Multnomah Athletic Club

Last updated
Multnomah Athletic Club
MACLogo2020.jpg
2020 MAC Winged M
AbbreviationM.A.C.
FormationFebruary 1891
TypeSocial and recreational club
Registration no.93-0232310
Location
Coordinates 45°31′14″N122°41′34″W / 45.5206°N 122.6927°W / 45.5206; -122.6927 Coordinates: 45°31′14″N122°41′34″W / 45.5206°N 122.6927°W / 45.5206; -122.6927
Membership
17,158 (residential members) [1]
Key people
Robert Torch (president)
Chase McPherson (vice president)
Steve Brown (treasurer)
Reidun Zander (secretary)
Budget (2018)
$40,047,645 [2]
Revenue (2018)
$43,385,690 [2]
Website themac.com

The Multnomah Athletic Club is a private social and athletic club in Portland, Oregon, United States.

Contents

Located in the Goose Hollow neighborhood, the Multnomah Amateur Athletic Club was founded in 1891, and the club has expanded greatly from its beginnings. It now fills two buildings totaling 600,000 square feet (56,000 m2), making it the largest indoor athletic club in the world. [3] [4] It is colloquially referred to as either "The MAC Club" or simply "The MAC". Its emblem is a winged "M". It has approximately 22,000 members and employs nearly 600 staff, according to the club's website.

The club has a capped membership, and holds a lottery every few years to compensate for attrition. Other avenues for joining include a Diversity Admissions Program. [5] The initiation fee is approximately $5500 for an individual member, and monthly dues thereafter are around $298.

Facilities

The entrance to the Multnomah Athletic Club photographed in 2014. Multnomah Athletic Club entrance - Portland, Oregon.JPG
The entrance to the Multnomah Athletic Club photographed in 2014.

The club's primary facility is an eight-level main clubhouse located adjacent to Providence Park, a multipurpose stadium located on land formerly owned by the club, directly behind the park's south end bleachers. Covered parking for more than 600 autos is provided across the street in the club's garage which has a skybridge connecting across the road to the rest of the facilities.

Athletic facilities at the club include: Nine tennis courts, Eight squash courts, Ten racquetball/handball courts, Gymnastics arena, Three gymnasiums including a rock climbing gym, Indoor track, Batting cage, Pilates studio, Exercise and conditioning room with 14,800 square feet (1,370 m2) of space, Three fitness studios with 9,430 square feet (876 m2) total space, and Four locker rooms with over 6400 lockers. The club also has three swimming pools, two with spectator galleries.

Dining facilities include three restaurants, ten private dining rooms and the grand ballroom. Areas for socializing include reading lounge, game room, stadium terrace, sun deck, and junior lounge. Amenities include concierge, the -M-porium retail shop, child care and playschool, salon, massage, and shoe shine/repair.

The club offers a swim team, synchronized swimming, basketball, cycling, dance, decathlon, golf, gymnastics, handball, karate, Pilates, personal training, skiing, squash, soccer, tennis, triathlon, volleyball, hiking, and yoga. The clubhouse is also host to a variety of local, regional, and national sporting competitions throughout the year, and has been a venue for international championships on more than one occasion.

Notable members and staff

Olympic silver medalist Suzanne Zimmerman was a Multnomah Athletic Club member. Suzanne Zimmerman 1948.jpg
Olympic silver medalist Suzanne Zimmerman was a Multnomah Athletic Club member.

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References

  1. "Membership". themac.com. Multnomah Athletic Club. Retrieved 6 August 2018.
  2. 1 2 "Nonprofit Explorer; Multnomah Athletic Club". propublica.org. ProPublica. Retrieved 6 August 2018.
  3. "History - MAC". themac.com. Retrieved 2020-02-09.
  4. Anderson, Heather Arndt (2015-12-17). "Inside the Best Portland Restaurant Where You'll Never Get to Eat". Eater Portland. Retrieved 2020-02-09.
  5. "Membership - MAC". themac.com. Retrieved 2020-07-01.