Hand-off

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Running back Chris Johnson of the East Carolina Pirates (#5) receiving the handoff and rushing the ball during the 2007 Hawaii Bowl 2007 Hawaii Bowl - Boise State University vs East Carolina University - Chris Johnson handoff.jpg
Running back Chris Johnson of the East Carolina Pirates (#5) receiving the handoff and rushing the ball during the 2007 Hawaii Bowl

In American football, a hand-off is the act of handing the ball directly from one player to another, i. e. without it leaving the first player's hands. [1] Most rushing plays on offense begin with a handoff from the quarterback to another running back. The biggest risk with any hand-off is the chance of fumble on the exchange. [2] A hand-off can occur in any direction. Sometimes called a "switch" in touch football. Alternately spelled without the hyphen; i.e., "handoff".

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References

  1. "The Quarterback's Stance, Drop Back, and Hand Off". dummies.com.
  2. Schaeffer, Jeffrey W. (2003). Football the Basics: Strategies and Techniques. ISBN   9781412005128.