Quarterback scramble

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A quarterback scramble in the 2007 Hawaii Bowl. 2007 Hawaii Bowl - Boise State University vs East Carolina University - Patrick Pinkney running.jpg
A quarterback scramble in the 2007 Hawaii Bowl.

A quarterback scramble or scramble is an impromptu maneuver or run in gridiron football by a quarterback. If a quarterback is under pressure by an opposing team's defense, he may run forward, backward, or laterally in an attempt to avoid being tackled behind the line of scrimmage—a quarterback sack. A scramble is not usually a designed play (designed quarterback run plays include the quarterback keeper and bootleg play), but instead is the action of a quarterback to avoid being sacked by the defense or an improvised run forward to gain yardage if an opportunity presents itself.

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Washington Football Team quarterback Taylor Heinicke (#4) sliding after a scramble to avoid injury. Taylor Heinicke scramble 2021.jpg
Washington Football Team quarterback Taylor Heinicke (#4) sliding after a scramble to avoid injury.

Due to the risk of injury or fumbling the ball while scrambling, quarterbacks are advised to slide down to avoid unnecessary hits after picking up the necessary yardage. NFL coach Zac Taylor is quoted as saying "There is a time to put your head down and go get that first down. Then there are some times we just have to assess the situation and be smart and keep us on pace for the next drive." [1]

Scrambling is mostly forbidden in six-man football, which requires that the quarterback relinquish the ball before it crosses the line of scrimmage.

See also

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Cornerback Position in gridiron football

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Quarterback sack Action in gridiron football

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Bootleg play Play in American football

In American football, a bootleg play is a play in which the quarterback runs with the ball in the direction of either sideline behind the line of scrimmage. This can be accompanied by a play action, or fake hand off of the ball to a running back running the opposite direction.

A formation in football refers to the position players line up in before the start of a down. There are both offensive and defensive formations and there are many formations in both categories. Sometimes, formations are referred to as packages.

Passing pocket American football term

The passing pocket, or the pocket, is a term used in American football to describe the area in the backfield created on a passing play where the offensive line forms a wall of protection around the quarterback. This allows him adequate time to find an open receiver and to pass the ball. The offensive line will drop back slightly, creating a U-shaped protected area for the quarterback to find an open receiver and pass the ball.

A trick play, also known as a gadget play, gimmick play or trickeration, is a play in gridiron football that uses deception and unorthodox tactics to fool the opposing team. A trick play is often risky, offering the potential for a large gain or a touchdown if it is successful, but with the chance of a significant loss of yards or a turnover if not. Trick plays are rarely used not only because of the riskiness, but also to maintain the element of surprise for when they are used.

In American football, a play is a close-to-the-ground plan of action or strategy used to move the ball down the field. A play begins at either the snap from the center or at kickoff. Most commonly, plays occur at the snap during a down. These plays range from basic to very intricate. Football players keep a record of these plays in a playbook.

Pass rush American football defensive maneuver

On defense in American football, a pass rush is charging across the line of scrimmage towards the quarterback in an effort to stop or "sack" them. The purpose is tackling, hurrying or flushing the quarterback out of their protective pocket or the play's design.

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Yards from scrimmage is a gridiron football statistical measure. In the game of football, progress is measured by advancing the football towards the opposing team's goal line. Progress can be made during play by the offensive team by advancing the ball from the point of progress at the start of play known as the line of scrimmage. When the offensive team advances the ball by rushing the football, the player who carries the ball is given credit for the difference in progress measured in rushing yards. When the offensive team advances the ball by pass reception, the player who catches the reception is given credit for the difference in progress measured in reception yards. Although the ball may also be advanced by penalty these yards are not considered yards from scrimmage. Progress lost via quarterback sacks are classified variously by league of play with rules having changed over time within some leagues. The total of rushing yards and receiving yards is known as yards from scrimmage. This definition of yardage differs from total offense which gives credit for passing yardage to the person throwing the football rather than receiving the football.

The following terms are used in American football, both conventional and indoor. Some of these terms are also in use in Canadian football; for a list of terms unique to that code, see Glossary of Canadian football.

Quarterback keeper American football play

A quarterback keeper or keeper in American football is a designed play in which the quarterback does not pass or hand off the ball to another player and instead rushes forward with it in an effort to gain yardage. The play typically is run in instances where only a few yards are needed to gain a first down or touchdown, due to the threat of injury to the quarterback and most quarterbacks' ineffectiveness at running the ball when compared with a running back or fullback; however, this play is called more often with dual-threat quarterbacks. Variations include a bootleg, quarterback sneak, quarterback sweep or quarterback "power".

References

  1. Fowler, Jeremy (2021-11-30). "Why the QB slide matters -- and how Russell Wilson, Kyler Murray became the NFL's best". ESPN.com. Retrieved 2022-05-15.