Mike Baird

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Mike Baird
The Honourable Mike Baird MP.png
44th Premier of New South Wales
Elections: 2015
In office
17 April 2014 23 January 2017
Monarch Elizabeth II
Governor Marie Bashir
David Hurley
Deputy Andrew Stoner
Troy Grant
John Barilaro
Preceded by Barry O'Farrell
Succeeded by Gladys Berejiklian
20th Leader of the New South Wales Liberal Party
In office
17 April 2014 23 January 2017
DeputyGladys Berejiklian
Preceded by Barry O'Farrell
Succeeded byGladys Berejiklian
Minister for Infrastructure
In office
23 April 2014 23 January 2017
Preceded by Brad Hazzard
Succeeded by Andrew Constance
Minister for Western Sydney
In office
23 April 2014 23 January 2017
Preceded by Barry O'Farrell
Succeeded by Stuart Ayres
Treasurer of New South Wales
In office
3 April 2011 23 April 2014
Premier Barry O'Farrell
Preceded by Eric Roozendaal
Succeeded by Andrew Constance
Member of the New South Wales Parliament
for Manly
In office
24 March 2007  23 January 2017
Preceded by David Barr
Succeeded by James Griffin
Personal details
Born
Michael Bruce Baird

(1968-04-01) 1 April 1968 (age 51)
Melbourne, Victoria
Political party Liberal Party
Spouse(s)Kerryn Baird
Relations Bruce Baird (father), Julia Baird (sister)
Children3
Education The King's School, Parramatta
University of Sydney
Regent College
Occupation Chief Customer Officer of NAB
Politician
[1] [2]

Michael Bruce Baird (born 1 April 1968 [3] ) is an Australian investment banker and former politician who was the 44th Premier of New South Wales, the Minister for Infrastructure, the Minister for Western Sydney, and the Leader of the New South Wales Liberal Party from April 2014 to January 2017.

Australia Country in Oceania

Australia, officially the Commonwealth of Australia, is a sovereign country comprising the mainland of the Australian continent, the island of Tasmania and numerous smaller islands. It is the largest country in Oceania and the world's sixth-largest country by total area. The neighbouring countries are Papua New Guinea, Indonesia and East Timor to the north; the Solomon Islands and Vanuatu to the north-east; and New Zealand to the south-east. The population of 25 million is highly urbanised and heavily concentrated on the eastern seaboard. Australia's capital is Canberra, and its largest city is Sydney. The country's other major metropolitan areas are Melbourne, Brisbane, Perth and Adelaide.

Premier of New South Wales head of government for the state of New South Wales, Australia

The Premier of New South Wales is the head of government in the state of New South Wales, Australia. The Government of New South Wales follows the Westminster system, with a Parliament of New South Wales acting as the legislature. The Premier is appointed by the Governor of New South Wales, and by modern convention holds office by virtue of his or her ability to command the support of a majority of members of the lower house of Parliament, the Legislative Assembly.

Minister for Jobs, Investment, Tourism and Western Sydney

The New South Wales Minister for Jobs, Investment, Tourism and Western Sydney is a minister of the Government of New South Wales who has responsibilities for policy development and administration for the development of employment, investment, tourism and Western Sydney in the state of New South Wales, Australia.

Contents

Baird represented the electoral district of Manly in the New South Wales Legislative Assembly for the Liberal Party from 2007 to 2017. Before becoming Premier, he was the Treasurer of New South Wales in the O'Farrell government between 2011 and 2014. On 19 January 2017, Baird announced his intention to step down and on 23 January he resigned as Premier and member for Manly.

Electoral district of Manly state electoral district of New South Wales, Australia

Manly is an electoral district of the Legislative Assembly in the Australian state of New South Wales, and covers a large portion of the Northern Beaches Council local government area. Created in 1927, although it has historically tended to be a Liberal-leaning seat, Manly has had a history of independent local members. It is represented by James Griffin for the Liberal Party, and was previously represented by the former Premier of New South Wales, Mike Baird.

New South Wales Legislative Assembly one of the two chambers of the Parliament of New South Wales

The New South Wales Legislative Assembly is the lower of the two houses of the Parliament of New South Wales, an Australian state. The upper house is the New South Wales Legislative Council. Both the Assembly and Council sit at Parliament House in the state capital, Sydney. The Assembly is presided over by the Speaker of the Legislative Assembly.

The Liberal Party of Australia , commonly known as the New South Wales Liberals, is the state division of the Liberal Party of Australia in New South Wales. The party currently governs in New South Wales in coalition with the National Party of Australia (NSW). The party is part of the federal Liberal Party which governs nationally in Coalition with the National Party of Australia.

Early career

Born in Melbourne, Baird is the son of Judy and Bruce Baird. [2] His father was a New South Wales Minister and Member of Parliament representing the electoral district of Northcott, and later a Member of the Australian House of Representatives, representing the Division of Cook, for the Liberal Party.

Bruce George Baird, AM, is a former Australian politician whose career included a stint as Deputy Leader of the Liberal Party in New South Wales.

Northcott was an electoral district of the Legislative Assembly in the Australian state of New South Wales between 1968 and 1999.

Australian House of Representatives Lower house of Australia

The House of Representatives is the lower house of the bicameral Parliament of Australia, the upper house being the Senate. Its composition and powers are established in Chapter I of the Constitution of Australia.

Baird attended The King's School, Parramatta, [4] and spent time living in the United States of America while his father served as head of the Australian trade commission in New York City. [5] [6] Baird graduated with a Bachelor of Arts with majors in Economics and Government from the University of Sydney in 1989. [7] [8] Baird also studied at Regent College in Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada, initially intending to enter the Anglican ministry, but while there decided to pursue a career in investment banking and later politics. [4] In 1999, he unsuccessfully sought preselection for the seat of Manly. Baird then returned to investment banking, working for the National Australia Bank for a time in London, before returning to Sydney to work for HSBC Australia. [9]

The Kings School, Parramatta private school in Sydney, Australia

The King's School is a private, Anglican, day and boarding school for boys, located in North Parramatta in the western suburbs of Sydney. Founded in 1831, it claims to be Australia's oldest independent school. The School is situated on a 148-hectare (365-acre) campus.

New York City Largest city in the United States

The City of New York, usually called either New York City (NYC) or simply New York (NY), is the most populous city in the United States. With an estimated 2018 population of 8,398,748 distributed over a land area of about 302.6 square miles (784 km2), New York is also the most densely populated major city in the United States. Located at the southern tip of the state of New York, the city is the center of the New York metropolitan area, the largest metropolitan area in the world by urban landmass and one of the world's most populous megacities, with an estimated 19,979,477 people in its 2018 Metropolitan Statistical Area and 22,679,948 residents in its Combined Statistical Area. A global power city, New York City has been described as the cultural, financial, and media capital of the world, and exerts a significant impact upon commerce, entertainment, research, technology, education, politics, tourism, art, fashion, and sports. The city's fast pace has inspired the term New York minute. Home to the headquarters of the United Nations, New York is an important center for international diplomacy.

A Bachelor of Arts is a bachelor's degree awarded for an undergraduate course or program in either the liberal arts, sciences, or both. Bachelor of Arts programs generally take three to four years depending on the country, institution, and specific specializations, majors, or minors. The word baccalaureus should not be confused with baccalaureatus, which refers to the one- to two-year postgraduate Bachelor of Arts with Honors degree in some countries.

Political career

Baird again sought, this time successfully, Liberal Party preselection for the seat of Manly and went on to defeat the sitting independent member David Barr by 3.4% at the 2007 state election. [10] After initially serving in a range of junior shadow ministries, Baird was promoted to the position of Shadow Treasurer in 2008 and touted as a future Liberal leader. [9] [11] Following the election of the O'Farrell government in 2011, Baird was appointed Treasurer, although O'Farrell removed some of Baird's ministerial responsibilities, transferring the authority for land tax, gaming tax, payroll tax, public service superannuation and the Office of State Revenue to Greg Pearce, the Minister for Finance and Services. [12]

David Barr is an Australian politician. He was the Independent Member for Manly of the New South Wales Legislative Assembly from 1999 to 2007. He succeeded Independent Peter Macdonald and served two terms before his defeat by Liberal candidate Mike Baird.

Gregory Stephen Pearce, an Australian politician, is a former member of the Legislative Council of New South Wales, representing the Liberal Party from 1 November 2000 to 15 November 2017. He also served as Minister for Finance and Services and Minister for the Illawarra in the O'Farrell ministry from 2011 to 2013.

Baird has campaigned against dangerous drinking, voted against embryonic stem research and euthanasia, does not support same-sex marriage or same-sex adoption [13] [5] and has stated that his strongest preference is not to support abortion in most circumstances. [14] He is strongly in favour of Australia becoming a republic. [15]

Republicanism in Australia is a movement to change Australia's system of government from a constitutional monarchy to a republic. Republicanism was first espoused in Australia before Federation in 1901. After a period of decline after Federation, the movement again became prominent at the end of the 20th century after successive legal and socio-cultural changes loosened Australia's ties with the United Kingdom.

In 2015, Baird supported calls for increasing the GST to 15% [16] [17]

Premier of New South Wales

Baird at the official reopening of the Lindt Cafe, Martin Place, Sydney, March 2015. (1)Lindt Cafe Reopening 035.jpg
Baird at the official reopening of the Lindt Café, Martin Place, Sydney, March 2015.

Following Barry O'Farrell's resignation, [18] Baird was elected unopposed as parliamentary leader of the NSW division of the Liberal Party on 17 April 2014, and subsequently sworn in as the 44th Premier of New South Wales on 23 April by the Governor of New South Wales, Dame Marie Bashir. [19]

Baird immediately reshuffled the ministry elevating Andrew Constance into the Treasury portfolio and increasing Andrew Stoner's ministries to five [20] in preparation for the 2015 state election. [21] [20] In October, Stoner resigned as Leader of the NSW Nationals and Deputy Premier of New South Wales and was replaced by Troy Grant.

The Sydney Morning Herald described Baird's government as "the most devout in living memory," with a concentration of powerful religious figures in its upper echelons. [13] Baird's chief of staff, Bay Warburton, once said that in his role as chief of staff he is serving Jesus, "and Mike (Baird), who's the Treasurer—he believes he's serving Jesus as the Treasurer of the state. He believes that he has a great opportunity to help people by making responsible decisions about the money from this state." [13]

On the morning of 15 December 2014, a lone gunman, Man Haron Monis, held hostage ten customers and eight employees of a Lindt chocolate café located at Martin Place, Sydney. Baird addressed the media during the stand-off, and stated "we are being tested today... in Sydney. The police are being tested, the public is being tested, but whatever the test we will face it head on and we will remain a strong democratic, civil society. I have full confidence in the Police Commissioner and the incredible work of the NSW police force. [22] On 20 March 2015, Baird met with staff at the re-opened café, stating the staff and company: "...Are saying that they want to be strong for their friends, they want to be strong for this city and state". [23]

2015 New South Wales election

At the 2015 election, Baird led the Liberal-National Coalition to a second term. The main policy that dominated the election was Baird's unpopular policy to lease 49% of the state's electricity distribution network, known as the "poles and wires" in the form of a 99-year lease to the private sector and use the proceeds to invest in new road, public transport, water, health and education infrastructure. [24] [25]

Other regional policies centred around the Baird Government's truncation of the Central Coast & Newcastle Railway Line at Wickham and its replacement with the $130 million light rail system and associated transport interchange as part of a broader revitilisation of the Newcastle city centre. [26] Coal Seam Gas was a likewise major regional issue in northern New South Wales. [27]

Ultimately, Baird won a full term, though he lost 15 seats from the massive majority he'd inherited from O'Farrell. Baird is only the fourth state Liberal leader, after Sir Robert Askin, Nick Greiner and O'Farrell, to win an election in New South Wales since the main non-Labor party adopted the Liberal banner in 1945. It also marked the first time since 1973 that a non-Labor government had retained its majority at an election.

Approval rating

Since replacing Barry O'Farrell as Premier in April 2014, Baird initially fared well in statewide opinion polls but his approval rating collapsed in the 2nd half of 2016. From December 2015 to September 2016, Baird's satisfaction rating fell by 46 points—"the biggest fall in net satisfaction of any mainland state premier in the history of Newspoll". [28]

Newspoll
Satisfaction Rating of Mike Baird
[29]
SatisfiedDissatisfied
September 201639%46%
September 201563%23%
March 201557%29%
February 201559%26%
December 201460%22%
October 201456%20%
August 201449%23%
June 201449%19%

Lockout laws

Baird had publicly advocated for the tough Sydney lockout laws [30] and on 9 February 2016 posted a Facebook response to an article published by Matt Barrie condemning the Premier's actions. [31] Baird's response gained international attention [32] after the post received over 10,000 likes - along with more than 10,000 comments that were mostly critical of the Premier's stance on the laws. [33] Baird's reputation as a "darling of social media" [34] was tarnished as the hashtag #casinomike became the number one trending topic nationwide on Twitter in reference to lockout laws not applying to Star City Casino, as it is located outside the entertainment and cbd precincts where the laws apply. [35] A protest was organised in response to Baird's comments by community group Keep Sydney Open on 21 February 2016, [36] with over 15,000 people marching in Sydney's CBD and calling on the Baird government to abolish the lockout laws. [37]

Resignation

On 19 January 2017, Baird announced he was retiring from politics, with his resignation to be effective after a leadership spill the following week. [38] He said, "I have made clear from the beginning that I was in politics to make a difference, and then move on. After 10 years in public life, this moment for me has arrived." [39] [40] Following his decision to resign, Baird was criticised for his failure to listen on key issues such as protests against the WestConnex, lockout laws and local government amalgamations. Baird also reversed an earlier decision to ban greyhound racing in the face of significant community pressure, especially from the Nationals. [41]

On 23 January 2017, Baird formally resigned as both premier and member for Manly, and Gladys Berejiklian was sworn in as New South Wales' 45th premier. [42]

In February 2017, Baird took up a position with the National Australia Bank. [43]

Personal life

Baird lives in Fairlight in northern Sydney [44] and is married to wife Kerryn. Together they have three children; Laura, Cate and Luke. [45] His sister is journalist Julia Baird, presenter of ABC's The Drum TV program. His younger brother, Steve Baird, is an executive at Velocity Frequent Flyer.

Baird is a long time friend of former Australian prime minister Tony Abbott and they regularly surf together off the Northern Beaches.

See also

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References

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New South Wales Legislative Assembly
Preceded by
David Barr
Member for Manly
2007–2017
Succeeded by
James Griffin
Political offices
Preceded by
Eric Roozendaal
Treasurer of New South Wales
2011–2014
Succeeded by
Andrew Constance
Preceded by
Barry O'Farrell
Premier of New South Wales
2014–2017
Succeeded by
Gladys Berejiklian
Minister for Western Sydney
2014–2017
Succeeded by
Stuart Ayres
Preceded by
Brad Hazzard
as Minister for Planning and Infrastructure
Minister for Infrastructure
2014–2017
Succeeded by
Andrew Constance
Party political offices
Preceded by
Barry O'Farrell
Leader of the New South Wales Liberal Party
2014–2017
Succeeded by
Gladys Berejiklian