Royal Victorian Order

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Royal Victorian Order
Stervan de Koninklijke Orde van Victoria.jpg
Breast Star of Knights/Dames Grand Cross of the Royal Victorian Order
Awarded by the monarch of the United Kingdom and the Dominions (1896–1952), Commonwealth realms (since 1952)
Type Dynastic order
Established21 April 1896
MottoVictoria
EligibilityAll living citizens of the Commonwealth realms
Awarded forPersonal service to the sovereign
StatusCurrently constituted
Founder Queen Victoria
Sovereign Elizabeth II
Grand Master Anne, Princess Royal
Chancellor The Earl Peel
Grades
  • Knight/Dame Grand Cross (GCVO)
  • Knight/Dame Commander (KCVO/DCVO)
  • Commander (CVO)
  • Lieutenant (LVO)
  • Member (MVO)
Precedence
Next (higher) Dependent on state
Next (lower) Dependent on state
UK Royal Victorian Order ribbon.svg
Ribbon of an ordinary member of the order
UK Royal Victorian Order honorary member ribbon.svg
Ribbon of an honorary member of the order

The Royal Victorian Order (French : Ordre royal de Victoria) [n 1] is a dynastic order of knighthood established in 1896 by Queen Victoria. It recognises distinguished personal service to the monarch of the Commonwealth realms, [1] members of the monarch's family, or to any viceroy or senior representative of the monarch. [2] [3] The present monarch, Queen Elizabeth II, is the sovereign of the order, the order's motto is Victoria, and its official day is 20 June. [n 2] The order's chapel is the Savoy Chapel in London.

French language Romance language

French is a Romance language of the Indo-European family. It descended from the Vulgar Latin of the Roman Empire, as did all Romance languages. French evolved from Gallo-Romance, the spoken Latin in Gaul, and more specifically in Northern Gaul. Its closest relatives are the other langues d'oïl—languages historically spoken in northern France and in southern Belgium, which French (Francien) has largely supplanted. French was also influenced by native Celtic languages of Northern Roman Gaul like Gallia Belgica and by the (Germanic) Frankish language of the post-Roman Frankish invaders. Today, owing to France's past overseas expansion, there are numerous French-based creole languages, most notably Haitian Creole. A French-speaking person or nation may be referred to as Francophone in both English and French.

Queen Victoria British monarch who reigned 1837–1901

Victoria was Queen of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland from 20 June 1837 until her death. On 1 May 1876, she adopted the additional title of Empress of India.

Commonwealth realm Sovereign state within the Commonwealth of Nations that has Elizabeth II or her successors as its monarch

A Commonwealth realm is a sovereign state in which Queen Elizabeth II is the reigning constitutional monarch and head of state. Each realm functions as an independent co-equal kingdom from the other realms. As of 2019, there are 16 Commonwealth realms: Antigua and Barbuda, Australia, The Bahamas, Barbados, Belize, Canada, Grenada, Jamaica, New Zealand, Papua New Guinea, Saint Kitts and Nevis, Saint Lucia, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, Solomon Islands, Tuvalu, and the United Kingdom. All 16 Commonwealth realms are members of the Commonwealth of Nations, an intergovernmental organisation of 53 member states. Elizabeth II is Head of the Commonwealth.

Contents

There is no limit on the number of individuals honoured at any grade, [1] and admission remains at the sole discretion of the monarch, [1] with each of the order's five grades and one medal with three levels representing different levels of service. While all those honoured may use the prescribed styles of the order—the top two grades grant titles of knighthood, and all grades accord distinct post-nominal letters—the Royal Victorian Order's precedence amongst other honours differs from realm to realm and admission to some grades may be barred to citizens of those realms by government policy.

Post-nominal letters, also called post-nominal initials, post-nominal titles or designatory letters, are letters placed after a person's name to indicate that that individual holds a position, academic degree, accreditation, office, military decoration, or honour, or is a member of a religious institute or fraternity. An individual may use several different sets of post-nominal letters, but in some contexts it may be customary to limit the number of sets to one or just a few. The order in which post-nominals are listed after a name is based on rules of precedence and what is appropriate for a given situation. Post-nominal letters are one of the main types of name suffix. In contrast, pre-nominal letters precede the name rather than following it.

Creation

Queen Victoria in 1897, the year after she founded the Royal Victorian Order Queen Victoria (Elliott & Fry).png
Queen Victoria in 1897, the year after she founded the Royal Victorian Order

Prior to the close of the 19th century, most general honours within the British Empire were bestowed by the sovereign on the advice of her British ministers, who sometimes forwarded advice from ministers of the Crown in the Dominions and colonies (appointments to the then most senior orders of chivalry, the Most Noble Order of the Garter and the Most Ancient and Most Noble Order of the Thistle, had been made on ministerial advice since the 18th century and were not restored to the personal gift of the sovereign until 1946 and 1947, respectively [4] ). Queen Victoria thus established on 21 April 1896 the Royal Victorian Order as a junior and personal order of knighthood that allowed her to bestow directly to an empire-wide community honours for personal services. [1] [2] [5] [6] The organisation was founded a year preceding Victoria's Diamond Jubilee, so as to give the Queen time to complete a list of first inductees. The order's official day was made 20 June of each year, marking the anniversary of Queen Victoria's accession to the throne. [6]

British Empire States and dominions ruled by the United Kingdom

The British Empire comprised the dominions, colonies, protectorates, mandates and other territories ruled or administered by the United Kingdom and its predecessor states. It originated with the overseas possessions and trading posts established by England between the late 16th and early 18th centuries. At its height, it was the largest empire in history and, for over a century, was the foremost global power. By 1913, the British Empire held sway over 412 million people, 23% of the world population at the time, and by 1920, it covered 35,500,000 km2 (13,700,000 sq mi), 24% of the Earth's total land area. As a result, its political, legal, linguistic and cultural legacy is widespread. At the peak of its power, the phrase "the empire on which the sun never sets" was often used to describe the British Empire, because its expanse around the globe meant that the sun was always shining on at least one of its territories.

Advice, in constitutional law, is formal, usually binding, instruction given by one constitutional officer of state to another. Especially in parliamentary systems of government, heads of state often act on the basis of advice issued by prime ministers or other government ministers. For example, in constitutional monarchies, the monarch usually appoints Ministers of the Crown on the advice of his or her prime minister.

Minister of the Crown is a formal constitutional term used in Commonwealth realms to describe a minister to the reigning sovereign or their viceroy. The term indicates that the minister serves at His/Her Majesty's pleasure, and advises the sovereign or viceroy on how to exercise the Crown prerogatives relative to the minister's department or ministry.

In 1902, King Edward VII created the Royal Victorian Chain "as a personal decoration for royal personages and a few eminent British subjects" and it was the highest class of the Royal Victorian Order. [7] It is today distinct from the order, though it is officially issued by the chancery of the Royal Victorian Order.

Edward VII King of the United Kingdom and the British Dominions and Emperor of India 1901-1910

Edward VII was King of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland and Emperor of India from 22 January 1901 until his death in 1910.

Royal Victorian Chain

The Royal Victorian Chain is a decoration instituted in 1902 by King Edward VII as a personal award of the monarch. It ranks above the Royal Victorian Order, with which it is often associated but not officially related. Originally reserved for members of the Royal Family, the chain is a distinct award conferred only upon the highest dignitaries, including foreign monarchs, heads of state, and high-ranking individuals such as the Archbishop of Canterbury.

Chancery is a general term for a medieval writing office, responsible for the production of official documents. The title of chancellor, for the head of the office, came to be held by important ministers in a number of states, and remains the title of the heads of government in modern Germany and Austria. Chancery hand is a term for various types of handwriting associated with chanceries.

After 1931, when the Statute of Westminster came into being and the Dominions of the British Empire became independent states, equal in status to Britain, [8] [9] the Royal Victorian Order remained an honour open to all the King's realms; thus, as with the monarch who conferred it, the order ceased to be purely British. [1] The order was open to foreigners from its inception, the Prefect of Alpes-Maritimes and the Mayor of Nice being the first to receive the honour in 1896. [1]

Statute of Westminster 1931 United Kingdom legislation

The Statute of Westminster 1931 is an Act of the Parliament of the United Kingdom whose modified versions are now domestic law within Australia and Canada; it has been repealed in New Zealand and implicitly in former Dominions that are no longer Commonwealth realms. Passed on 11 December 1931, the act, either immediately or upon ratification, effectively both established the legislative independence of the self-governing Dominions of the British Empire from the United Kingdom and bound them all to seek each other's approval for changes to monarchical titles and the common line of succession. It thus became a statutory embodiment of the principles of equality and common allegiance to the Crown set out in the Balfour Declaration of 1926. As the statute removed nearly all of the British parliament's authority to legislate for the Dominions, it had the effect of making the Dominions largely sovereign nations in their own right. It was a crucial step in the development of the Dominions as separate states.

The Dominions were the semi-independent polities under the British Crown that constituted the British Empire, beginning with Canadian Confederation in 1867. "Dominion status" was a constitutional term of art used to signify an independent Commonwealth realm; they included Canada, Australia, New Zealand, Newfoundland, South Africa, and the Irish Free State, and then from the late 1940s also India, Pakistan, and Ceylon. The Balfour Declaration of 1926 recognised the Dominions as "autonomous Communities within the British Empire", and the 1931 Statute of Westminster confirmed their full legislative independence.

Alpes-Maritimes Department of France in Provence-Alpes-Côte dAzur

Alpes-Maritimes is a department of France located in the extreme southeast corner of the country, near the border with Italy and on the Mediterranean coast. Part of the Provence-Alpes-Côte d'Azur region, it had a population of 1,080,771 in 2013.

Officers and grades

The reigning monarch is at the apex of the Royal Victorian Order as its Sovereign, followed by the Grand Master; the latter position was created in 1937 and was occupied by Queen Elizabeth (later the Queen Mother) from that date until her death in 2002. Queen Elizabeth II then appointed her daughter, Anne, Princess Royal, [10] to the position in 2007. Below the Grand Master are five officials of the organisation: the Chancellor, held by the Lord Chamberlain; the Secretary, held by the Keeper of the Privy Purse and Treasurer to the Queen; the Registrar, held by the Secretary to the Central Chancery of the Orders of Knighthood; the Chaplain, held by the Chaplain of the Queen's Chapel of the Savoy; and the Genealogist. [11]

A monarch is a sovereign head of state in a monarchy. A monarch may exercise the highest authority and power in the state, or others may wield that power on behalf of the monarch. Typically a monarch either personally inherits the lawful right to exercise the state's sovereign rights or is selected by an established process from a family or cohort eligible to provide the nation's monarch. Alternatively, an individual may become monarch by conquest, acclamation or a combination of means. A monarch usually reigns for life or until abdication.

Grand Master (order) head of a knighthood

Grand Master is a title of the supreme head of various orders, including chivalric orders such as military orders and dynastic orders of knighthood.

Queen Elizabeth The Queen Mother Queen consort of King George VI, mother of Queen Elizabeth II

Elizabeth Angela Marguerite Bowes-Lyon was the wife of King George VI and the mother of Queen Elizabeth II and Princess Margaret, Countess of Snowdon. She was Queen consort of the United Kingdom and the Dominions from her husband's accession in 1936 until his death in 1952, after which she was known as Queen Elizabeth The Queen Mother, to avoid confusion with her daughter. She was the last Empress consort of India.

Thereafter follow those honoured with different grades of the order, divided into five levels: the highest two conferring accolades of knighthood and all having post-nominal letters and, lastly, the holders of the Royal Victorian Medal in either gold, silver or bronze. [2] Foreigners may be admitted as honorary members, there are no limits to the number of any grade, and promotion is possible. The styles of knighthood are not used by princes, princesses, or peers in the uppermost ranks of the society, save for when their names are written in their fullest forms for the most official occasions. Retiring Deans of the Royal Peculiars of St George's Chapel at Windsor Castle and Westminster Abbey are customarily inducted as Knights Commander; clergymen appointed to the higher levels of the Royal Victorian Order do not use the associated styles, however, and honorary members are not permitted to hold them at all.

Prior to 1984, the grades of Lieutenant and Member were classified as Members (fourth class) and Members (fifth class), respectively, but both with the post-nominals MVO. On 31 December of that year, Queen Elizabeth II declared that those in the grade of Member (fourth class) would henceforth be Lieutenants with the post-nominals LVO. [11]

Grades of the Royal Victorian Order
Grade Knight/Dame Grand Cross Knight/Dame Commander Commander Lieutenant Member Medal
(associated)
PrefixSir/DameSir/Dame
Post-nominal lettersGCVOKCVO/DCVOCVOLVOMVORVM
Insignia Stervan de Koninklijke Orde van Victoria.jpg SteR KCVO.jpg RVO-Star (CVO-LVO).jpg RVO-Star (CVO-LVO).jpg RVO-Star (MVO).jpg RVM-trimmed.jpg

List of officers

The current officers of the Royal Victorian Order are as follows: [12]

Insignia and vestments

Mantle of the order bearing the star of a Knight Grand Cross GCVO mantle.jpg
Mantle of the order bearing the star of a Knight Grand Cross

Upon admission into the Royal Victorian Order, members are given various insignia of the organisation, each grade being represented by different emblems and robes. Common for all members is the badge, which is a Maltese cross with a central medallion depicting on a red background the Royal Cypher of Queen Victoria surrounded by a blue ring bearing the motto of the order—VICTORIA—and surmounted by a Tudor crown. [11] However, there are variations on the badge for each grade of the order: Knights and Dames Grand Cross wear the badge on a sash passing from the right shoulder to the left hip; Knight Commanders wear the badge on a ribbon at the neck; male Commanders, Lieutenants, and Members wear the badge from a ribbon on the left chest; [6] and women in all grades below Dame Grand Cross wear the badge on a bow pinned at the left shoulder. For Knights and Dames Grand Cross, Commanders, and Lieutenants, the Maltese cross is rendered in white enamel with gold edging, while that for Knights and Dames Commander and Members is in silver. [6] Further, the size of the badge varies by rank, that for the higher classes being larger, and Knights and Dames Grand Cross and Knights and Dames Commander have their crosses surrounded by a star: for the former, an eight-pointed silver star, and for the latter, an eight-pointed silver Maltese cross with silver rays between each arm.

The Countess of Wessex (right) wearing the riband of a Dame Grand Cross of the Royal Victorian Order Prins Edward, earl av Wessex & Sophie, grevinna av Wessex -3.jpg
The Countess of Wessex (right) wearing the riband of a Dame Grand Cross of the Royal Victorian Order

The medal bears the effigy and name of the reigning sovereign at the time of its awarding, as well as the phrase DEI • GRATIA • REGINA (or REX) • F.D. (by the grace of God, Queen (or King), Defender of the Faith), and on the reverse is the Royal Cypher upon an ornamental shield within a laurel wreath. Bars may be awarded to each class of medal for further services, and should recipients be awarded a higher level of medal or be appointed to a grade of the order itself, they may continue to wear their original medal along with the new insignia.

The order's ribbon is blue with red-white-red stripe edging, the only difference being that for foreigners appointed into the society, their ribbon bearing an additional central white stripe. For Knights Grand Cross, the ribbon is 82.5 millimetres (3.25 in) wide, for Dames Grand Cross 57.1 millimetres (2.25 in), for Knights and Dames Commander 44.4 millimetres (1.75 in), and for all other members 31.7 millimetres (1.25 in). [11]

At formal events, or collar days , of which there are 34 throughout the year, such as New Year's Day and royal anniversaries, [10] Knights and Dames Grand Cross wear the Royal Victorian Order's livery collar, consisting of an alternating string of octagonal gold pieces depicting a gold rose on a blue field and gold oblong frames within which are one of four inscriptions: Victoria, Britt. Reg. (Queen of the Britons), Def. Fid. ( fidei defensor , or Defender of the Faith), and Ind. Imp. (Empress of India). The chain supports a larger octagonal medallion with a blue enamel surface edged in red and charged with a saltire, over which is an effigy of Queen Victoria; members of the order suspend from this medallion their insignia as a badge apendant. [10] [11] Though after the death of a Knight or Dame Grand Cross their insignia may be retained by their family, the collar must be returned. Knights and Dames Grand Cross also wear a mantle of dark blue satin edged with red satin and lined with white satin, bearing a representation of the order's star on the left side. [11]

Chapel and associations

The Queen's Chapel of the Savoy, which acts as the chapel of the Royal Victorian Order SavoyChapel.jpg
The Queen's Chapel of the Savoy, which acts as the chapel of the Royal Victorian Order

Since 1938, the chapel of the Royal Victorian Order has been the Queen's Chapel of the Savoy, [1] in central London, England. However, the population of the order has grown to the point that the Savoy chapel can no longer accommodate the gathering of members held every four years, and St. George's Chapel at Windsor Castle is now employed for the event. [1] [10]

The Sovereign and Knights and Dames Grand Cross of the order are allotted stalls in the Savoy chapel's choir, and on the back of each stall is affixed a brass plate displaying the occupant's name, coat of arms, and date of admission into the organisation. Upon the occupant's death, the plate is retained, leaving the stalls festooned with a record of the order's Knights and Dames Grand Cross since 1938. There is insufficient space in the chapel for the display of knights' and dames' banners and other heraldic devices.

The Royal Victorian Order Association of Canada exists for all Canadians appointed to the order or who have received the Royal Victorian Medal; it is the only such organisation in the Commonwealth realms. [13] Founded by Michael Jackson, [14] the group has, since 2008, gathered biennially. [13]

Eligibility and appointment

Coat of arms of the Lord Baden-Powell, showing the ribbon of the Royal Victorian Order around the escutcheon and the order's insignia suspended at bottom Coat of Arms of Baron Baden-Powell.svg
Coat of arms of the Lord Baden-Powell, showing the ribbon of the Royal Victorian Order around the escutcheon and the order's insignia suspended at bottom
The visible part of the Royal Victorian Order circlet laid out RoyalVictorianOrderCirclet.png
The visible part of the Royal Victorian Order circlet laid out

Membership in the Royal Victorian Order is conferred by the reigning monarch without ministerial advice on those who have performed personal service for the sovereign, [10] any member of his or her family, or any of his or her Governors-General. All living citizens of any Commonwealth realm, including women since 1936, are eligible for any of the five levels of the order, save for Canadians: as admission to the top two levels of the organisation provides for an honorary prefix, Canadians are not normally appointed to these levels as long as the monarch's Canadian ministry adheres to the Nickle Resolution of 1919.

As it was deemed by the Canadian Cabinet to be an honour within the gift of the monarch, [15] the appointment of Canadians to the order resumed in 1972 and eligibility was extended to those who render services to the monarch's representatives in the country; [2] officials within the provincial spheres being included after 1984. [16] Originally, the Queen chose inductees herself, though the Governor General of Canada and the Canadian Secretary to the Queen could provide suggestions, some passed to them by the lieutenant governors. The practice of notifying the Prime Minister of Canada of nominees ended in 1982, to distance the order as far from politics as possible. [16]

It was reported in 2008 that some in the Chancellery of Honours at Rideau Hall wished to eliminate the Royal Victorian Order from the Canadian honours system and sometimes contested when a Canadian was appointed; however, no formal changes were ever planned. [2] In Canada, the order has come to be colloquially dubbed as the "Royal Visit Order", as the majority of appointments are made by the sovereign during her tours of the country. [2]

Foreign members will generally be admitted as honorary members of the Royal Victorian Order when the Queen is making a state visit to the individual's country or a head of state is paying a state visit to the United Kingdom. [10]

Persons have been removed from the order at the monarch's command. Anthony Blunt, a former Surveyor of the Queen's Pictures, was in 1979 stripped of his knighthood after it was revealed that he had been a spy for the USSR. Also, William Pottinger, a senior civil servant, in 1975 lost his membership in both the Order of the Bath and the Royal Victorian Order when he was jailed for corruptly receiving gifts from the architect John Poulson.

Precedence

As the Royal Victorian Order is open to the citizens of sixteen different countries, each with their own system of orders, decorations, and medals, the RVO's place of precedence varies from country to country. Some are as follows:

CountryPrecedingRVO gradeFollowing
Flag of Australia (converted).svg Australia
Order of precedence [* 1]
Knight/Dame of the Order of Australia (AK/AD)Knight/Dame Grand CrossCompanion of the Order of Australia (AC)
Companion of the Order of Australia (AC)Knight/Dame Commander Officer of the Order of Australia (AO)
Officer of the Order of Australia (AO)Commander Star of Gallantry (SG)
Member of the Order of Australia (AM)Lieutenant Member of the Royal Victorian Order (MVO)
Lieutenant of the Royal Victorian Order (LVO)Member Conspicuous Service Cross (CSC)
Australian Antarctic Medal (AAM)Medal Commendation for Gallantry
Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg Canada
Order of precedence [* 2]
Commander of the Order of Merit of the Police Forces (COM)Commander Officer of the Order of Military Merit (OMM)
Officer of the Order of Merit of the Police Forces (OOM)Lieutenant Member of the Order of Military Merit (MMM)
Member of the Order of Merit of the Police Forces (MOM)Member Venerable Order of Saint John (GC/K/D/C/O/M/SB/SSStJ)
Meritorious Service Medal (MSM)Medal Sacrifice Medal
Flag of New Zealand.svg New Zealand
Order of precedence
Knight/Dame Grand Cross of the Order of St Michael and St George (GCMG)Knight/Dame Grand CrossKnight/Dame Grand Cross of the Order of the British Empire (GBE)
Knight/Dame Commander of the Order of St Michael and St George (KCMG/DCMG)Knight/Dame CommanderKnight/Dame Commander of the Order of the British Empire (KBE/DBE)
Companion of the Order of St Michael and St George (CMG)CommanderCommander of the Order of the British Empire (CBE)
Companion of the Distinguished Service Order (DSO)LieutenantCompanion of the Queen's Service Order (QSO)
Companion of the Imperial Service Order (ISO)Member Member of the New Zealand Order of Merit (MNZM)
New Zealand Bravery Medal (NZBM)Medal Queen's Service Medal (QSM)
Flag of the United Kingdom.svg United Kingdom Flag of England.svg England and
Flag of Wales (1959-present).svg Wales

Order of precedence
Knight/Dame Grand Commander of the Order of the Indian Empire (GCIE)Knight/Dame Grand Cross Knight/Dame Grand Cross of the Order of the British Empire (GBE)
Knight/Dame Commander of the Order of the Indian Empire (KCIE/DCIE)Knight/Dame Commander Knight/Dame Commander of the Order of the British Empire (KBE/DBE)
Companion of the Order of the Indian Empire (CIE)Commander Commander of the Order of the British Empire (CBE)
Companion of the Distinguished Service Order (DSO)Lieutenant Officer of the Order of the British Empire (OBE)
Eldest son of Knight Bachelor Member Member of the Order of the British Empire (MBE)
Flag of Scotland.svg Scotland
Order of precedence
Knight/Dame Grand Commander of the Order of the Indian Empire (GCIE)Knight/Dame Grand Cross Knight/Dame Grand Cross of the Order of the British Empire (GBE)
Knight/Dame Commander of the Order of the Indian Empire (KCIE/DCIE)Knight/Dame Commander Knight/Dame Commander of the Order of the British Empire (KBE/DBE)
Sheriffs Commander Companion of the Order of the Bath (CB)
Commander of the Order of the British Empire (CBE)Lieutenant Companion of the Distinguished Service Order (DSO)
Eldest son of Knight Commander of the Order of the British Empire Member Member of the Order of the British Empire (MBE)
Northern Ireland
Order of precedence
Knight/Dame Grand Commander of the Order of the Indian Empire (GCIE)Knight/Dame Grand Cross Knight/Dame Grand Cross of the Order of the British Empire (GBE)
Knight/Dame Commander of the Order of the Indian Empire (KCIE/DCIE)Knight/Dame Commander Knight/Dame Commander of the Order of the British Empire (KBE/DBE)
Companion of the Order of the Indian Empire (CIE)Commander Commander of the Order of the British Empire (CBE)
Companion of the Distinguished Service Order (DSO)Lieutenant Officer of the Order of the British Empire (OBE)
Eldest son of Knight Commander of the Order of the British Empire Member Member of the Order of the British Empire (MBE)
  1. The order is different for honours received prior to 6 October 1992.
  2. The order is different for honours received prior to 1 June 1972.

In the United Kingdom, the wives of male members of all classes also feature on the order of precedence, as do sons, daughters and daughters-in-law of Knights Grand Cross and Knights Commanders; relatives of Dames, however, are not assigned any special precedence. As a general rule, individuals can derive precedence from their fathers or husbands, but not from their mothers or wives.

Current Knights and Dames Grand Cross

A detailed view of a stumpwork and goldwork embroidered star of a Knight or Dame Grand Cross of the Royal Victorian Order GCVO star.jpg
A detailed view of a stumpwork and goldwork embroidered star of a Knight or Dame Grand Cross of the Royal Victorian Order
Star and riband of a Knight Grand Cross of the Royal Victorian Order GCVO star and riband.jpg
Star and riband of a Knight Grand Cross of the Royal Victorian Order
Knights and Dames Grand Cross
NamePost-NominalsKnown forYear
Appointed
Royal Standard of Prince Edward, Duke of Kent.svg The Duke of Kent KG GCMG GCVO ADC(P) Royal Family1960
Royal Standard of Princess Alexandra, The Honourable Lady Ogilvy.svg Princess Alexandra KG GCVO CD Royal Family1960
Royal Standard of Prince Richard, Duke of Gloucester.svg The Duke of Gloucester KG GCVO SSI Royal Family1974
Royal Standard of Prince Edward, Duke of Kent.svg The Duchess of Kent GCVO Royal Family1977
Flag of the United Kingdom.svg The Dowager Duchess of Grafton GCVO Mistress of the Robes to Queen Elizabeth II1980
Flag of the United Kingdom.svg The Earl of Airlie KT GCVO PC JP Lord Chamberlain1984
Flag of Belize.svg Dame Elmira Minita Gordon GCMG GCVO Governor General of Belize1985
Royal Standard of members of the British Royal Family.svg The Duchess of Gloucester GCVO Royal Family1989
Flag of Australia (converted).svg Sir William Heseltine GCB GCVO AC QSO PC Principal Private Secretary to the Queen1990
Flag of the United Kingdom.svg Sir Antony Acland KG GCMG GCVO British Diplomat1991
Flag of the United Kingdom.svg Sir Christopher Mallaby GCMG GCVO British Diplomat1992
Flag of the United Kingdom.svg Sir Brian Fall GCVO KCMG British Diplomat1994
Flag of the United Kingdom.svg Sir Matthew Farrer GCVO Private solicitor to the Queen1994
Flag of New Zealand.svg Dame Catherine Tizard ONZ GCMG GCVO DBE QSO Governor-General of New Zealand1995
Flag of the United Kingdom.svg The Lord Fellowes GCB GCVO QSO PC Principal Private Secretary to the Queen1996
Flag of the United Kingdom.svg Sir Shane Blewitt GCVO Keeper of the Privy Purse1996
Flag of the United Kingdom.svg The Lord Camoys GCVO PC DL Lord Chamberlain1998
Flag of the United Kingdom.svg Major General Sir Simon Cooper GCVO Master of the Household2000 [17]
Flag of the United Kingdom.svg The Lord Luce KG GCVO PC DL Lord Chamberlain2000
Flag of the United Kingdom.svg Vice Admiral The Lord Sterling of Plaistow GCVO CBE Chairman of the Golden Jubilee Weekend Trust2002
Flag of the United Kingdom.svg The Earl of Crawford and Balcarres KT GCVO PC Lord Chamberlain to Queen Elizabeth The Queen Mother2002
Royal Standard of Prince Michael of Kent.svg Prince Michael of Kent GCVO CD Royal Family2003
Flag of the United Kingdom.svg Sir John Holmes GCVO KBE CMG British Diplomat2004
Flag of the United Kingdom.svg Sir Peter Torry GCVO KCMG British Diplomat2004
Flag of the United Kingdom.svg Lieutenant Colonel Sir Malcolm Ross GCVO OBE Extra Equerry to the Queen2005
Flag of the United Kingdom.svg The Earl Peel GCVO PC DL Lord Chamberlain2006
Flag of the United Kingdom.svg The Lord Janvrin GCB GCVO QSO PC Principal Private Secretary to the Queen2007 [18]
Flag of New Zealand.svg Sir Donald McKinnon ONZ GCVO Secretary-General of the Commonwealth of Nations2009 [19]
Royal Standard of members of the British Royal Family.svg The Countess of Wessex GCVO Royal Family2010 [20]
Flag of the United Kingdom.svg Sir Hugh Roberts GCVO CBE Surveyor of the Queen's Works of Art2010 [21]
Royal Standard of Prince Andrew, Duke of York.svg The Duke of York KG GCVO CD ADC(P) Royal Family2011 [22]
Royal Standard of Prince Edward, Earl of Wessex.svg The Earl of Wessex KG GCVO ADC(P) Royal Family2011 [23]
Flag of the United Kingdom.svg Sir Michael Peat GCVO Principal Private Secretary to the Prince of Wales2011 [24]
Royal Standard of members of the British Royal Family.svg The Duchess of Cornwall GCVO PC Royal Family2012 [25]
Flag of the United Kingdom.svg Sir Alan Reid GCVO Keeper of the Privy Purse2012
Flag of the United Kingdom.svg The Lady Hussey of North Bradley GCVO Lady-in-Waiting to the Queen2013
Flag of the United Kingdom.svg Dame Mary Morrison GCVO Woman of the Bedchamber2013
Flag of the United Kingdom.svg The Lord Ricketts GCMG GCVO British Diplomat2014
Flag of the United Kingdom.svg The Lord Geidt GCB GCVO OBE QSO PC Principal Private Secretary to the Queen2017
Royal Standard of Prince Philip, Duke of Edinburgh.svg The Duke of Edinburgh KG KT OM GCVO ONZ GBE AK QSO GCL CC CMM PC PC (Can) ADC(P) CD Consort of Queen Elizabeth II 2017 [26]
Flag of the United Kingdom.svg Sir Stephen Lamport GCVO Receiver-General of Westminster Abbey (retired)2018
Flag of the United Kingdom.svg Lieutenant Colonel Sir Andrew Ford GCVO Comptroller, Lord Chamberlain's Office2018
Flag of the United Kingdom.svg The Lord Vestey GCVO GCStJ DL Master of the Horse2018
Royal Standard of members of the British Royal Family.svg The Duchess of Cambridge GCVO Royal Family2019 [27]
Flag of the United Kingdom.svg Field Marshal The Lord Guthrie of Craigiebank GCB GCVO OBE DL Former Chief of the Defence Staff2019 [28]
Flag of the United Kingdom.svg The Lord Chartres GCVO ChStJ PC FSA Dean of the Chapels Royal2019 [29]
Honorary Knights and Dames Grand Cross
NamePost-NominalsKnown forYear
Appointed
Flag of Japan.svg Crown Prince Akihito (later Emperor Akihito) KG GCVO Former Emperor of Japan1953
Flag of Norway.svg Prince Harald (later King Harald V) KG GCVO King of Norway1955 [30]
Flag of the Netherlands.svg Princess Beatrix (later Queen Beatrix) LG GCVO Former Queen of the Netherlands1958
Flag of Ethiopia (1897-1936; 1941-1974).svg Mengesha Seyoum GCVO Prince of Ethiopia1965
Flag of Belgium (civil).svg Albert, Prince of Liège (later King Albert II) GCVO Former King of the Belgians1966 [31]
Flag of Luxembourg.svg Hereditary Grand Duke Henri (later Grand Duke Henri) GCVO Grand Duke of Luxembourg1976
Flag of Oman.svg Qaboos bin Said Al Said GCB GCMG GCVO Sultan of Oman1979 [32]
Flag of Morocco.svg Crown Prince Mohammed (later King Mohammed VI) GCVO King of Morocco1980
Flag of Morocco.svg Princess Lalla Meryem of Morocco GCVO Princess of Morocco1980
Flag of Jordan.svg Prince Muhammad bin Talal GCVO Prince of Jordan1984
Flag of Malawi.svg Cecilia Kadzamira GCVO Former Official Hostess of Malawi1985
Flag of Morocco.svg Princess Lalla Asma of Morocco GCVO Princess of Morocco1987
Flag of Morocco.svg Prince Moulay Rachid of Morocco GCVO Prince of Morocco1987
Flag of Spain.svg Prince Felipe (later King Felipe VI) KG GCVO King of Spain1988 [33]
Flag of Kuwait.svg Khaled Al-Duwaisan GCVO Kuwaiti Diplomat1995 [34]
Flag of Thailand.svg Crown Prince Vajiralongkorn (later King Rama X) GCVO King of Thailand1996
Flag of Thailand.svg Princess Sirindhorn GCVO Princess of Thailand1996
Flag of Thailand.svg Princess Chulabhorn GCVO Princess of Thailand1996
Flag of Brunei.svg Crown Prince Al-Muhtadee Billah GCVO Crown Prince of Brunei1998
Flag of Nigeria.svg Emeka Anyaoku GCVO Secretary-General of the Commonwealth of Nations2000
Flag of India.svg Kamalesh Sharma GCVO Secretary-General of the Commonwealth of Nations2016
Honorary Knights and Dames Commander
NamePost-NominalsKnown forYear
Appointed
Flag of Ethiopia (1897-1936; 1941-1974).svg Princess Seble Desta DCVO Princess of Ethiopia1965
Flag of Jordan.svg Prince Abdullah (later King Abdullah II) GCB GCMG KCVO King of Jordan1984
Flag of Indonesia.svg Teuku Mohammad Hamzah Thayeb KCVO Indonesian diplomat2012
Flag of South Korea.svg Lim Sung-nam KCVO South Korean diplomat2013
Flag of France.svg Bernard Émié KCVO French diplomat2014
Flag of Singapore.svg Foo Chi Hsia DCVO Singaporean diplomat2014
Flag of Mexico.svg Diego Gómez Pickering KCVO Mexican diplomat2015

See also

Notes

  1. For use in Canada, in accordance with the country's policy of official bilingualism.
  2. 20 June 1837 was Victoria's Accession Day.

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References

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Further reading