Lord Lieutenant of Northumberland

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This is a list of people who have served as Lord-Lieutenant of Northumberland . Since 1802, all Lords Lieutenant have also been Custos Rotulorum of Northumberland.

Deputy Lieutenants

Deputy Lieutenants traditionally supported the Lord-Lieutenant. There could be many deputy lieutenants at any time, depending on the population of the county. Their appointment did not terminate with the changing of the Lord-Lieutenant, but they often retired at age 75.

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There has been a Lord Lieutenant of Buckinghamshire almost continuously since the position was created by King Henry VIII in 1535. The only exception to this was the English Civil War and English Interregnum between 1643 and 1660 when there was no king to support the Lieutenancy. The following list consists of all known holders of the position: earlier records have been lost and so a complete list is not possible. Since 1702, all Lord Lieutenants have also been Custos Rotulorum of Buckinghamshire.

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References

  1. "No. 49610". The London Gazette . 9 January 1984. p. 295.
  2. "No. 55958". The London Gazette . 1 September 2000. p. 9749.
  3. "Lord-Lieutenant for Northumberland". 10 Downing Street website. 12 May 2009. Archived from the original on 6 July 2009. Retrieved 13 May 2009.
  4. 1 2 3 4 5 "No. 27305". The London Gazette . 16 April 1901. p. 2625.
  5. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 "No. 27317". The London Gazette . 24 May 1901. p. 3562.
  6. Howard, Joseph Jackson; Crisp, Frederick Arthur, eds. (1901). Visitation of England and Wales. 9. p. 87.