David Hurley

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David Hurley

AC , DSC , FTSE
David Hurley official photo.jpg
27th Governor-General of Australia
Assumed office
1 July 2019
Monarch Elizabeth II
Prime Minister Scott Morrison
Preceded by Sir Peter Cosgrove
38th Governor of New South Wales
In office
2 October 2014 1 May 2019
Monarch Elizabeth II
Premier Mike Baird
Gladys Berejiklian
Lieutenant Tom Bathurst
Preceded by Dame Marie Bashir
Succeeded by Margaret Beazley
Personal details
Born (1953-08-26) 26 August 1953 (age 66)
Wollongong, New South Wales
NationalityAustralian
Spouse(s)
Linda McMartin(m. 1977)
Children3
Military service
AllegianceAustralia
Branch/service Australian Army
Years of service1972–2014
Rank General
Commands Chief of the Defence Force (2011–2014)
Vice Chief of the Defence Force (2008–2011)
Chief of Joint Operations (2007–2008)
Chief of Capability Development Group (2003–2007)
Land Commander Australia (2002–2003)
1st Brigade (1999–2000)
1st Battalion, Royal Australian Regiment (1991–1993)
Battles/wars Operation Solace
Awards Companion of the Order of Australia
Distinguished Service Cross
Knight of the Order of Saint John

General David John Hurley, AC , DSC , FTSE (born 26 August 1953) is a former senior officer in the Australian Army and the 27th Governor-General of Australia, in office since 1 July 2019. He was previously the 38th Governor of New South Wales, serving from 2014 to 2019.

General is the second-highest rank, and the highest active rank, of the Australian Army and was created as a direct equivalent of the British military rank of general; it is also considered a four-star rank.

The Distinguished Service Cross (DSC) is a military decoration awarded to personnel of the Australian Defence Force. It is awarded for distinguished command and leadership in action. The DSC was introduced in 1991 and is the highest distinguished service decoration in the Australian Honours System. Recipients of the Distinguished Service Cross are entitled to use the post-nominal letters "DSC". Since its inception 97 awards have been made—which includes seven Bars—with the most recent being announced in the 2017 Australia Day Honours.

Australian Army land warfare branch of Australias defence forces

The Australian Army is Australia's military land force. Formed in 1901 through the amalgamation of the Australian colonial forces following federation, it is part of the Australian Defence Force (ADF) along with the Royal Australian Navy and the Royal Australian Air Force. While the Chief of the Defence Force (CDF) commands the ADF, the Army is commanded by the Chief of Army (CA). The CA is therefore subordinate to the CDF, but is also directly responsible to the Minister for Defence. Although Australian soldiers have been involved in a number of minor and major conflicts throughout Australia's history, only in Second World War has Australian territory come under direct attack.

Contents

In a 42-year military career, Hurley deployed on Operation Solace in Somalia in 1993, commanded the 1st Brigade (1999–2000), was the inaugural Chief of Capability Development Group (2003–2007) and Chief of Joint Operations (2007–2008), and served as Vice Chief of the Defence Force (2008–2011). His career culminated with his appointment as Chief of the Defence Force on 4 July 2011, in succession to Air Chief Marshal Angus Houston. [1] Hurley retired from the army in June 2014, and succeeded Dame Marie Bashir as Governor of New South Wales on 2 October 2014.

Operation Solace

Operation Solace was the Australian Defence Force's main contribution to the Unified Task Force (UNITAF) which was a United States led, United Nations sanctioned, multinational force which operated in the Republic of Somalia from 9 December 1992 to 4 May 1993. Codenamed Operation Restore Hope, UNITAF was charged with carrying out United Nations Security Council Resolution 794: to create a protected environment for conducting humanitarian operations in the southern half of the Republic of Somalia.

Somalia Federal republic in Africa

Somalia, officially the Federal Republic of Somalia, is a country located in the Horn of Africa. It is bordered by Ethiopia to the west, Djibouti to the northwest, the Gulf of Aden to the north, the Guardafui Channel and Somali Sea to the east, and Kenya to the southwest. Somalia has the longest coastline on Africa's mainland, and its terrain consists mainly of plateaus, plains and highlands. Climatically, hot conditions prevail year-round, with periodic monsoon winds and irregular rainfall.

1st Brigade (Australia) Formation of the Australian Army

1st Brigade is a combined arms formation of the Australian Army. Formed in 1903 as a militia formation based in New South Wales, it was reconstituted as part of the Australian Imperial Force in 1914 for service during World War I, the brigade fought at Gallipoli and on the Western Front before being disbanded in mid-1919. In 1921, the 1st Brigade was re-raised as a unit of Australia's part-time military forces, based in New South Wales. During World War II the brigade undertook defensive duties before being disbanded. In 1948, it was re-raised as an integral part of the Australian Regular Army. Currently the brigade is based at Robertson Barracks in Darwin and at RAAF Base Edinburgh near Adelaide, South Australia. It is the first of the Australian Army brigades to be re-organised as a combat brigade under Plan Beersheba.

Early life and education

Hurley, with his wife Linda David and Linda Hurley portrait.jpg
Hurley, with his wife Linda

David John Hurley was born on 26 August 1953 in Wollongong, New South Wales, to Norma and James Hurley. [2] His father was an Illawarra steelworker and his mother worked in a grocery store. Hurley grew up in Port Kembla and attended Port Kembla High School, where he completed his Higher School Certificate in 1971. He subsequently graduated from the Royal Military College, Duntroon with a Bachelor of Arts and Graduate Diploma in Defence Studies. [3]

Wollongong City in New South Wales, Australia

Wollongong, informally referred to as "The Gong", is a seaside city located in the Illawarra region of New South Wales, Australia. Wollongong lies on the narrow coastal strip between the Illawarra Escarpment and the Pacific Ocean, 68 kilometres (51 miles) south of central Sydney. Wollongong had an estimated urban population of 302,739 at June 2018, making it the third-largest city in New South Wales after Sydney and Newcastle, and the tenth-largest city in Australia. The city's current Lord Mayor is Gordon Bradbery AM who was elected in 2018.

Illawarra Region in New South Wales, Australia

Illawarra is a region in the Australian state of New South Wales. It is a coastal region situated immediately south of Sydney and north of the Shoalhaven or South Coast region. It encompasses the cities of Wollongong, Shellharbour and the town of Kiama.

Port Kembla, New South Wales Suburb of Wollongong, New South Wales, Australia

Port Kembla is a suburb of Wollongong 8 km south of the CBD and part of the Illawarra region of New South Wales. The suburb comprises a seaport, industrial complex, a small harbour foreshore nature reserve, and a small commercial sector. It is situated on the tip of Red Point, first European sighting by Captain James Cook in 1770. The name "Kembla" is Aboriginal word meaning "plenty [of] wild fowl".

Hurley is married to Linda (née McMartin), and has three children. [4]

Military career

Hurley entered the Royal Military College, Duntroon, as an officer cadet in January 1972. [5] On graduating from Duntroon in December 1975, he was commissioned a lieutenant in the Royal Australian Infantry Corps. His initial posting was to the 1st Battalion, Royal Australian Regiment (1RAR). Promoted to captain, he was appointed adjutant of the Sydney University Regiment before becoming regimental adjutant of the Royal Australian Regiment. He went on exchange to the 1st Battalion, Irish Guards, a British Army unit, before serving with 5th/7th Battalion, Royal Australian Regiment. [4]

Royal Military College, Duntroon Australian Army training establishment

The Royal Military College, Duntroon, also known simply as Duntroon, is the Australian Army's officer training establishment. It was founded at Duntroon, in Canberra, Australian Capital Territory, in 1911 and is located at the foot of Mount Pleasant near Lake Burley Griffin, close to the Department of Defence headquarters at Russell Hill. It is comparable with the United Kingdom's Royal Military Academy Sandhurst and the United States Military Academy at West Point. Duntroon is adjacent to the Australian Defence Force Academy (ADFA), which is Australian Defence Force's tri-service military academy that provides military and tertiary academic education for junior officers of the Australian Army, Royal Australian Air Force and the Royal Australian Navy.

Officer cadet is a rank held by military cadets during their training to become commissioned officers. In the United Kingdom, the rank is also used by members of University Royal Naval Units, University Officer Training Corps and University Air Squadron however these are not trainee officers and most do not join the armed forces.

Officer (armed forces) member of an armed force or uniformed service who holds a position of authority

An officer is a member of an armed forces or uniformed service who holds a position of authority.

Promoted to lieutenant colonel, Hurley was posted as the Senior Career Adviser (Armour, Artillery, Engineers and Infantry) in the Office of the Military Secretary in 1990, appointed SO1 (Operations) Headquarters 2nd Division in early 1991, and in November 1991 assumed command of 1RAR, which he led during Operation Solace in Somalia in 1993. He was awarded the Distinguished Service Cross for his service during this deployment. [6] In 1994 he became SO1 (Operations), Headquarters 1st Division. [7]

Lieutenant colonel (pronounced Lef-ten-ent Kernel or Loo-ten-ent Kernel ) is a rank of commissioned officer in the armies, most marine forces and some air forces of the world, above a major and below a colonel. The rank of lieutenant colonel is often shortened to simply "colonel" in conversation and in unofficial correspondence. Sometimes, the term 'half-colonel' is used in casual conversation in the British Army. A lieutenant colonel is typically in charge of a battalion or regiment in the army.

2nd Division (Australia) Formation of the Australian Army

The 2nd Division of the Australian Army commands all the Reserve brigades in Australia. These are the 4th in Victoria, the 5th in New South Wales, the 9th in South Australia and Tasmania, the 11th in Queensland, the 13th in Western Australia, and the 8th spread across the country. The division is also responsible for the security of Australia's northern borders through its Regional Force Surveillance Units.

1st Division (Australia) Formation of the Australian Army

The 1st Division is the main formation of the Australian Army and contains the majority of the Army's regular forces. Its headquarters is in Enoggera, a suburb of Brisbane. The division was first formed in 1914 for service during World War I as a part of the Australian Imperial Force (AIF). It was initially part of the Australian and New Zealand Army Corps (ANZAC) and served with that formation during the Gallipoli campaign, before later serving on the Western Front. After the war, the division became a part-time unit based in New South Wales, and during World War II it undertook defensive duties in Australia before being disbanded in 1945.

Following promotion to colonel, Hurley was appointed Chief of Staff, Headquarters 1st Division in June 1994, attended the United States Army War College from 1996 to 1997, became Military Secretary to Chief of Army, and was posted to Australian Defence Headquarters as Director of Preparedness and Mobilisation in December 1997. [8] As a brigadier, he assumed command of the 1st Brigade in Darwin in January 1999. During this period he oversaw the brigade's transition to a higher degree of operational readiness and its support to Australian–led operations in East Timor. He went on to be Director General Land Development within Capability Systems in January 2001. [7]

Hurley was promoted to major general in 2001 and served as Head Capability Systems Division from July 2001, and as Land Commander Australia from December 2002. [7] Promoted to lieutenant general, he assumed the new appointment of Chief of Capability Development Group in December 2003, went on to take the newly separated appointment of Chief of Joint Operations in September 2007, and became Vice Chief of the Defence Force in July 2008. [9]

Hurley was promoted to general and succeeded Air Chief Marshal Angus Houston as Chief of the Defence Force (CDF) on 4 July 2011. [1] In January 2012 Hurley completed 40 years service to the Australian Defence Force, [5] and on 20 January while in Paris, he was presented with the insignia for Officer of the Legion of Honour by the French CDF. [10] In February, he was presented with a fifth clasp to the Defence Force Service Medal in recognition of his 40 years of service. [5] Hurley retired from the Australian Army on 30 June 2014, and was succeeded as CDF by Air Chief Marshal Mark Binskin. [11]

Lieutenant General David Morrison, the 2016 Australian of the Year, credited Hurley with the phrase "the standard you walk past is the standard you accept" in his anti-misogyny speech, which became "one of the most quoted phrases" of Morrison's speech. [12]

Governor of New South Wales

Hurley at his swearing-in ceremony as the 27th Governor-General of Australia David Hurley swearing-in.jpg
Hurley at his swearing-in ceremony as the 27th Governor-General of Australia

On 5 June 2014, New South Wales Premier Mike Baird announced that Hurley would replace Dame Marie Bashir as Governor of New South Wales: he was sworn in on 2 October 2014 after Bashir's term as governor had expired. [13] On 17 March 2015, he was invested as a Knight of the Order of St John (a British honour) by the Lord Prior of the Order, Neil Conn, at a ceremony at Government House, Sydney. [14]

Governor-General of Australia

On 16 December 2018, Prime Minister Scott Morrison announced that Hurley would become the next Governor-General of Australia commencing on 1 July 2019. [15] [16] [17] Margaret Beazley was designated as his replacement as Governor of New South Wales. [18] Hurley was sworn in as the 27th Governor-General at Parliament House, Canberra, on 1 July 2019. His first words were spoken in the language of the local Aboriginal people. [19]

On 11 September 2019, when attending an Indonesian national day reception held by the Indonesian Embassy at the Australian National Gallery in Canberra, Hurley opted to make his address to the reception in Indonesian. After first making his address in Indonesian, he repeated his comments in English. This is the first recorded occasion that any Australian Governor-General has made any extended statement in Indonesian on any occasion in Australia.

Other appointments

Hurley is an Honorary Patron of the ACT Veterans Rugby Club and Patron of Transport Heritage NSW. [20] [21]

Titles, styles and honours

Titles

Hurley's style and title in full from 1 July 2019 is: His Excellency General The Honourable David John Hurley, Principal Companion and Chancellor of the Order of Australia, Distinguished Service Cross, Governor-General of the Commonwealth of Australia.

Honours and awards

Order of Australia (Military) ribbon.png DSC (Australia) ribbon.png

Order of St John (UK) ribbon.png Australian Active Service Medal ribbon.png Australian Service Medal ribbon.png DFSM with Fed Star.png

Australian Defence Medal (Australia) ribbon.png Legion Honneur Officier ribbon.svg US Legion of Merit Commander ribbon.png Order of Military Service (BAT).gif

Bintang Yudha Dharma Nararya.jpg Darjah Utama Bakti Cemerlang (Tentera) ribbon.png Order of the Crown of Thailand - Medal (Thailand) ribbon.svg Decoration of Merit.jpg

Order of Australia (Military) ribbon.png Companion of the Order of Australia (AC)26 January 2010 [22]
Officer of the Order of Australia (AO)26 January 2004 [23]
DSC (Australia) ribbon.png Distinguished Service Cross (DSC)26 November 1993 [6]
Order of St John (UK) ribbon.png Knight of Justice of the Order of St John 30 July 2019 [14]
Australian Active Service Medal ribbon.png Australian Active Service Medal with SOMALIA clasp [24]
Australian Service Medal ribbon.png Australian Service Medal [24]
DFSM with Fed Star.png Defence Force Service Medal with the Federation Star40–44 years service [5]
Australian Defence Medal (Australia) ribbon.png Australian Defence Medal [24]
Legion Honneur Officier ribbon.svg Officer of the Legion of Honour (France)20 January 2012 [10] [25]
US Legion of Merit Commander ribbon.png Commander of the Legion of Merit (United States)10 May 2012 [26]
Order of Military Service (BAT).gif Knight Grand Commander of the Order of Military Service (Malaysia)2012 [27]
Bintang Yudha Dharma Nararya.jpg Defence Meritorious Service Star – 1st Class [28] (Indonesia)19 November 2012 [25] [29] [30]
Darjah Utama Bakti Cemerlang (Tentera) ribbon.png Distinguished Service Order (Singapore)13 February 2013 [25] [31]
Order of the Crown of Thailand - Medal (Thailand) ribbon.svg Gold Medal of the Order of the Crown of Thailand (Thailand)June 2014 [25]
Decoration of Merit.jpg Gold Decoration of Merit (Netherlands)June 2014 [25]
Badges

Honorary degrees

Honorary appointments

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References

  1. 1 2 Massola, James (1 June 2011). "David Hurley is made new defence force chief as part of sweeping renewal of top brass". The Australian. News Limited. Retrieved 9 June 2011.
  2. "The Governor-General's biography". Office of the Governor-General. Retrieved 1 July 2019.
  3. "General David Hurley". Lowy Institute. Retrieved 30 July 2018.
  4. 1 2 "General David Hurley, AC, DSC". Biography. Department of Defence, Australian Government. Retrieved 1 July 2019.
  5. 1 2 3 4 Army News, February 2012, www.defence.gov.au
  6. 1 2 It's an Honour – Distinguished Service Cross (Australian) – 26 November 1993
  7. 1 2 3 Defence Keynote Address to SimTecT2006 Archived 21 March 2012 at the Wayback Machine , LTGEN General David Hurley, 29 May 2006, Melbourne Convention Centre, www.siaa.asn.au
  8. List of Witnesses at Public Hearings, Parliament House Canberra, 16 April 1998, www.aph.gov.au
  9. Hackett Centenary Lectures, King's College London, 12 November 2010, www.kcl.ac.uk
  10. 1 2 "French Embassy in Australia – Officer of the Legion of Honour – 20 January 2012".
  11. "Chief of Defence Force change of command". Defence Media Release. Department of Defence. Archived from the original on 11 August 2014. Retrieved 30 June 2014.Cite uses deprecated parameter |deadurl= (help)
  12. Aubusson, Kate (2 February 2016). "David Morrison defends Australian of the Year honour on Q&A". The Age . Retrieved 2 February 2016.
  13. "General Hurley named as NSW Governor". Sky News. 5 June 2014. Archived from the original on 6 June 2014. Retrieved 5 June 2014.Cite uses deprecated parameter |deadurl= (help)
  14. 1 2 "Governor's Program – 17 March 2015". Governor of New South Wales. 17 March 2015. Retrieved 20 March 2015.
  15. "Scott Morrison picks former general David Hurley to be Australia's next governor-general". Sydney Morning Herald. 16 December 2018. Retrieved 15 December 2018.
  16. "Australia's New Governor-General". Prime Minister of Australia. 16 December 2018. Retrieved 16 December 2018.
  17. Karp, Paul; Cox, Lisa (16 December 2018). "David Hurley named next governor general of Australia as Labor blasts timing". The Guardian. Retrieved 16 December 2018.
  18. Berejiklian, Gladys (13 January 2019). "Appointment of The Honourable Justice Margaret Beazley QC AO as Governor" (Press release). Government of New South Wales . Retrieved 2 March 2019.
  19. Remeikis, Amy (1 July 2019). "General David Hurley sworn in as Australia's 27th governor general – politics live". The Guardian. Retrieved 1 July 2019.
  20. "Patronage Listing". Governor of New South Wales. Retrieved 20 June 2018.
  21. "ACT Veterans Rugby". Archived from the original on 23 June 2014.Cite uses deprecated parameter |deadurl= (help)
  22. It's an Honour – Companion of the Order of Australia – 26 January 2010
    Citation: For eminent service to the Australian Defence Force as Chief of Capability Development Group, Chief of Joint Operations and Vice Chief of the Defence Force.
  23. It's an Honour – Officer of the Order of Australia – 26 January 2004
    Citation: For distinguished service, leadership and management to the Australian Defence Force in senior command and staff appointments.
  24. 1 2 3 Official High Resolution Photo, July 2011, www.defence.gov.au
  25. 1 2 3 4 5 Raymond Griggs (24 June 2014). "David Hurley last night promoted VADM Tim Barrett who will next week succeed me as CN Australia" . Retrieved 25 June 2014.
  26. "General David Hurley AC DSC". University of Wollongong. Retrieved 2 August 2018.
  27. ABC News, General Hurley 'pleased' accusations against General Campbell were withdrawn retrieved 16 December 2018
  28. Bintang Yudha Dharma Utama is also translated as "The Grand Meritorious Military Order – 1st Class" – Chief of Defence Force receives Indonesia's highest military award, AsiaOne, 2 May 2012
  29. Defence News – Defence Meritorious Service Star – 19 November 2012
  30. The ribbon displayed is for Bintang Yudha Dharma Nararya (Defence Meritorious Service Star – 3rd Class). The ribbon for the Bintang Yudha Dharma Utama (Defence Meritorious Service Star – 1st Class) is the same, but with the addition of two central narrow red stripes. Bintang Yudha Dharma, Sekretariat Negara Republik Indonesia Official Website, www.setneg.go.id
  31. Top military award conferred on Australian Chief of the Defence Force – Top military award conferred on Australian Chief of the Defence Force, Australian High Commission, Singapore, 13 February 2013
  32. "Honorary Doctorate Recipients – General David Hurley AC DSC". University of Wollongong. Retrieved 7 March 2018.
  33. Offner, Steve (11 December 2015). "Houston, Hurley receive honorary doctorates". University of New South Wales. UNSW Newsroom. Retrieved 7 March 2018.
  34. "AUTUMN GRADUATION SEASON COMMENCES WITH HONORARY DOCTORATE AWARDED". Newsroom. Macquarie University. 18 April 2017. Retrieved 7 March 2018.
  35. "Vice-regal Program – Tuesday, 30 January 2018". Governor of New South Wales. Office of the Governor. 30 January 2018. Retrieved 7 March 2018.
  36. 1 2 "Patronage Listing". Governor of New South Wales. Office of the Governor. Retrieved 7 March 2018.
  37. "Vice-regal Program – Thursday, 2 March 2017". Governor of New South Wales. Office of the Governor. 2 March 2017. Retrieved 7 March 2018.
  38. "Understanding the Most Venerable Order of St John" (PDF). Governor of New South Wales. Governor of New South Wales. 12 December 2014. Retrieved 24 August 2018.
  39. "Understanding the Most Venerable Order of St John" (PDF). St John South Australia. St John South Australia. 12 December 2014. Retrieved 24 August 2018.
  40. "Review the Attestation Parade for Class 323". Saint John South Australia. Saint John South Australia. 2012. Retrieved 24 August 2018.
  41. "25 NEW ATSE FELLOWS INCLUDE SEVEN WOMEN". ATSE. Australian Academy of Technology and Engineering. 26 October 2016. Retrieved 7 March 2018.
Military offices
Preceded by
Major General Peter Abigail
Land Commander Australia
2002–2003
Succeeded by
Major General Ken Gillespie
New title Chief Capability Development Group
2003–2007
Succeeded by
Vice Admiral Matt Tripovich
New title
Separated from the roles of VCDF
Chief of Joint Operations
2007–2008
Succeeded by
Lieutenant General Mark Evans
Preceded by
Lieutenant General Ken Gillespie
Vice Chief of the Defence Force
2008–2011
Succeeded by
Air Marshal Mark Binskin
Preceded by
Air Chief Marshal Angus Houston
Chief of the Defence Force
2011–2014
Succeeded by
Air Chief Marshal Mark Binskin
Government offices
Preceded by
Dame Marie Bashir
Governor of New South Wales
2014–2019
Succeeded by
Margaret Beazley
Preceded by
Sir Peter Cosgrove
Governor-General of Australia
2019–present
Incumbent