Spy (gridiron football)

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In American football, a spy is a defensive player assigned to cover an offensive backfield player man-to-man when they are expected to engage in a running play, but the offensive player does not run with the ball immediately.

This strategy is generally used with "dual-threat" quarterbacks who may be expected to run on their own after expected passing plays break down, with the defensive player floating near the line of scrimmage, following the quarterback's movements. [1]

Spies are also sometimes known as "keys". [2] Generally, spies are linebackers. [3]

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References

  1. "Spying the Quarterback". Sporting Charts. Retrieved 17 January 2017.CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  2. "Football Outsiders Glossary: General Football Terms". Football Outsiders. Retrieved 17 January 2017.CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  3. Theismann, Joe (2003). The Complete Idiot's Guide to Football. Penguin. p. 179. ISBN   0786548363.