Halfback option play

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The halfback option play is an unorthodox play in American and Canadian football. It resembles a normal running play, but the running back has the option to throw a pass to another eligible receiver before crossing the line of scrimmage.

The key to the play is fooling the defensive players, primarily the defensive backs. If the linebackers and/or the defensive line are fooled and believe the ball carrier is attempting a run, they will pursue the runner, abandoning their pass defense responsibilities and thereby leaving pass receivers uncovered. If the defensive backs are not fooled, the running back carrying the ball does have the option to run, instead of risking an incomplete pass or an interception. This play is not as popular as it once was as defensive players are expected to cover receivers until the football crosses the line of scrimmage on running plays.

The running play that halfback options usually resemble is a sweep play. Sometimes the quarterback will run out of the backfield and become a receiving option for the running back. This can be effective because the quarterback usually does very little after handing off or pitching the ball to the running back on most plays, and the defense might not be expecting him to be used as an active receiver. In the National Football League, if the quarterback starts the play under center, then he is ineligible as a receiver; the quarterback must start from the shotgun to receive a pass.

The halfback option play usually has limited success and is not commonly used, especially in the NFL. The play almost completely relies on the element of surprise and better coaching has resulted in defensive backs being instructed to stay in coverage until the running back with the ball crosses the line of scrimmage. Another reason is that the passing ability of most running backs is usually poor in relation to the passing ability of a quarterback. However, certain teams and players do successfully run the option one to a few times a season; used sparingly it can be effective to make a game-changing play. In modern professional football history a halfback has only thrown more than one touchdown in two games: utility player Gene Mingo of the Denver Broncos threw two touchdowns as a halfback in an American Football League game against the Buffalo Bills in 1961; and running back Walter Payton of the Chicago Bears threw two touchdowns in a 1983 NFL game against the New Orleans Saints. [1]

The halfback option play is an integral part of the wildcat offense, which involves the halfback receiving a direct snap. [2]

Notable instances

There have been many notable cases where the halfback option pass has been used with great success.

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References

  1. "Chicago Bears at New Orleans Saints - September 18th, 1983". Pro-Football-Reference.com.
  2. "Video: Tim Tebow In New York Jets' Offensive Coordinator Tony Sparano wildcat offense". Business Insider. Business Insider. Retrieved 9 August 2019.
  3. Oberheide.org Hargiss's Option Play
  4. "My Super Bowl: Roger Staubach". www.nfl.com.
  5. "LaDainian Tomlinson Career Passing Touchdown Log". Pro-Football-Reference.com . Sports Reference . Retrieved January 14, 2021.
  6. Bell, Jarrett. Odd formations could become latest fad across NFL. USA Today. 24 September 2008.