Patriarch Nicholas I of Alexandria

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Patriarch Nicholas I served as Greek Patriarch of Alexandria between 1210 and 1243.

Relations with the Church of Rome

Like his predecessor, Nicholas I maintained communion with the See of Rome. He ordained a Latin rite priest and at the invitation of Innocent III of Rome, sent representatives to participate in the Fourth Lateran Council (1215). [1]

In 1218–1219, Crusaders captured Damietta as a base to invade and liberate the Christians of Egypt from the Ayyubid Muslims. After a crushing defeat in 1221, Crusaders surrendered Damietta and signed an 8-year truce. Native Egyptian Christians underwent renewed persecution and tortures by the Muslims in retaliation. Patriarch Nicholas died in deep poverty, 6 years before Crusaders returned to briefly retake Damietta.

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Nicholas I may refer to:

Patriarch Nicholas I may refer to:

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Patriarch Nicholas may refer to:

Patriarch Nicholas of Alexandria may refer to:

References

  1. Steven Runciman. The Eastern Schism. (Oxford, 1955). p. 99.
Preceded by
Mark III
Greek Patriarch of Alexandria
12101243
Succeeded by
Gregory I