Polygamy in Cameroon

Last updated

Polygyny is legal in Cameroon , contracted frequently for reasons of both status and wealth. It has been reported that polygamy is most often found in rural areas of the country. It has been said that polygamous unions are slowly beginning to decrease, mainly due to social and economic reasons. There is no limit on how many wives a man can take, which is rare for most nations that allow polygyny. [1]

Related Research Articles

Marriage Culturally recognised union between people

Marriage, also called matrimony or wedlock, is a culturally recognised union between people, called spouses, that establishes rights and obligations between them, as well as between them and their children, and between them and their in-laws. The definition of marriage varies between cultures and religions, and within a culture or religion, over time. It has expanded and also constricted in terms of who and what is encompassed. Typically, it is an institution in which interpersonal relationships, usually sexual, are acknowledged or sanctioned. In some cultures, marriage is recommended or considered to be compulsory before pursuing any sexual activity. When defined broadly, marriage is considered a cultural universal. A marriage ceremony is called a wedding.

Polygyny Mating system in which the male partner may have multiple partners

Polygyny is the most common and accepted form of polygamy, entailing the marriage of a man with several women. Most countries that permit polygyny today are Muslim-majority countries.

Polyandry Mating system in which the female partner may have multiple partners

Polyandry is a form of polygamy in which a woman takes two or more husbands at the same time. Polyandry is contrasted with polygyny, involving one male and two or more females. If a marriage involves a plural number of "husbands and wives" participants of each gender, then it can be called polygamy, group or conjoint marriage. In its broadest use, polyandry refers to sexual relations with multiple males within or without marriage.

Polygamy is the practice of marrying multiple spouses. When a man is married to more than one wife at the same time, sociologists call this polygyny. When a woman is married to more than one husband at a time, it is called polyandry. A marriage including multiple husbands and wives can be called a group marriage.

Bountiful, British Columbia Unofficial Settlement in British Columbia, Canada

Bountiful is a settlement in the Creston Valley of southeastern British Columbia, Canada, near Cranbrook and Creston. The closest community is Lister, British Columbia.

Polygyny in Islam

Traditional Sunni and Shia Islamic marital jurisprudence allows Muslim men to be married to multiple women — up to four at any point in time.

Polygamy is the practice of having more than one spouse. Specifically, polygyny is the practice of one man taking more than one wife while polyandry is the practice of one woman taking more than one husband. Polygamy is a common marriage pattern in some parts of the world. In North America, polygamy has not been a culturally normative or legally recognized institution since the continent's colonization by Europeans.

Polygamy is "the practice or custom of having more than one wife or husband at the same time." Polygamy has been practiced by many cultures throughout history.

Polygamous unions are legal in the United Arab Emirates Muslim polygamy, in practice and law, differs greatly throughout the Islamic world. In some Muslim countries, polygamy is relatively common, while in most others, it is often rare or non-existent. Polygamy is most widely practiced by Muslims in West Africa, as well as in certain traditionalist Arabian states such as Saudi Arabia and the United Arab Emirates.

Polygamy is legally permissible according to the law of 1961, but restricted, in the Muslim majority nation of Pakistan. Only males adhering to the Islamic faith are legally allowed to enter into polygamous unions, with a maximum of four wives at one time. Legally, Muslims and Christians are allowed to enter Polygamous marriage. However it is illegal for Hindus as per the Hindu marriage law.

Like many nations in the Muslim world, polygyny is legal in Bahrain. However, according to the Bahrain Center for Human Rights' write-up on women's rights in Bahrain at the present time, polygamy is only practiced by a minority of Bahraini citizens, though unlike most nations, levels of education and areas of habitation do not play a strong role in statistics composed of citizens practicing polygamy.

Polygamy in Nigeria

Under civil law, Nigeria does not recognize polygamous unions. However, 12 out of the 36 Nigerian states recognize polygamous marriages as being equivalent to monogamous marriages. All twelve states are governed by Sharia Law. The states, which are all northern, include the states of Bauchi, Borno, Gombe, Jigawa, Kaduna, Kano, Katsina, Kebbi, Niger, Sokoto, Yobe, and Zamfara which allows for a man to take more than one wife.

Tunisia became the first Arab state to formally abolish polygamy in 1956, the same year it gained official independence. In current times, Tunisia is still one of the very few predominantly Islamic nations that has legally banned polygamy. Turkey, which is non-Arab but predominantly Muslim, banned the practice in 1926, while the Kurdistan region in Iraq banned polygamy in 2008.

While polygyny is legal in the Central African Republic, it has been reported that the more well-educated women living in the nation have tended to oppose it, favoring a monogamous marriage instead. The country's legal code allows a man to take up to four wives, but he must decide on the nature of his future marriages before is allowed to contract his first. In other words, if a man plans to marry one to three more women in the future, he must make this clear: otherwise, he will not be allowed to marry additional women if he later changes his mind.

The practice of what is usually called polygamy, enjoys de facto and de jure legality in Kenya. It is to be understood as polygyny, however. It states in the Kenyan constitution that a man can marry more than one wife.

The Republic of Afghanistan, which is an Islamic Republic under Sharia Law, allows for polygyny. Afghan men may take up to four wives, as Islam allows for such. A man must treat all of his wives equally; however, it has been reported that these regulations are rarely followed. While the Qur’an states that a man is allowed a maximum of four wives, there is an unspecified number of women allowed to be his ‘concubines’. These women are considered unprotected and need a man as a guardian.

Legality of polygamy

The legal status of polygamy varies widely around the world. Polygyny is legal in 58 out of nearly 200 sovereign states, the vast majority of them being Muslim-majority countries in Africa and Asia. Polyandry is illegal in virtually every country. A number of countries permit polygyny among Muslims in their communities. Some countries that permit polygyny have restrictions, such as requiring the first wife to give her consent.

Polygamy has three specific forms:

Janet Bennion American anthropologist

Janet Benson Bennion is Professor of Anthropology at Lyndon State College, Vermont, United States. She specializes in gender dynamics in Mormon fundamentalist communities which practice polygamy. Bennion is one of the world’s leading ethnographers of North American plural marriage. She has raised the question of decriminalization of plural marriage in a variety of radio and television forums and several international scholar venues at Brandeis University and the European University Institute in Florence, Italy.

Polygamy as polygyny in most of Syria is restricted. After the outbreak of the Syrian Civil War, the Kurdish Rojava inhabited regions outlawed polygamy in the northeastern parts of Syria that fell under their de facto control.

References

  1. "In Modern Cameroon polygamy doesn't pay". Archived from the original on 10 February 2009. Retrieved 9 May 2020.