Owari Domain

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Nagoya Domain
(1871)
名古屋藩
Owari Domain
(1610–1871)
尾張藩
Domain of Japan
1610–1871
Capital Nagoya Castle
  Type Daimyō
Historical eraEdo period
 Established
1610
 Disestablished
1871
Today part of Aichi Prefecture
Nagoya Castle was the administrative seat of the Owari Domain Nagoya Castle 1979.1.48P01B.jpg
Nagoya Castle was the administrative seat of the Owari Domain

The Owari Domain (尾張藩, Owari han) was a feudal domain of Japan in the Edo period. Located in what is now the western part of Aichi Prefecture, it encompassed parts of Owari, Mino, and Shinano provinces. Its headquarters were at Nagoya Castle. At its peak, it was rated at 619,500 koku , and was the largest holding of the Tokugawa clan apart from the shogunal lands. The Daimyō of Owari was the Owari Tokugawa family, the first in rank among the gosanke . The domain was also known as Nagoya Domain (名古屋藩)

Contents

History

Until the end of the Battle of Sekigahara in September 1600, the area that makes up the Owari Domain was under the control of Fukushima Masanori, head of nearby Kiyosu Castle. After the battle, however, Masanori was transferred to the Hiroshima Domain in Aki Province.

Leaders

OrderNameRuling yearsLineage
1 Tokugawa Yoshinao 1607–16509th son of Tokugawa Ieyasu
2 Tokugawa Mitsutomo 1650–1693Eldest son of Yoshinao
3 Tokugawa Tsunanari 1693–1699Eldest son of Mitsutomo
4 Tokugawa Yoshimichi 1699–17139th son of Tsunanari
5 Tokugawa Gorōta 1713Eldest son of Yoshimichi
6 Tokugawa Tsugutomo 1713–1730Uncle of Gorōta, 11th son (adopted) of Tsunanari
7 Tokugawa Muneharu 1730–1739Younger brother of Tsugutomo, 19th son (adopted) of Tsunanari
8 Tokugawa Munekatsu 1739–1761Grandson of Mitsutomo (adopted)
9 Tokugawa Munechika 1761–17992nd son of Munekatsu
10 Tokugawa Naritomo 1799–1827Nephew of Tokugawa Ienari (adopted)
11 Tokugawa Nariharu 1827–1839Cousin of Naritomo, 19th son of Ienari (adopted)
12 Tokugawa Naritaka 1839–1845Older brother of Nariharu, 12th son of Ienari (adopted)
13 Tokugawa Yoshitsugu 1845–18497th son of Tokugawa Narimasa, head of the Tayasu-Tokugawa house (adopted)
14 Tokugawa Yoshikumi 1849–18582nd son of Matsudaira Yoshitatsu, ruler of the Takasu Domain
15 Tokugawa Mochinaga 1858–1863Younger brother of Yoshikumi
16 Tokugawa Yoshinori 1863–1869Uncle of Mochinaga
17 Tokugawa Yoshikatsu 1869New name of Yoshikumi

Sub-domains

The Owari Domain was supported by the Yanagawa Domain in Mutsu Province and the Takasu Domain in Mino Province.

Yanagawa Domain

The Yanagawa Domain provided 30,000 koku to the Owari Domain annually from 1683 to 1730, when Tokugawa Muneharu came to power and dissolved the domain.

Takasu Domain

The Takasu Domain also provided 30,000 koku to the Owari Domain annually from 1700 to 1870, when it was merged with the Owari Domain.

See also

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