Mitropa Cup

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Mitropa Cup
Mitropa cup trophy.png
The trophy awarded to champions
Organising body
List
Founded1927
Abolished1992;29 years ago (1992)
Region Central Europe
Number of teams4 (1992)
Related competitions Latin Cup
Balkans Cup
Last champions Flag of Yugoslavia (1946-1992).svg Borac Banja Luka (1992)
Most successful club(s) Flag of Hungary.svg Vasas
(6 titles)

The Mitropa Cup, officially called the La Coupe de l'Europe Centrale or Central European Cup, was one of the first international major European football cups for club sides. It was conducted among the successor states of the former Austria-Hungary. After World War II in 1951 a replacement tournament named Zentropa Cup was held, but just for one season, the Mitropa Cup name was revived, and again in 1958 the name of the tournament changed to Danube Cup but only for one season. The tournament was discontinued after 1992.

Contents

The most successful club is Vasas with six titles.

History

Nations which participated in the Mitropa Cup (1927-1940) Mitropa Cup.PNG
Nations which participated in the Mitropa Cup (1927–1940)

A first "International" competition for football clubs was founded in 1897 in Vienna. The Challenge Cup was invented by John Gramlick Sr., a co-founder of the Vienna Cricket and Football-Club. In this cup competition all clubs of the Austro-Hungarian Empire that normally would not meet could take part, though actually almost only clubs from the Empire's three major cities Vienna, Budapest and Prague participated. The Challenge Cup was carried out until the year 1911 and is today seen as the predecessor to the Mitropa Cup and consequently the European Cup and Champions League. The last winner of the cup was Wiener Sport-Club, one of the oldest and most traditional football clubs of Austria where the cup still remains.[ citation needed ]

The idea of a European cup competition was shaped after World War I which brought the defeat and collapse of the Austro-Hungarian Empire. The centre of this idea were the Central European countries that, at this time, were still leading in continental football. In the early 1920s they introduced professional leagues, the first continental countries to do so. Austria started in 1924, followed by Hungary in 1925 and Czechoslovakia in 1926. In order to strengthen the dominance of these countries in European football and to financially support the professional clubs, the introduction of the Mitropa Cup was decided at a meeting in Venice on 17 July, following the initiative of the head of the Austrian Football Association (ÖFB), Hugo Meisl. [1] [2] [3] Moreover, the creation of a European Cup for national teams – that unlike the Challenge Cup and the Mitropa Cup would not be annual – was also part of the agreement. The first matches were played on 14 August 1927. The competition was between the top professional teams of Central Europe.

The president and the captain of Bologna, Renato Dall'Ara (left) and Mirko Pavinato (right), with the trophy of the 1961 season. Bologna FC - 1961 Mitropa Cup - Renato Dall'Ara, Mirko Pavinato.jpg
The president and the captain of Bologna, Renato Dall'Ara (left) and Mirko Pavinato (right), with the trophy of the 1961 season.

Initially two teams each from Austria, Hungary, Czechoslovakia and Yugoslavia entered, competing in a knock-out competition. The countries involved could either send their respective league winners and runners-up, or league winners and cup winners to take part. The first winners were the Czech side, AC Sparta Prague. In 1929 Italian teams replaced the Yugoslavian ones. The competition was expanded to four teams from each of the competing countries in 1934. Other countries were invited to participate – Switzerland in 1936, and Romania, Switzerland and Yugoslavia in 1937. Austria was withdrawn from the competition following the Anschluss in 1938. In 1939, prior to the start of World War II, the cup involved only eight teams (two each from Hungary, Czechoslovakia and Italy and one each from Romania and Yugoslavia). The level of the competing nations is clearly shown by Italy's two World Cup titles (1934 & 1938), Czechoslovakia's (1934) and Hungary's (1938) World Cup final, and Austria's (1934) and Yugoslavia's (1930) semi-finals. Out of the eleven different teams competing in the first three World Cups, five were part of the Mitropa Cup.[ citation needed ]

A tournament was started in 1940, but abandoned before the final match due to World War II. Again, only eight teams competed, three each from Hungary and Yugoslavia and two from Romania. Hungarian Ferencváros and Romanian Rapid (which had won on lots after three draws) qualified for the final, but did not meet because the northern part of Transylvania (lost shortly after World War I) was ceded to Hungary from Romania.[ citation needed ]

Champions

Finals

SeasonCountryChampionsResultRunners-upCountry
1927 Flag of the Czech Republic.svg  Czechoslovakia Sparta Prague 6–2 Rapid Wien Flag of Austria.svg  Austria
1–2
1928 Flag of Hungary (1915-1918, 1919-1946).svg  Hungary Ferencváros 7–1 Rapid Wien Flag of Austria.svg  Austria
3–5
1929 Flag of Hungary (1915-1918, 1919-1946).svg  Hungary Újpest 5–1 Slavia Prague Flag of the Czech Republic.svg  Czechoslovakia
2–2
1930 Flag of Austria.svg  Austria Rapid Wien 2–0 Sparta Prague Flag of the Czech Republic.svg  Czechoslovakia
2–3
1931 Flag of Austria.svg  Austria First Vienna 3–2 Wiener AC Flag of Austria.svg  Austria
2–1
1932 Flag of Italy (1861-1946).svg  Italy Bologna N/A
None [note 1]
1933 Flag of Austria.svg  Austria Austria Wien 1–2 Ambrosiana-Inter Flag of Italy (1861-1946).svg  Italy
3–1
1934 Flag of Italy (1861-1946).svg  Italy Bologna 2–3 Admira Wien Flag of Austria.svg  Austria
5–1
1935 Flag of the Czech Republic.svg  Czechoslovakia Sparta Prague 1–2 Ferencváros Flag of Hungary (1915-1918, 1919-1946).svg  Hungary
3–0
1936 Flag of Austria.svg  Austria Austria Wien 0–0 Sparta Prague Flag of the Czech Republic.svg  Czechoslovakia
1–0
1937 Flag of Hungary (1915-1918, 1919-1946).svg  Hungary Ferencváros 4–2 Lazio Flag of Italy (1861-1946).svg  Italy
5–4
1938 Flag of the Czech Republic.svg  Czechoslovakia Slavia Prague 2–2 Ferencváros Flag of Hungary (1915-1918, 1919-1946).svg  Hungary
2–0
1939 Flag of Hungary (1915-1918, 1919-1946).svg  Hungary Újpest 4–1 Ferencváros Flag of Hungary (1915-1918, 1919-1946).svg  Hungary
2–2
1940
None [note 2]
N/A Rapid București
Ferencváros
Flag of Romania.svg  Romania
Flag of Hungary.svg  Hungary
1941–50
Not held
1951 Flag of Austria.svg  Austria Rapid Wien 3–2 Admira Wien Flag of Austria.svg  Austria
1952–54
Not held
1955 Flag of Hungary (1949-1956; 1-2 aspect ratio).svg  Hungary Vörös Lobogó 6–0 ÚDA Prague Flag of the Czech Republic.svg  Czechoslovakia
2–1
1956 Flag of Hungary (1949-1956; 1-2 aspect ratio).svg  Hungary Vasas 3–3 Rapid Wien Flag of Austria.svg  Austria
1–1
9–2
1957 Flag of Hungary.svg  Hungary Vasas 4–0 Vojvodina Flag of Yugoslavia (1946-1992).svg  Yugoslavia
1–2
1958 Flag of Yugoslavia (1946-1992).svg  Yugoslavia Red Star Belgrade 4–1 Rudá Hvězda Brno Flag of the Czech Republic.svg  Czechoslovakia
3–2
1959 Flag of Hungary.svg  Hungary Honvéd 4–3 MTK Flag of Hungary.svg  Hungary
2–2
1960
Flag of Hungary.svg  Hungary [note 3]
1961Flag of Italy.svg  Italy Bologna 2–2 Slovan Nitra Flag of the Czech Republic.svg  Czechoslovakia
3–0
1962Flag of Hungary.svg  Hungary Vasas 5–1 Bologna Flag of Italy.svg  Italy
1–2
1963Flag of Hungary.svg  Hungary MTK Budapest 2–1 Vasas Flag of Hungary.svg  Hungary
1–1
1964 Flag of the Czech Republic.svg  Czechoslovakia Sparta Prague 0–0 Slovan Bratislava Flag of the Czech Republic.svg  Czechoslovakia
2–0
1965Flag of Hungary.svg  Hungary Vasas 1–0 Fiorentina Flag of Italy.svg  Italy
1966Flag of Italy.svg  Italy Fiorentina 1–0 Jednota Trenčín Flag of the Czech Republic.svg  Czechoslovakia
1966–67 Flag of the Czech Republic.svg  Czechoslovakia Spartak Trnava 2–3 Újpesti Dózsa Flag of Hungary.svg  Hungary
3–1
1967–68 Flag of Yugoslavia (1946-1992).svg  Yugoslavia Red Star Belgrade 0–1 Spartak Trnava Flag of the Czech Republic.svg  Czechoslovakia
4–1
1968–69 Flag of the Czech Republic.svg  Czechoslovakia Inter Bratislava 4–1 Sklo Union Teplice Flag of the Czech Republic.svg  Czechoslovakia
0–0
1969–70 Flag of Hungary.svg  Hungary Vasas 1–2 Inter Bratislava Flag of the Czech Republic.svg  Czechoslovakia
4–1
1970–71 Flag of Yugoslavia (1946-1992).svg  Yugoslavia Čelik Zenica 3–1 Austria Salzburg Flag of Austria.svg  Austria
1971–72Flag of Yugoslavia (1946-1992).svg  Yugoslavia Čelik Zenica 0–0 Fiorentina Flag of Italy.svg  Italy
1–0
1972–73Flag of Hungary.svg  Hungary Tatabányai Bányász 2–1 Čelik Zenica Flag of Yugoslavia (1946-1992).svg  Yugoslavia
2–1
1973–74Flag of Hungary.svg  Hungary Tatabányai Bányász 3–2 ZVL Zilina Flag of the Czech Republic.svg  Czechoslovakia
2–0
1974–75Flag of Austria.svg  Austria Wacker Innsbruck 3–1 Honvéd Flag of Hungary.svg  Hungary
2–1
1975–76Flag of Austria.svg  Austria Wacker Innsbruck 3–1 Velež Mostar Flag of Yugoslavia (1946-1992).svg  Yugoslavia
3–1
1976–77Flag of Yugoslavia (1946-1992).svg  Yugoslavia Vojvodina RR Vasas Flag of Hungary.svg  Hungary
1977–78Flag of Yugoslavia (1946-1992).svg  Yugoslavia Partizan 1–0 Honvéd Flag of Hungary.svg  Hungary
1978–79
Not played
1979–80Flag of Italy.svg  Italy Udinese RR Čelik Zenica Flag of Yugoslavia (1946-1992).svg  Yugoslavia
1980–81Flag of the Czech Republic.svg  Czechoslovakia Tatran Prešov RR Csepel SC Flag of Hungary.svg  Hungary
1981–82Flag of Italy.svg  Italy Milan RR TJ Vítkovice Flag of the Czech Republic.svg  Czechoslovakia
1982–83Flag of Hungary.svg  Hungary Vasas RR ZVL Zilina Flag of the Czech Republic.svg  Czechoslovakia
1983–84Flag of Austria.svg  Austria SC Eisenstadt RR Prishtina Flag of Yugoslavia (1946-1992).svg  Yugoslavia
1984–85Flag of Yugoslavia (1946-1992).svg  Yugoslavia Iskra Bugojno RR Atalanta Flag of Italy.svg  Italy
1985–86Flag of Italy.svg  Italy Pisa 2–0 Debrecen Flag of Hungary.svg  Hungary
1986–87Flag of Italy.svg  Italy Ascoli 1–0 Bohemians Prague Flag of the Czech Republic.svg  Czechoslovakia
1987–88Flag of Italy.svg  Italy Pisa 3–0 Váci Izzó Flag of Hungary.svg  Hungary
1988–89Flag of the Czech Republic.svg  Czechoslovakia Baník Ostrava 2–1 Bologna Flag of Italy.svg  Italy
2–1
1990Flag of Italy.svg  Italy Bari 1–0 Genoa Flag of Italy.svg  Italy
1991Flag of Italy.svg  Italy Torino 2–1
(a.e.t)
Pisa Flag of Italy.svg  Italy
1992 Flag of Yugoslavia (1946-1992).svg  Yugoslavia Borac Banja Luka 1–1 (a.e.t)
5–3 (p)
BVSC Flag of Hungary.svg  Hungary
Notes
  1. The final was scratched and Bologna were awarded the cup after Slavia Prague and Juventus were both ejected from the competition.
  2. The final between Rapid București and Ferencváros was scheduled to take place in July 1940. However, due to the events of World War II, it was cancelled.
  3. It was contested as a competition between countries and there was no elimination. The five competing countries each sent six teams each to the competition and their aggregate results counted toward their country's tally.

Performances

Note: The 1960 edition is not included in the list because it was won by a nation rather than club.

By club

ClubWinnersRunner-upWinning seasonsRunners-up seasons
Flag of Hungary.svg Vasas
6
2
1956, 1957, 1962, 1965, 1970, 19831963, 1977
Flag of Italy.svg Bologna
3
2
1932, 1934, 19611962, 1989
Flag of the Czech Republic.svg Sparta Prague
3
2
1927, 1935, 1964 1930, 1936
Flag of Hungary.svg Ferencváros
2
4
1928, 1937 1935, 1938, 1939, 1940
Flag of Austria.svg Rapid Wien
2
3
1930, 19511927, 1928, 1956
Flag of Yugoslavia (1946-1992).svg Čelik Zenica
2
2
1971, 19721973, 1980
Flag of Hungary.svg MTK Budapest
2
1
1955, 19631959
Flag of Hungary.svg Újpest
2
1
1929, 1939 1967
Flag of Italy.svg Pisa
2
1
1986, 19881991
Flag of Yugoslavia (1946-1992).svg Red Star Belgrade
2
1958, 1968
Flag of Austria.svg Austria Wien
2
1933, 1936
Flag of Austria.svg Wacker Innsbruck
2
1975, 1976
Flag of Hungary.svg Tatabányai Bányász
2
1973, 1974
Flag of Hungary.svg Budapest Honvéd
1
2
19591975, 1978
Flag of Italy.svg Fiorentina
1
2
19661965, 1972
Flag of the Czech Republic.svg Spartak Trnava
1
2
1967 1958, 1968
Flag of the Czech Republic.svg Inter Bratislava
1
1
19691970
Flag of the Czech Republic.svg Slavia Prague
1
1
1938 1929
Flag of Yugoslavia (1946-1992).svg Vojvodina
1
1
19771957
Flag of Yugoslavia (1946-1992).svg Borac Banja Luka
1
1992
Flag of Yugoslavia (1946-1992).svg Iskra Bugojno
1
1985
Flag of Yugoslavia (1946-1992).svg Partizan
1
1978
Flag of Italy.svg Milan
1
1982
Flag of Italy.svg Torino
1
1991
Flag of Italy.svg Udinese
1
1980
Flag of Italy.svg Ascoli
1
1987
Flag of Italy.svg Bari
1
1990
Flag of Austria.svg SC Eisenstadt
1
1984
Flag of Austria.svg First Vienna
1
1931
Flag of the Czech Republic.svg Baník Ostrava
1
1989
Flag of the Czech Republic.svg Tatran Prešov
1
1981
Flag of the Czech Republic.svg ZVL Zilina
2
1974, 1983
Flag of Austria.svg SK Admira Wien
2
1934, 1951
Flag of Austria.svg Wiener AC
1
1931
Flag of Austria.svg Austria Salzburg
1
1971
Flag of Italy.svg Ambrosiana Inter
1
1933
Flag of Italy.svg Lazio
1
1937
Flag of Italy.svg Atalanta
1
1985
Flag of Italy.svg Genoa
1
1990
Flag of the Czech Republic.svg ÚDA Prague
1
1955
Flag of the Czech Republic.svg Slovan Nitra
1
1961
Flag of the Czech Republic.svg Slovan Bratislava
1
1964
Flag of the Czech Republic.svg Jednota Trenčín
1
1966
Flag of the Czech Republic.svg Sklo Union Teplice
1
1969
Flag of the Czech Republic.svg TJ Vítkovice
1
1982
Flag of the Czech Republic.svg Bohemians Prague
1
1987
Flag of Yugoslavia (1946-1992).svg Velež Mostar
1
1976
Flag of Yugoslavia (1946-1992).svg Prishtina
1
1984
Flag of Hungary.svg Csepel SC
1
1981
Flag of Hungary.svg Debreceni MVSC
1
1986
Flag of Hungary.svg Váci Izzó
1
1988
Flag of Hungary.svg BVSC
1
1992
Flag of Romania.svg Rapid București
1
1940

Titles by country

CountryTitles
Flag of Hungary.svg  Hungary 16
Flag of Italy.svg  Italy 11
Flag of the Czech Republic.svg  Czechoslovakia 8
Flag of Austria.svg  Austria 7
Flag of Yugoslavia (1946-1992).svg  Yugoslavia

Top scorers (1927–1940)

By year

[4]

YearPlayerGoalsPlayedAverage
1927 Flag of the Czech Republic.svg Josef Silný 560.83
1928 Flag of Hungary.svg Jozsef Takács II 1061.66
1929 Flag of Hungary.svg István Avar 1071.42
1930 Flag of Italy.svg Giuseppe Meazza 761.16
1931 Flag of Austria.svg Heinrich Hiltl 771.00
1932 Flag of Argentina.svg Renato Cesarini 541.25
1933 Flag of Argentina.svg Raimundo Orsi 541.25
Flag of the Czech Republic.svg František Kloz 41.25
Flag of Italy.svg Giuseppe Meazza 60.83
Flag of Austria.svg Matthias Sindelar 60.83
1934 Flag of Italy.svg Carlo Reguzzoni 1081.28
1935 Flag of Hungary.svg György Sárosi 981.12
1936 Flag of Italy.svg Giuseppe Meazza (3)1061.66
1937 Flag of Hungary.svg György Sárosi 1291.33
1938 Flag of the Czech Republic.svg Josef Bican 1081.25
1939 Flag of Hungary.svg Gyula Zsengellér 961.50
1940 Flag of Hungary.svg György Sárosi (3)623.00

All-time top scorers (1927–1940)

[5]

RankPlayerGoalsPlayedAverage
1 Flag of Hungary.svg György Sárosi 50421.19
2 Flag of Italy.svg Giuseppe Meazza 29271.07
3 Flag of Hungary.svg Gyula Zsengellér 24191.26
4 Flag of Austria.svg Matthias Sindelar 24310.77
5 Flag of Hungary.svg István Avar 19240.79

Top scorers (1951–1992)

By season

SeasonPlayerClubGoals
1951 Flag of Austria.svg Erich Probst Flag of Austria.svg Rapid Wien 5
1955 Flag of Hungary.svg János Molnár Flag of Hungary.svg Vörös Lobogó 9
Flag of Hungary.svg Nándor Hidegkuti Flag of Hungary.svg Vörös Lobogó 9
1956 Flag of Hungary.svg Lajos Csordás Flag of Hungary.svg Vasas 8
1957 Flag of Austria.svg Johann Riegler Flag of Austria.svg Rapid Wien 5
Flag of Hungary.svg Dezső Bundzsák Flag of Hungary.svg Vasas 5
1959 Flag of Hungary.svg Lajos Tichy Flag of Hungary.svg Budapest Honvéd 9
1960 Flag of Yugoslavia (1946-1992).svg Sulejman Rebac Flag of Yugoslavia (1946-1992).svg Velez Mostar 4
1961 Flag of the Czech Republic.svg Milan Dolinský Flag of the Czech Republic.svg Red Star Bratislava 7
Flag of the Czech Republic.svg Viliam Hrnčár Flag of the Czech Republic.svg Slovan Nitra 7
1962 Flag of Denmark.svg Harald Nielsen Flag of Italy.svg Bologna 11
1963 Flag of Hungary.svg Ferenc Machos Flag of Hungary.svg Vasas 7
1964 Flag of the Czech Republic.svg Václav Mašek Flag of the Czech Republic.svg Sparta Prague 7
1965 Flag of Hungary.svg Lajos Puskás Flag of Hungary.svg Vasas 3
1966 Flag of Austria.svg Friedrich Rafreider Flag of Austria.svg Wiener Sport-Club 5
1966–67 Flag of Hungary.svg Antal Dunai Flag of Hungary.svg Újpest 9
1967–68 Flag of Yugoslavia (1946-1992).svg Vojin Lazarević Flag of Yugoslavia (1946-1992).svg Red Star Belgrade 5
1968–69 Flag of the Czech Republic.svg Pavel Stratil Flag of the Czech Republic.svg Sklo Union Teplice 7
1969–70 Flag of Hungary.svg János Farkas Flag of Hungary.svg Vasas 6
1970–71 Flag of Yugoslavia (1946-1992).svg Aloise Renich Flag of Yugoslavia (1946-1992).svg Čelik Zenica 5
1971–72 Flag of Italy.svg Luciano Chiarugi Flag of Italy.svg Fiorentina 5
1972–73 Flag of Yugoslavia (1946-1992).svg Aloise Renich (2) Flag of Yugoslavia (1946-1992).svg Čelik Zenica 4
1973–74 Flag of Hungary.svg Mihai Kyomyuves Flag of Hungary.svg FC Tatabánya 6
1974–75 Flag of the Czech Republic.svg Jaroslav Melichar Flag of the Czech Republic.svg Sklo Union Teplice 3
1975–76 Flag of Austria.svg Kurt Welzl Flag of Austria.svg FC Wacker Innsbruck 6
1976–77 Flag of Hungary.svg István Kovács  [ hu ] Flag of Hungary.svg Vasas 4
1977–78 Flag of Yugoslavia (1946-1992).svg Momčilo Vukotić Flag of Yugoslavia (1946-1992).svg Partizan 3
1979–80 Flag of Italy.svg Nerio Ulivieri Flag of Italy.svg Udinese 4
1980–81 Flag of Hungary.svg Laszlo Lasagne Flag of Hungary.svg Csepel SC 3
1981–82 Flag of the Czech Republic.svg Jiří Šourek Flag of the Czech Republic.svg Vítkovice 3

Mitropa Super Cup Final

Additionally, a "Mitropa Super Cup" was contested in 1989 between the winners of 1988 and 1989. [1]

YearChampionResultRunner-up
1989 Flag of the Czech Republic.svg Baník Ostrava 3–0 Flag of Italy.svg Pisa
1–3
( a.e.t. )

See also

Notes

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    References

    1. 1 2 Karel Stokkermans (2 September 2015). "Mitropa Cup". RSSSF. Retrieved 13 September 2017.
    2. Mitropa Cup History - Ref: IFFHS.de (in German)
    3. Mitropa Cup History - Ref: Radio.cz
    4. "ARFTS – Mitropa Cup 1927–1940 Statistics". Archived from the original on 18 November 2017. Retrieved 17 November 2017.
    5. "ARFTS - Mitropa Cup 1927-1940 Statistics". Archived from the original on 18 November 2017. Retrieved 17 November 2017.