Government of New South Wales

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Government of New South Wales
State Government
Coat of Arms of New South Wales.svg New South Wales Government logo.svg
Formation
Founding document Constitution of New South Wales
StateFlag of New South Wales.svg  New South Wales
CountryFlag of Australia (converted).svg  Australia
Website nsw.gov.au
Legislative branch
Legislature Parliament of New South Wales
Meeting place Parliament House
Executive branch
Head of state Governor [1]
Main body New South Wales Ministry
Head of government Premier
Appointer Governor on behalf of the Queen of Australia in right of the State of New South Wales.
Headquarters Chief Secretary's building
Main organ Executive Council of New South Wales
Departments9 departments
Judicial branch
Court Supreme Court
Seat Law Courts Building

The Government of New South Wales, also known as the NSW Government, is the Australian state democratic administrative authority of New South Wales. It is currently held by a coalition of the Liberal Party and the National Party. The Government of New South Wales, a parliamentary constitutional monarchy, was formed in 1856 as prescribed in its Constitution, as amended from time to time. Since the Federation of Australia in 1901, New South Wales has been a state of the Commonwealth of Australia, and the Constitution of Australia regulates its relationship with the Commonwealth. Under the Australian Constitution, New South Wales, as with all states, ceded legislative and judicial supremacy to the Commonwealth, but retained powers in all matters not in conflict with the Commonwealth.

Contents

Executive and judicial powers

New South Wales is governed according to the principles of the Westminster system, a form of parliamentary government based on the model of the United Kingdom. Legislative power rests with the Parliament of New South Wales, which consists of the Crown, represented by the Governor of New South Wales, and the two Houses, the New South Wales Legislative Council (the upper house) and the New South Wales Legislative Assembly (the lower house). Executive power rests formally with the Executive Council, which consists of the Governor and senior ministers. [2]

The Governor, as representative of the Crown, is the formal repository of power, which is exercised by him or her on the advice of the Premier of New South Wales and the Cabinet. The Premier and Ministers are appointed by the Governor, and hold office by virtue of their ability to command the support of a majority of members of the Legislative Assembly. Judicial power is exercised by the Supreme Court of New South Wales and a system of subordinate courts, but the High Court of Australia and other federal courts have overriding jurisdiction on matters which fall under the ambit of the Australian Constitution.

In 2006, the Sesquicentenary of Responsible Government in New South Wales, the Constitution Amendment Pledge of Loyalty Act 2006 No. 6 was enacted to amend the Constitution Act 1902 to require Members of the New South Wales Parliament and its Ministers to take a pledge of loyalty to Australia and to the people of New South Wales instead of swearing allegiance to the Queen her heirs and successors, and to revise the oaths taken by Executive Councillors. [3] The Act was assented to by the Queen on 3 April 2006.

Ministries

The following individuals serve as government ministers, at the pleasure of the Queen, represented by the Governor of New South Wales. The government ministers are listed in order of seniority as listed on the Parliament of New South Wales website and were sworn on by the Governor with effect from 2 April 2019, [4] [5] while their opposition counterparts are listed to correspond with the government ministers. [6] All Opposition counterparts are members of the Parliament of New South Wales.

MinisterOfficePortraitPartyOpposition
counterpart
OfficePortraitParty
Gladys Berejiklian Premier Gladys Berejiklian NSW (cropped).jpg   Liberal Chris Minns Leader of the Opposition Chris Minns MP.png   Labor
John Barilaro Deputy Premier John Barilaro 2016.jpg   National Prue Car Deputy Leader of the Opposition Prue car.jpg   Labor
Minister for Regional New South Wales, Industry and Trade Mick Veitch MLC Shadow Minister for Regional New South Wales Mich Veitch MLC.jpg   Labor
Anoulack Chanthivong Shadow Minister for Industry and Trade  Labor
Dominic Perrottet Treasurer Dominic Perrottet 7 September 2016 outside Sydney Hospital.jpg   Liberal Daniel Mookhey MLCShadow Treasurer
Shadow Minister for the Gig Economy
  Labor
Paul Toole Minister for Regional Transport and Roads   National Jenny Aitchison Shadow Minister for Regional Transport and Roads Jenny Aitchison.jpg   Labor
Don Harwin MLC Minister for the Public Service and Employee Relations, Aboriginal Affairs, and the Arts   Liberal Sophie Cotsis Shadow Minister for Industrial Relations
Shadow Minister for Work Health and Safety
  Labor
Walt Secord MLCShadow Minister for Arts and Heritage
Shadow Minister for the North Coast
  Labor
David Harris Shadow Minister for Aboriginal Affairs and Treaty
Shadow Minister for the Central Coast
  Labor
Vice-President of the Executive Council
Leader of Government Business in the Legislative Council
Penny Sharpe MLCLeader of the Opposition in the Legislative Council Penny Sharpe MLC, Nov 2012.jpg   Labor
Special Minister of State John Graham MLCShadow Special Minister of State
Shadow Minister for the Night-Time Economy
Shadow Minister for Music
John Graham MLC.jpg   Labor
Andrew Constance Minister for Transport and Roads Minister introduces Sydney's first metro train (37069473950) (cropped).png   Liberal Shadow Minister for Roads
Jo Haylen Shadow Minister for Transport Jo Haylen MP 2015.jpg   Labor
Leader of the House Ron Hoenig Manager of Opposition Business  Labor
Brad Hazzard Minister for Health and Medical Research Bradley Hazzard, Lismore, December 2012 (crop).jpg   Liberal Ryan Park Shadow Minister for Health
Shadow Minister for the Illawara and South Coast
  Labor
Tara Moriarty MLCShadow Minister for Medical Research  Labor
Rob Stokes Minister for Planning and Public Spaces MP Rob Stokes 2014 (cropped).jpg   Liberal Paul Scully Shadow Minister for Planning and Public Spaces  Labor
Mark Speakman SC Attorney General 150225 MDCC Election Forum Mark Speakman.jpg   Liberal Michael Daley Shadow Attorney-General  Labor
Minister for Prevention of Domestic and Sexual Violence Jodie Harrison Shadow Minister for Prevention of Domestic Violence and Sexual Assault Jodie Harrison MP.png   Labor
Victor Dominello Minister for Customer Service and Digital Dominello with coalition leadership (cropped).JPG   Liberal Yasmin Catley Shadow Minister for Customer Service and Digital
Shadow Minister for the Hunter
  Labor
Sarah Mitchell MLC Minister for Education and Early Childhood Learning Minister Mitchell July 20 headshot DSC6710a.jpg   National Prue CarShadow Minister for Education and Early Childhood Learning Prue car.jpg   Labor
Deputy Leader of the Government in the Legislative CouncilJohn Graham MLCDeputy Leader of the Opposition in the Legislative Council John Graham MLC.jpg   Labor
David Elliott Minister for Police and Emergency Services   Liberal Walt Secord MLCShadow Minister for Police  Labor
Jihad Dib Shadow Minister for Emergency Services Jihad Dib MP.png   Labor
Melinda Pavey Minister for Water, Property and Housing Melinda Pavey.jpg   National Rose Jackson MLCShadow Minister for Water
Shadow Minister for Housing and Homelessness
Rose Proflie Pic.jpg   Labor
Steve Kamper Shadow Minister for Property  Labor
Stuart Ayres Minister for Jobs, Investment, Tourism and Western Sydney Stuart Ayres 2015.jpg   Liberal David HarrisShadow Minister for Jobs, Investment and Tourism  Labor
Greg Warren Shadow Minister for Western Sydney Greg Warren MP Portrait.jpg   Labor
Matt Kean Minister for Energy and Environment   Liberal Jihad DibShadow Minister for Energy and Climate Change Jihad Dib MP.png   Labor
Penny Sharpe MLCShadow Minister for the Environment Penny Sharpe MLC, Nov 2012.jpg   Labor
Tania Mihailuk Shadow Minister for Natural Resources  Labor
Adam Marshall Minister for Agriculture and Western New South Wales Adammarshallmp.jpg   National Mick Veitch MLCShadow Minister for Agriculture
Shadow Minister for Western New South Wales
Mich Veitch MLC.jpg   Labor
Anthony Roberts Minister for Counter Terrorism and Corrections Anthony Roberts 2016.jpg   Liberal Tara Moriarty MLCShadow Minister for Corrections and Juvenile Justice  Labor
Walt Secord MLCShadow Minister for Counter-Terrorism  Labor
Shelley Hancock Minister for Local Government Shelley Hancock Official Photo.jpg   Liberal Greg WarrenShadow Minister for Local Government Greg Warren MP Portrait.jpg   Labor
Kevin Anderson Minister for Innovation and Better Regulation   National Courtney Houssos MLCShadow Minister for Better Regulation and Innovation  Labor
Geoff Lee Minister for Skills and Tertiary Education   Liberal Tim Crakanthorp Shadow Minister for Skills, TAFE and Tertiary Education  Labor
Natalie Ward MLC Minister for Sport, Multiculturalism, Seniors and Veterans   Liberal Julia Finn Shadow Minister for Sport  Labor
Steve KamperShadow Minister for Multiculturalism  Labor
Greg WarrenShadow Minister for Veterans Greg Warren MP Portrait.jpg   Labor
Jodie HarrisonShadow Minister for Seniors Jodie Harrison MP.png   Labor
Bronwyn Taylor MLC Minister for Mental Health, Regional Youth and Women   National Shadow Minister for Womens
Ryan ParkShadow Minister for Mental Health  Labor
Julia FinnShadow Minister for Youth  Labor
Alister Henskens Minister for Families, Communities and Disability Services   Liberal Kate Washington Shadow Minister for Family and Community Services
Shadow Minister for Disability Inclusion
  Labor
Damien Tudehope MLC Minister for Finance and Small Business   Liberal Anoulack ChanthivongShadow Minister for Finance  Labor
Steve KamperShadow Minister for Small Business  Labor

See also

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References

  1. "Governor's role". Governor of New South Wales. Retrieved 2 January 2021.
  2. "The Executive Council". www.parliament.nsw.gov.au. Retrieved 31 January 2018.
  3. Pledge of Loyalty Act 2006 (NSW)
  4. "Government Notices (30)" (PDF). Government Gazette of the State of New South Wales . 2 April 2019. p. 1088-1090. Retrieved 3 April 2019.
  5. "Premier announces new Cabinet" (Press release). Premier of New South Wales. 31 March 2019. Retrieved 3 April 2019.
  6. "Shadow Ministry". Members. Parliament of New South Wales. January 2017. Retrieved 19 January 2018.