Queen's Commendation for Valuable Service in the Air

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Queen's Commendation for Valuable Service in the Air
King's Commendation for Valuable Service in the Air.png
Obverse of the civilian badge
TypeDecoration for meritorious service
Awarded forService while flying
DescriptionPin back badge / Ribbon device
Presented bythe United Kingdom and the Commonwealth
EligibilityBoth service personnel and civilians
StatusDiscontinued in 1994
Established1942
TotalCirca 3,000
Mentioned in Dispatches emblem.png
Bronze oak leaf device of military recipients

The Queen's Commendation for Valuable Service in the Air, formerly the King's Commendation for Valuable Service in the Air, was a merit award for flying service awarded by the United Kingdom between 1942 and 1994. It was replaced by the Queen’s Commendation for Bravery in the Air and the Queen's Commendation for Valuable Service. [1]

Contents

Criteria

The King's Commendation for Valuable Service in the Air was first awarded in 1942 to reward both meritorious and gallant service while flying, not in the face of an enemy, that did not reach the standard required for the Air Force Cross or the Air Force Medal. [2] It could be awarded to both members of the British and Commonwealth Armed Forces and to civilians. It was renamed the Queen's Commendation for Valuable Service in the Air in 1952, following the accession of Queen Elizabeth II to the throne. [3]

Appearance

Service personnel wear a bronze oak leaf device on the ribbon of the appropriate campaign medal, in the same way as those mentioned in dispatches. A smaller version of the oak leaf is attached to the ribbon when worn alone. Where no campaign medal is awarded, the oak leaf is worn directly on the coat after any medal ribbons. A recipient of both a King’s Commendation for Valuable Service in the Air and a mention in dispatches can wear two oak leaves on one ribbon. [2]

In 1945 a special badge was introduced for civilian recipients. Designed by Percy Metcalfe, and approved by King George VI in September 1945, [4] it is silver and consists of two raised wings creating an oval, surmounted by a crown and the words FOR VALUABLE SERVICE. It measures 1.1 inches (28 mm) in height and 0.7 inches (18 mm) wide. [5] It is worn on the coat immediately below any medals or medal ribbons or, in civil airline uniform, on the panel of the left breast pocket. If a recipient has no medals, the badge is worn in the position in which a single ribbon would be worn. [6] The reverse is plain, except for the attachment pin and, in some cases, a registration number.

Although renamed the Queen's Commendation for Valuable Service in the Air in 1952, [7] this did not lead to a change of design.

All recipients also received a certificate, signed by the appropriate government minister. [4]

Recipients

Approximately 3,000 Commendations for Valuable Service in the Air were awarded, including to service personnel and civilians. [8] Among the recipients were a number of civilian, RAF and RN test pilots who received the award in recognition of extraordinary flying during extreme conditions.

King's and Queen's Commendation awards

This table summarises the various King's and Queen's Commendations awarded by the United Kingdom:

PeriodFor BraveryFor Bravery (Air)For valuable serviceFor valuable service (Air)
1939 - 1952 [6] King's Commendation for
Brave Conduct
King’s Commendation for
Valuable Service in the Air
1952 - 1994 [7] Queen's Commendation for
Brave Conduct
Queen’s Commendation for
Valuable Service in the Air
From 1994 [18] Queen's Commendation for
Bravery
Queen's Commendation for
Bravery in the Air
Queen's Commendation for
Valuable Service

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The Queen's Commendation for Bravery and the Queen's Commendation for Bravery in the Air are United Kingdom awards, open to both military personnel and civilians. They were established in 1994, when the award of the Queen's Commendation for Brave Conduct and the Queen's Commendation for Valuable Service in the Air were discontinued.

Queens Commendation for Brave Conduct Award

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Meritorious Service Medal (United Kingdom) British military decoration

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Queens Commendation for Valuable Service Award

The Queen's Commendation for Valuable Service is a British military award for meritorious service in an operational theatre. It was established in 1994, when the award of the Queen's Commendation for Brave Conduct and the Queen's Commendation for Valuable Service in the Air were discontinued.

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References

  1. "London Gazette: 12 August 1994 Issue:53760 Page:11527".
  2. 1 2 Peter Duckers. British Gallantry Awards 1855 – 2000. pp. 56. Published by Shire Publications, Oxford, 2010. ISBN   978-0-7478-0516-8.
  3. Change to "Queen's Commendation" not announced in London Gazette, but used from "London Gazette: 30 May 1952 Supplement: 39554 Page:2950".
  4. 1 2 P E Abbott & J M A Tamplin. British Gallantry Awards. 1981. pp. 303–304. Published by Nimrod Dix & Co, London, 1981. ISBN   0-902633-74-0
  5. King’s Commendation for Valuable Service in the Air, Imperial War Museum collections.
  6. 1 2 "London Gazette: 24 July 1951 Supplement: 39294 Page:4035".
  7. 1 2 "London Gazette: 14 January 1958 Supplement: 41285 Page:365".
  8. No complete figures have been published. British Gallantry Awards by Abbott & Tamplin, page 304, show numbers awarded for selected years, indicating an average of circa 60 a year over the 52 years of the award.
  9. "London Gazette: 31 December 1948 Supplement: 38493 Page:32".
  10. Guinness World Records. "First landing on an aircraft carrier". Guinnessworldrecords.com. Retrieved 14 November 2014.
  11. Luke Jones (14 November 2014). "Eric 'Winkle' Brown: The man who seemed not to notice danger". BBC . Retrieved 6 February 2015.
  12. "London Gazette: 31 December 1954 Issue:40366 Page:34".
  13. "London Gazette: 28 December 1962 Issue:42870 Page:31".
  14. Laker crew honoured, Flight International, 26 February 1970, p. 291
  15. "No. 45042". The London Gazette (Supplement). 13 February 1970. p. 1958..
  16. "No. 49375". The London Gazette (Supplement). 10 June 1983. p. 28.
  17. "No. 52767". The London Gazette (Supplement). 30 December 1991. p. 27.Ogden's name was erroneously missed from published supplement.
  18. "Medals: campaigns, descriptions and eligibility". Ministry of Defence Medal Office. Retrieved 11 June 2018.