middlesex coming under the jurisdiction of the Lord Lieutenant of Surrey, the Lord Lieutenant of Hertfordshire.

This is a list of people who have served as Lord-Lieutenant of Westmorland. The office was abolished on 31 March 1974 and replaced by the Lord Lieutenant of Cumbria. From 1751 to 1974, all Lord Lieutenants were also Custos Rotulorum of Westmorland.

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William Cavendish may refer to:

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References

Sir John Christopher Sainty, KCB, FSA is a retired British civil servant who was Clerk of the Parliaments from 1983 to 1990.

  1. London Gazette, issue no. 47453, 2 February 1978
  2. London Gazette, issue no. 53727, 6 July 1994