Minister for Local Government (New South Wales)

Last updated

Minister for Local Government
Coat of Arms of New South Wales.svg
Shelley Hancock Official Photo.jpg
Incumbent
Shelley Hancock

since 2 April 2019 (2019-04-02)
Department of Planning and Industry
Style The Honourable
Nominator Premier of New South Wales
Appointer Governor of New South Wales
Inaugural holder John Daniel FitzGerald
Formation15 November 1916
Website www.olg.nsw.gov.au

The New South Wales Minister for Local Government is a minister in the New South Wales Government and has responsibilities which includes all local government areas and related legislation in New South Wales, the most primary of which is the Local Government Act 1993. The minister administers the portfolio through the Department of Planning and Industry.

Contents

The Minister for Local Government is Shelley Hancock since 2 April 2019. The minister works within the cluster, and assists the senior cluster minister, the Deputy Premier and Minister for Regional New South Wales, Industry and Trade, currently John Barilaro, also since 2 April 2019. [1] Ultimately both ministers are responsible to the Parliament of New South Wales.

Administrative history

With the significant expansion of Local Government areas in the early 1900s the first formal government body with the specific responsibility for Local Government was established by the Local Government (Shires) Act, 1905, which created the "Local Government Branch" of the Public Works Department on 9 December 1905. On 5 January 1906 the Secretary for Public Works was charged with its administration. [2] On 15 March 1915 the Local Government Branch was made independent as the "Department of Local Government" and the process of its full establishment culminated with the appointment of the first Minister for Local Government on 15 November 1916, John Daniel FitzGerald. Fitzgerald was responsible for steering through the first major piece of legislation dealing with local government regulations and powers in the Local Government Act 1919 . [3] The new Act provided for the establishment of County Councils to enable Municipalities and Shires to combine for the carrying out of large works that affected more than one district, most prominently in the area of electricity supply, with the Sydney County Council being a prime example. [3]

In February 1936 the Department merged with the Public Works department to become the "Department of Works and Local Government". [4] On 2 June 1941, this short-lived department was abolished and "Department of Local Government and Housing" succeeded it. The then Minister for Local Government and Housing took on responsibilities for social housing in the state. [5] This body then became the Department of Local Government again on 8 June 1944. [6] In 1948 the new Minister Joseph Cahill was responsible for moving the most significant reform to local government since 1919 when he passed through the Local Government (Areas) Act 1948 , which placed the City of Sydney within the regulations of the 1919 act (by repealing the Sydney Corporations Act 1932) and entailed large-scale amalgamations of local councils in Sydney.

On 6 November 1981 the Department was abolished and replaced by the "Local Government Office" of the Department of Local Government and Lands. On 29 February 1984 a new Department of Local Government replaced the functions of the Office of Local Government. [7] This Department of Local Government was amalgamated with the Registry of Co-operatives on 1 July 1991 to create the Department of Local Government and Co-operatives headed by the Minister for Local Government and Co-operatives. [8] The second minister of this title, Garry West, was responsible for the passing of the Local Government Act 1993, which repealed the 1919 act, modernised the controls and powers of Local Government and formalised the command structure with the Minister at its head. This continues to be the main piece of legislation operated by the Minister today. On 6 April 1995 the responsibility for co-operatives was transferred to the Department of Consumer Affairs. [9]

On 1 July 2009 the Department of Local Government was abolished and its functions were transferred to the Department of Premier and Cabinet as the Office of Local Government. [9] In 2011 these functions were moved to the Department of Planning and Environment. Following the 2019 state election, the Office of Local Government was abolished and its functions, together with a broad range of other functions were transferred to the newly-formed Department of Planning and Industry. [10]

Ministerial powers

The minister has significant powers to regulate and control the operations of local governments. Currently, under section 255 of the Local Government Act 1993, the Minister has the power initiate investigations or a public inquiry into the behaviours of councillors and council staff and, if the findings are against the council's ability to operate within the law or public expectations, the minister can then recommend to the Governor for dismissal of the council. Prominent examples of this occurring under the 1993 Act and previous Acts include:

List of ministers

Local government

MinisterParty affiliationMinisterial titleTerm startTerm endTime in officeNotes
John FitzGerald Nationalist Minister for Local Government15 November 191612 April 19203 years, 149 days
Thomas Mutch Labor 12 April 192010 October 1921
George Cann 10 October 192120 December 1921
John Fitzpatrick Nationalist20 December 192120 December 19210 days
George CannLabor20 December 192113 April 1922
John FitzpatrickNationalist13 April 192217 June 1925
George CannLabor17 June 192524 March 1926
Joseph Fitzgerald 24 March 192626 May 1927
Tom Keegan 26 May 192718 October 1927
Michael Bruxner Country 18 October 19273 November 1930
William McKell Labor4 November 193017 June 1931
James McGirr 17 June 193115 October 1931
Labor (NSW) 15 October 193113 May 1932
Michael BruxnerCountry16 May 193217 June 1932
Joseph Jackson United Australia 18 June 193214 February 1933
Eric Spooner 15 February 193321 July 1939
Bertram Stevens 21 July 19395 August 1939
Alexander Mair 5 August 193916 August 1939
Lewis Martin 16 August 193916 May 1941
James McGirrLaborMinister for Local Government and Housing 16 May 19418 June 19443 years, 23 days
Joseph Cahill Minister for Local Government8 June 194423 February 19538 years, 260 days
Jack Renshaw 23 February 195328 October 19596 years, 247 days
Pat Hills 28 October 195913 May 19655 years, 197 days
Pat Morton Liberal 13 May 196519 June 19727 years, 37 days
Charles Cutler Country19 June 197216 December 1975
Col Fisher Liberal17 December 197523 January 1976
Tom Lewis 23 January 197614 May 1976
Harry Jensen Labor14 May 19762 October 1981
Lin Gordon 2 October 198110 February 1984
Kevin Stewart 10 February 19841 January 1986
Peter Anderson 1 January 19866 February 1986
Janice Crosio 6 February 198621 March 1988
David Hay Liberal25 March 19886 June 1991
Gerry Peacocke Country6 June 199126 May 1993
Garry West Minister for Local Government and Co-operatives 26 May 199327 June 1994
Ted Pickering Liberal27 June 19944 April 1995
Ernie Page LaborMinister for Local Government4 April 19958 April 1999
Harry Woods 8 April 19992 April 2003
Tony Kelly 2 April 20033 August 2005
Kerry Hickey 3 August 20052 April 2007
Paul Lynch 2 April 20075 September 2008
Barbara Perry 8 September 200828 March 2011
Don Page National2 April 201123 April 20143 years, 21 days
Paul Toole 23 April 201430 January 20172 years, 282 days
Gabrielle Upton Liberal30 January 201723 March 20192 years, 52 days [12]
Shelley Hancock 2 April 2019incumbent338 days [1]

Former ministerial titles

Assistant ministers

MinisterParty affiliationMinisterial titleTerm startTerm endTime in office
Joseph Fitzgerald LaborAssistant Minister for Local Government17 June 192524 March 1926280 days
Jack Renshaw LaborAssistant Minister for Local Government3 April 195223 February 1953326 days

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References

  1. 1 2 "Government Notices (30)" (PDF). Government Gazette of the State of New South Wales . 2 April 2019. p. 1088-1090. Retrieved 3 April 2019.
  2. "Local Government Branch [Public Works Department]". NSW State Records. NSW Government. Retrieved 18 September 2015.
  3. 1 2 "Department of Local Government [I]". NSW State Records. NSW Government. Retrieved 18 September 2015.
  4. "Department of Works and Local Government". NSW State Records. NSW Government. Retrieved 18 September 2015.
  5. "Department of Local Government and Housing". NSW State Records. NSW Government. Retrieved 18 September 2015.
  6. "Department of Local Government [II]". NSW State Records. NSW Government. Retrieved 18 September 2015.
  7. "Department of Local Government [III]". NSW State Records. NSW Government. Retrieved 18 September 2015.
  8. "Department of Local Government and Co-operatives". NSW State Records. NSW Government. Retrieved 18 September 2015.
  9. 1 2 "Department of Local Government [IV]". NSW State Records. NSW Government. Retrieved 18 September 2015.
  10. "Administrative Arrangements (Administrative Changes—Public Service Agencies) Order 2019 [NSW] (159)" (PDF). Government Gazette of the State of New South Wales . 2 April 2019. p. 7-8. Retrieved 4 April 2019.
  11. 1 2 3 4 5 Black, Sophie (4 March 2008). "Australia's dodgiest local councils — a Crikey list". Crikey. Retrieved 25 September 2015.
  12. "Refreshed NSW cabinet sworn in". Sky News . Australia. AAP. 30 January 2017. Retrieved 30 January 2017.