Monophorus perversus

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Monophorus perversus
Monophorus perversus 01.jpg
Dorsal view of a shell of Monophorus perversus
Scientific classification
Kingdom:
Phylum:
Class:
(unranked):
clade Caenogastropoda
clade Hypsogastropoda
Informal group Ptenoglossa
Superfamily:
Family:
Genus:
Species:
M. perversus
Binomial name
Monophorus perversus

Monophorus per versus is a species of minute sea snail with left-handed shell-coiling, a marine gastropod mollusk or micromollusk in the family Triphoridae. [1]

Contents

Distribution

This species is found in the Azores, around Great Britain and in European waters including the Mediterranean Sea.

Description

Apertural view Monophorus perversus 002.jpg
Apertural view

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<i>Monophorus</i> Genus of gastropods

Monophorus is a genus of minute sea snails with left-handed shell-coiling, marine gastropod mollusks or micromollusks in the family Triphoridae.

References

  1. Bouchet, P.; Gofas, S. (2011). Monophorus perversus (Linnaeus, 1758). Accessed through: World Register of Marine Species at http://www.marinespecies.org/aphia.php?p=taxdetails&id=141720 on 16 October 2012