List of political parties in Australia

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This article lists political parties in Australia.

The Australian federal parliament has a number of distinctive features including compulsory voting, with full-preference instant-runoff voting in single-member seats to elect the lower house, the Australian House of Representatives, and the use of the single transferable vote to elect the upper house, the Australian Senate.

Compulsory voting requires citizens to register to vote and to go to their polling place or vote on election day

Compulsory voting is an effect of laws which require eligible citizens to register and vote in elections, and may impose penalties on those who fail to do so. As of August 2013, 22 countries provide for compulsory voting, and 11 democracies — about 5% of all United Nations members — enforce it.

Instant-runoff voting (IRV) is a type of preferential voting method used in single-seat elections with more than two candidates. Instead of voting only for a single candidate, voters in IRV elections can rank the candidates in order of preference. Ballots are initially counted for each elector's top choice, losing candidates are eliminated, and ballots for losing candidates are redistributed until one candidate is the top remaining choice of a majority of the voters. When the field is reduced to two, it has become an "instant runoff" that allows a comparison of the top two candidates head-to-head.

A single-member district or single-member constituency is an electoral district that returns one officeholder to a body with multiple members such as a legislature. This is also sometimes called single-winner voting or winner takes all. The alternative are multi-member districts, or the election of a body by the whole electorate voting as one constituency.

Contents

Australia has a mild two-party system, with two dominant political groupings in the Australian political system, the Australian Labor Party and the Liberal/National Coalition. Federally, 6 of the 150 members of the lower house (Members of Parliament, or MPs) are not members of major parties, as are 19 of the 76 members of the upper house (senators).

A two-party system is a party system where two major political parties dominate the government. One of the two parties typically holds a majority in the legislature and is usually referred to as the majority or governing party while the other is the minority or opposition party. Around the world, the term has different senses. For example, in the United States, Jamaica, and Malta, the sense of two-party system describes an arrangement in which all or nearly all elected officials belong to one of the only two major parties, and third parties rarely win any seats in the legislature. In such arrangements, two-party systems are thought to result from various factors like winner-takes-all election rules. In such systems, while chances for third-party candidates winning election to major national office are remote, it is possible for groups within the larger parties, or in opposition to one or both of them, to exert influence on the two major parties. In contrast, in the United Kingdom and Australia and in other parliamentary systems and elsewhere, the term two-party system is sometimes used to indicate an arrangement in which two major parties dominate elections but in which there are viable third parties which do win seats in the legislature, and in which the two major parties exert proportionately greater influence than their percentage of votes would suggest.

Australian Labor Party Political party in Australia

The Australian Labor Party is a major centre-left political party in Australia. The party has been in opposition at the federal level since the 2013 election. Bill Shorten has been the party's federal parliamentary leader since 13 October 2013. The party is a federal party with branches in each state and territory. Labor is in government in the states of Victoria, Queensland, Western Australia, and in both the Australian Capital Territory and Northern Territory. The party competes against the Liberal/National Coalition for political office at the federal and state levels. It is the oldest political party in Australia.

The Coalition is an alliance of centre-right political parties that forms one of the two major groupings in Australian federal politics. Its main opponent is the Australian Labor Party (ALP), and the two forces are often regarded as operating in a two-party system. The Coalition has been in government since the 2013 federal election. The party is currently led by Scott Morrison as Prime Minister of Australia since August 2018.

Other parties tend to perform better in the upper houses of the various federal and state parliament since these typically use a form of proportional representation.

Proportional representation (PR) characterizes electoral systems in which divisions in an electorate are reflected proportionately in the elected body. If n% of the electorate support a particular political party, then roughly n% of seats will be won by that party. The essence of such systems is that all votes contribute to the result - not just a plurality, or a bare majority. The most prevalent forms of proportional representation all require the use of multiple-member voting districts, as it is not possible to fill a single seat in a proportional manner. In fact, the implementations of PR that achieve the highest levels of proportionality tend to include districts with large numbers of seats.

Federal parties

Federal parliamentary parties

The Women's PartyAbbr.LeaderEqual Representation, Feminist, Anti-Corruption.MPs 0Senators 0
The Coalition
Liberal Party of Australia Liberal Scott Morrison Liberal conservatism
Economic liberalism
45 / 150
22 / 76
National Party of Australia National Michael McCormack Conservatism
Agrarianism
10 / 150
3 / 76
Liberal National Party
(Queensland)
[lower-alpha 1]
LNP Deb Frecklington Liberal conservatism
21 / 150
5 / 76
Country Liberal Party
(Northern Territory)
[lower-alpha 2]
Country Liberals Gary Higgins Liberal conservatism
0 / 150
1 / 76
Australian Labor Party Labor, ALP Bill Shorten Social democracy
69 / 150
26 / 76
Australian Greens Greens Richard Di Natale Green politics
1 / 150
9 / 76
Centre Alliance CANone Centrism
Social liberalism
1 / 150
2 / 76
Katter's Australian Party KAP Bob Katter Australian nationalism
Economic nationalism
1 / 150
0 / 76
Pauline Hanson's One Nation One Nation, PHON Pauline Hanson Australian nationalism
Right-wing populism
0 / 150
2 / 76
Derryn Hinch's Justice Party Justice Derryn Hinch Justice reform
Anti-paedophilia
0 / 150
1 / 76
Liberal Democratic Party Liberal Democrats David Leyonhjelm Libertarianism
Classical liberalism
0 / 150
1 / 76
Australian Conservatives Conservatives Cory Bernardi Conservatism
Social conservatism
0 / 150
1 / 76
United Australia Party UAP Clive Palmer Right-wing populism
Economic liberalism
0 / 150
1 / 76

Two political groups dominate the Australian political spectrum, forming a de facto two-party system. One is the Australian Labor Party (ALP), a centre-left party which is formally linked to the Australian labour movement. Formed in 1893, it has been a major party federally since 1901, and has been one of the two major parties since the 1910 federal election. The ALP is in government in Victoria, Queensland, Western Australia, the Northern Territory and the Australian Capital Territory.

The Australian labour movement has its origins in the early 19th century and includes both trade unions and political activity. At its broadest, the movement encompasses an industrial wing and a political wing. Trade unions in Australia may be organised on the basis of craft unionism, general unionism, or industrial unionism. Almost all unions in Australia are affiliated with the Australian Council of Trade Unions (ACTU), many of which have undergone a significant process of amalgamations, especially in the late 1980s and early 1990s. The leadership and membership of unions hold and have at other times held a wide range of political views, including communist, socialist and right-wing views.

Victoria (Australia) State in Australia

Victoria is a state in south-eastern Australia. Victoria is Australia's most densely populated state and its second-most populous state overall. Most of its population lives concentrated in the area surrounding Port Phillip Bay, which includes the metropolitan area of its state capital and largest city, Melbourne, Australia's second-largest city. Geographically the smallest state on the Australian mainland, Victoria is bordered by Bass Strait and Tasmania to the south, New South Wales to the north, the Tasman Sea to the east, and South Australia to the west.

Queensland North-east state of Australia

Queensland is the second-largest and third-most populous state in the Commonwealth of Australia. Situated in the north-east of the country, it is bordered by the Northern Territory, South Australia and New South Wales to the west, south-west and south respectively. To the east, Queensland is bordered by the Coral Sea and Pacific Ocean. To its north is the Torres Strait, with Papua New Guinea located less than 200 km across it from the mainland. The state is the world's sixth-largest sub-national entity, with an area of 1,852,642 square kilometres (715,309 sq mi).

The other group is a conservative grouping of parties that are in coalition at the federal level, as well as in New South Wales, but compete in Western Australia and South Australia. The main party in this group is the center-right Liberal Party. The Liberal Party is the modern form of a conservative grouping that has existed since the fusion of the Protectionist Party and Free Trade Party into the Commonwealth Liberal Party in 1909. Although this group has changed its nomenclature, there has been a general continuity of MPs and structure between different forms of the party. Its modern form was founded by Robert Menzies in 1944. The party's philosophy is generally liberal conservatism.

New South Wales State of Australia

New South Wales is a state on the east coast of Australia. It borders Queensland to the north, Victoria to the south, and South Australia to the west. Its coast borders the Tasman Sea to the east. The Australian Capital Territory is an enclave within the state. New South Wales' state capital is Sydney, which is also Australia's most populous city. In March 2018, the population of New South Wales was over 7.9 million, making it Australia's most populous state. Just under two-thirds of the state's population, 5.1 million, live in the Greater Sydney area. Inhabitants of New South Wales are referred to as New South Welshmen.

Western Australia state in Australia

Western Australia is a state occupying the entire western third of Australia. It is bounded by the Indian Ocean to the north and west, and the Southern Ocean to the south, the Northern Territory to the north-east and South Australia to the south-east. Western Australia is Australia's largest state, with a total land area of 2,529,875 square kilometres, and the second-largest country subdivision in the world, surpassed only by Russia's Sakha Republic. The state has about 2.6 million inhabitants – around 11 percent of the national total – of whom the vast majority live in the south-west corner, 79 per cent of the population living in the Perth area, leaving the remainder of the state sparsely populated.

South Australia State of Australia

South Australia is a state in the southern central part of Australia. It covers some of the most arid parts of the country. With a total land area of 983,482 square kilometres (379,725 sq mi), it is the fourth-largest of Australia's states and territories by area, and fifth largest by population. It has a total of 1.7 million people, and its population is the second most highly centralised in Australia, after Western Australia, with more than 77 percent of South Australians living in the capital, Adelaide, or its environs. Other population centres in the state are relatively small; Mount Gambier, the second largest centre, has a population of less than 30,000.

Every elected prime minister of Australia since 1910 has been a member of either the Labor Party, the Liberal Party, or one of the Liberal Party's previous incarnations (the Commonwealth Liberal Party, the Nationalist Party of Australia, or the United Australia Party).

The Commonwealth Liberal Party was a political movement active in Australia from 1909 to 1917, shortly after Federation. The CLP came about as a result of a merger between the two non-Labor parties, the Protectionist Party and the Anti-Socialist Party which most of their MPs accepted. The CLP is the earliest direct ancestor of the current Liberal Party of Australia.

The United Australia Party (UAP) was an Australian political party that was founded in 1931 and dissolved in 1945. The party won four federal elections in that time, usually governing in coalition with the Country Party. It provided two Prime Ministers of Australia – Joseph Lyons (1932–1939) and Robert Menzies (1939–1941).

The Liberal Party is joined by the National Party, a party that seeks to represent rural interests, especially agricultural ones. The Nationals contest a limited number of seats and do not generally directly compete with the Liberal Party. Its ideology is generally more socially conservative than that of the Liberal Party. In 1987, the National Party made an abortive run for the office of prime minister in its own right, in the Joh for Canberra campaign. However, it has generally not aspired to become the majority party in the coalition, and it is generally understood that the prime minister of Australia will be a member of either the Labor or Liberal parties. On two occasions (involving Earle Page in 1939, and John McEwen from December 1967 to January 1968), the deputy prime minister, the leader of the National Party (then known as the Country Party), became the prime minister temporarily, upon the death of the incumbent prime minister. Arthur Fadden was the only other Country Party, prime minister. He assumed office in August 1941 after the resignation of Robert Menzies and served as prime minister until October of that year.

The Liberal and National parties have merged in Queensland and the Northern Territory, although the resultant parties are different. The Liberal National Party of Queensland, formed in 2008, is a branch of the Liberal Party, but it is affiliated with the Nationals and members elected to federal parliament may sit as either Liberals or Nationals. The Country Liberal Party was formed in 1978 when the Northern Territory gained responsible government. It is a separate member of the federal coalition, but it is affiliated with the two major members and its president has voting rights in the National Party. The name refers to the older name of the National Party.

Federally, these parties are collectively known as the Coalition. The Coalition has existed continually (between the Nationals and their predecessors, and the Liberals and their predecessors) since 1923, with minor breaks in 1940, 1973, and 1987.

Historically, support for either the Coalition or the Labor Party was often viewed as being based on social class, with the upper and middle classes supporting the Coalition and the working class supporting Labor. This has been a less important factor since the 1970s and 1980s when the Labor Party gained a significant bloc of middle-class support and the Coalition gained a significant bloc of working-class support. [1]

The two-party duopoly has been relatively stable, with the two groupings (Labor and Coalition) gaining at least 70% of the primary vote in every election since 1910 (including the votes of autonomous state parties). Third parties have only rarely received more than 10% of the vote for the Australian House of Representatives in a federal election, such as the Australian Democrats in the 1990 election and the Australian Greens in 2010, and 2016.

Federal non-parliamentary parties

Parties listed in alphabetical order as of 30 January 2019: [2]

NameLeaderIdeology
Animal Justice Party Bruce Poon Animal rights
Australia First Party (NSW) Incorporated James Saleam Neo-nazism
Ultranationalism
Australian Affordable Housing Party Andrew Potts Affordable housing
Australian Better Families Men's rights
Australian Christians Ray Moran Social conservatism
Christian right
Australian Country Party Robert Danieli Social conservatism
Economic nationalism
Australian Liberty Alliance Anti-Islam
Right-wing populism
Australian People's Party Gabriel Harfouche Australian nationalism
Economic nationalism
Australian Progressives Vinay Orekondy Progressivism
Australian Workers Party Mark Ptolemy Modern Monetary Theory
Social democracy
Christian Democratic Party (Fred Nile Group) Fred Nile National conservatism
Christian right
Citizens Electoral Council of Australia Craig Isherwood LaRouche Movement
Climate Action! Immigration Action! Accountable Politicians! Berge Der Sarkissian Electronic direct democracy
Democratic Labour Party (DLP) Social conservatism
Distributism
Health Australia Party Andrew Patterson Anti-vaccination
Naturopathy
Help End Marijuana Prohibition (HEMP) Party Michael Balderstone Cannabis legalisation
Involuntary Medication Objectors (Vaccination/Fluoride) Party Michael O'Neill [3] Anti-vaccination
Anti-fluoride
Jacqui Lambie Network Jacqui Lambie Australian nationalism
Tasmanian Regionalism
Love Australia or Leave Kim Vuga Anti-immigration
Anti-Islam
Non-Custodial Parents Party (Equal Parenting) Andrew Thompson Fathers' rights
Pirate Party Australia Simon Frew Pirate politics
E-democracy
Reason Australia Fiona Patten Civil libertarianism
Progressivism
Republican Party of Australia Kerry Bromson Republicanism
Rise Up Australia Party Daniel Nalliah Australian nationalism
Anti-Islam
Science Party James Jansson Techno-progressivism
Technocentrism
Secular Party of Australia John Perkins Secular humanism
Secular liberalism
Seniors United Party of Australia Pensioners' interests
Shooters, Fishers and Farmers Party Robert Brown Conservatism
Gun rights
Socialist Alliance Collective leadership Socialism
Anti-capitalism
Socialist Equality Party Nick Beams Trotskyism
Anti-capitalism
#Sustainable Australia William Bourke Lower immigration
Anti-overdevelopment
Green liberalism
The Arts Party P. J. Collins Progressivism
Humanism
The Australian Mental Health Party Dr Ben Mullings
Tim Storer Independent SA Party Tim Storer
Voluntary Euthanasia Party Legalised euthanasia
VOTEFLUX.ORG | Upgrade Democracy! Nathan Spataro Electronic direct democracy
Western Australia Party Julie Matheson Regionalism

State parties

New South Wales

Divisions of the federal parties: [4]

NameAbbr.LeaderIdeologyMLAsMLCsFederal division
The Coalition
Liberal Party of Australia (NSW Division) Liberals Gladys Berejiklian Liberal conservatism
36 / 93
13 / 42
Green check.svg
National Party of Australia – NSW National John Barilaro Conservatism
Agrarianism
16 / 93
7 / 42
Green check.svg
Australian Labor Party (NSW Branch) Labor, ALP Luke Foley Social democracy
34 / 93
14 / 42
Green check.svg
Greens NSW GreensCollective leadership Green politics
3 / 93
5 / 42
Green check.svg
Shooters, Fishers and Farmers Party SFF Robert Brown Conservatism
Gun rights
1 / 93
2 / 42
Green check.svg
Christian Democratic Party (Fred Nile Group) CDP Paul Green National conservatism
Christian right
0 / 93
2 / 42
Green check.svg
Animal Justice Party Animal Justice Mark Pearson Animal rights
0 / 93
1 / 42
Green check.svg
Country Labor Party Country Labor Social democracy
0 / 93
0 / 42
Green check.svg
Voluntary Euthanasia Party (NSW) Voluntary EuthanasiaShayne Higson Legalised euthanasia
0 / 93
0 / 42
Green check.svg
Flux Party (NSW) FluxNathan Spataro Direct democracy
0 / 93
0 / 42
Green check.svg
Socialist Alliance Collective leadership Socialism
Anti-capitalism
0 / 93
0 / 42
Green check.svg
Building Australia Party Building Australia Building industry advocacy
0 / 93
0 / 42
Dark Red x.svg
Keep Sydney Open Anti-lockout laws
0 / 93
0 / 42
Dark Red x.svg
Australian Conservatives (NSW) Conservatives Conservatism
Social conservatism
0 / 93
0 / 42
Green check.svg
Liberal Democratic Party Liberal Democrats Libertarianism
0 / 93
0 / 42
Green check.svg
Pauline Hanson's One Nation One Nation, PHON Mark Latham Australian nationalism
Right-wing populism
0 / 93
0 / 42
Green check.svg
Sustainable Australia (NSW) Lower immigration
Anti-overdevelopment
Green liberalism
0 / 93
0 / 42
Green check.svg
Small Business Party Small BusinessSmall business advocacy
0 / 93
0 / 42
Dark Red x.svg

Victoria

Divisions of the federal parties [5]

NameAbbr.LeaderIdeologyMLAsMLCsFederal division
Australian Labor Party (Victorian Branch) Labor, ALP Daniel Andrews Social democracy
55 / 88
18 / 40
Green check.svg
The Coalition
Liberal Party of Australia (Victorian Division) Liberal Michael O'Brien Liberal conservatism
Economic liberalism
21 / 88
10 / 40
Green check.svg
National Party of Australia – Victoria National Peter Walsh Conservatism
Agrarianism
6 / 88
1 / 40
Green check.svg
Australian Greens Victoria Greens Samantha Ratnam Green politics
3 / 88
1 / 40
Green check.svg
Derryn Hinch's Justice Party Justice Stuart Grimley Justice reform
Anti-paedophilia
0 / 88
2 / 40
Green check.svg
Liberal Democratic Party Liberal Democrats Libertarianism
0 / 88
2 / 40
Green check.svg
Shooters, Fishers and Farmers Party (Victoria) SFF Conservatism
Gun rights
0 / 88
1 / 40
Green check.svg
Fiona Patten's Reason Party Reason Fiona Patten Civil libertarianism
0 / 88
1 / 40
Green check.svg
Sustainable Australia Lower immigration
Anti-overdevelopment
Green liberalism
0 / 88
1 / 40
Green check.svg
Animal Justice Party Animal Justice Animal rights
0 / 88
1 / 40
Green check.svg
Transport Matters Party Transport Matters Taxi industry advocacy
0 / 88
1 / 40
Dark Red x.svg
Victorian Socialists SocialistsCollective leadership Socialism
Anti-capitalism
0 / 88
0 / 40
Dark Red x.svg
Australian Conservatives – Victorian Branch Conservatives Conservatism
0 / 88
0 / 40
Green check.svg
Australian Country Party Country Australian nationalism
Economic nationalism
0 / 88
0 / 40
Green check.svg
Democratic Labour Party DLP Social conservatism
Christian democracy
0 / 88
0 / 40
Green check.svg
Socialist Alliance (Victoria) Collective leadership Socialism
Anti-capitalism
0 / 88
0 / 40
Green check.svg
Health Australia Party Health Australia Naturopathy
Anti-vaccination
0 / 88
0 / 40
Green check.svg
Voluntary Euthanasia Party (Victoria) Voluntary Euthanasia Legalised euthanasia
0 / 88
0 / 40
Green check.svg
Aussie Battler Party Aussie Battler Australian nationalism
Populism
0 / 88
0 / 40
Dark Red x.svg
Hudson for Northern Victoria H4NVJosh Hudson Regionalism
0 / 88
0 / 40
Dark Red x.svg
Vote 1 Local Jobs Local Jobs James Purcell Regionalism
0 / 88
0 / 40
Dark Red x.svg
Australian Liberty Alliance Liberty Alliance Australian nationalism
Right-wing populism
0 / 88
0 / 40
Green check.svg
Pauline Hanson's One Nation One Nation,
PHON
Australian nationalism
Right-wing populism
0 / 88
0 / 40
Green check.svg

Queensland

As of the Queensland Electoral Commission: [6]

NameAbbr.LeaderIdeologyMPsFederal division
Australian Labor Party (Queensland Branch) Labor, ALP Annastacia Palaszczuk Social democracy
48 / 93
Green check.svg
Liberal National Party of Queensland LNP Deb Frecklington Liberal conservatism
39 / 93
Green check.svg
Katter's Australian Party KAP Robbie Katter Australian nationalism
Economic nationalism
3 / 93
Green check.svg
Pauline Hanson's One Nation One Nation Steve Dickson Right-wing populism
Anti-immigration
1 / 93
Green check.svg
Queensland Greens Greens Michael Berkman Green politics
1 / 93
Green check.svg
Flux Party Queensland FluxNathan Spataro Direct democracy
0 / 93
Green check.svg
Civil Liberties, Consumer Rights, No-Tolls No-TollsJeffrey Hodges Public ownership
0 / 93
Dark Red x.svg

Western Australia

As of the Western Australian Electoral Commission: [7]

NameAbbr.LeaderIdeologyMLAsMLCsFederal division
Australian Labor Party (WA Branch) Labor, ALP Mark McGowan Social democracy
40 / 59
14 / 36
Green check.svg
Liberal Party of Australia (WA Division) Liberal Mike Nahan Liberal conservatism
Economic liberalism
14 / 59
9 / 36
Green check.svg
National Party of Australia (WA) Nationals Mia Davies Conservatism
Agrarianism
5 / 59
4 / 36
Green check.svg
Greens WA Greens Green politics
0 / 59
4 / 36
Green check.svg
Pauline Hanson's One Nation One Nation, PHON Colin Tincknell Australian nationalism
Right-wing populism
0 / 59
3 / 36
Green check.svg
Shooters, Fishers and Farmers Party (WA) Inc SFF Conservatism
Gun rights
0 / 59
1 / 36
Green check.svg
Liberal Democratic Party Liberal Democrats Libertarianism
0 / 59
1 / 36
Green check.svg
Australian Christians (WA) Christians Conservatism
Christian right
0 / 59
0 / 36
Green check.svg
Animal Justice Party Animal Justice Animal rights
0 / 59
0 / 36
Green check.svg
Socialist Alliance WA Collective leadership Socialism
Anti-capitalism
0 / 59
0 / 36
Green check.svg
Flux Party WA FluxNathan Spataro Direct democracy
0 / 59
0 / 36
Green check.svg
Daylight Saving Party Daylight SavingsWilson Tucker Daylight savings advocacy
0 / 59
0 / 36
Dark Red x.svg
Fluoride Free WA Fluoride FreeAnne Porter Anti-fluoridation
0 / 59
0 / 36
Dark Red x.svg
Western Australia Party WAPJulie Matheson Regionalism
Centrism
0 / 59
0 / 36
Green check.svg
Small Business Party John Golawski Small business advocacy
0 / 59
0 / 36
Dark Red x.svg

South Australia

List of parties: [8]

NameAbbr.LeaderIdeologyMHAsMLCsFederal division
Liberal Party of Australia (SA Division) Liberals Steven Marshall Liberal conservatism
Economic liberalism
25 / 47
9 / 22
Green check.svg
Australian Labor Party (SA Branch) Labor, ALP Peter Malinauskas Social democracy
19 / 47
8 / 22
Green check.svg
Greens SA Greens Mark Parnell Green politics
0 / 47
2 / 22
Green check.svg
Nick Xenophon's SA-BEST SA-BEST Nick Xenophon Centrism
Social liberalism
0 / 47
2 / 22
Green check.svg
Advance SA John Darley Centrism
0 / 47
1 / 22
Dark Red x.svg
National Party of Australia (SA) National Conservatism
Agrarianism
0 / 47
0 / 22
Green check.svg
Liberal Democratic Party Liberal Democrats Libertarianism
0 / 47
0 / 22
Green check.svg
Animal Justice Party Animal Justice Animal rights
0 / 47
0 / 22
Green check.svg
Australian Conservatives (SA) Conservatives Conservatism
Social conservatism
0 / 47
0 / 22
Green check.svg
Dignity Party Dignity Kelly Vincent Equal rights
0 / 47
0 / 22
Dark Red x.svg
Danig Party Danig
0 / 47
0 / 22
Dark Red x.svg
Stop Population Growth Now Bob Couch Anti-immigration
0 / 47
0 / 22
Dark Red x.svg
Child Protection Party Child ProtectionTony Tonkin
0 / 47
0 / 22
Dark Red x.svg

Tasmania

As of the Tasmanian Electoral Commission: [9]

NameAbbr.LeaderIdeologyMHAsMLCsFederal division
Liberal Party of Australia (Tasmanian Division) Liberals Will Hodgman Liberal conservatism
13 / 25
2 / 15
Green check.svg
Australian Labor Party (Tasmanian Branch) Labor Rebecca White Social democracy
10 / 25
4 / 15
Green check.svg
Tasmanian Greens Greens Cassy O'Connor Green politics
2 / 25
0 / 15
Green check.svg
Jacqui Lambie Network JLN Jacqui Lambie Populism
Regionalism
0 / 25
0 / 15
Green check.svg
Shooters and Fishers Party Tasmania SFF Conservatism
Gun rights
0 / 25
0 / 15
Green check.svg
Socialist Alliance Collective leadership Socialism
Anti-capitalism
0 / 25
0 / 15
Green check.svg
Australian Christians Christians Conservatism
Christian right
0 / 25
0 / 15
Green check.svg
Tasmanians 4 Tasmania T4T Populism
Protectionism
0 / 25
0 / 15
Dark Red x.svg

Australian Capital Territory

As listed with the ACT Electoral Commission. [10]

NameAbbr.LeaderIdeologyMPsFederal division
Australian Labor Party (ACT Branch) Labor, ALP Andrew Barr Social democracy
12 / 25
Green check.svg
Liberal Party of Australia (ACT Branch) Liberals Alistair Coe Liberal conservatism
Economic liberalism
11 / 25
Green check.svg
ACT Greens Greens Shane Rattenbury Green politics
2 / 25
Green check.svg
Liberal Democratic Party Liberal Democrats Libertarianism
0 / 25
Green check.svg
Animal Justice Party Animal Justice Animal rights
0 / 25
Green check.svg
Flux Party (ACT) FluxNathan Spataro Direct democracy
0 / 25
Green check.svg
Sustainable Australia (ACT) Lower immigration
Anti-overdevelopment
Green liberalism [11]
0 / 25
Green check.svg
Canberra Community Voters Anti-monopoly
0 / 25
Dark Red x.svg
The Community Alliance Party (ACT)
0 / 25
Dark Red x.svg

Northern Territory

As of the Northern Territory Electoral Commission: [12]

NameAbbr.LeaderIdeologyMPsFederal division
Australian Labor Party (NT Branch) Labor, ALP Michael Gunner Social democracy
18 / 25
Green check.svg
Country Liberal Party Country Liberals Garry Higgins Liberal conservatism
Agrarianism
2 / 25
Green check.svg
Greens NT Greens Green politics
0 / 25
Green check.svg
SFF Conservatism
Gun rights
0 / 25
Green check.svg
Citizens Electoral Council (NT Division) CEC LaRouche movement
0 / 25
Green check.svg
1 Territory Party Braedon Earley Regionalism
0 / 25
Dark Red x.svg

Unregistered

These are Australian political parties which are no longer registered with any federal, state or territory political bodies, and can thus no longer contest elections. However, they still remain active in electoral politics through running candidates under a local government party, as independents, or as members of an electoral alliance. For parties that are unregistered and are no longer actively involved in electoral politics, see the list of historical political parties

Parties listed in alphabetical order:

NameAbbr.LeaderIdeologyDescription
Australian Democrats DemocratsN/A Social liberalism Deregistered in April 2015 when national membership fell below 500.
Communist Party of Australia CPABob Briton Communism Despite being non-registered, the party has elected members. Member Tony Oldfield is an elected councillor in the Auburn Council.
Progressive Labour Party PLP Democratic Socialism Registered between 19 January 1998 and 27 December 2006. Occasionally runs in elections as independents.
Socialist Alternative SAlt Trotskyism Despited being non-registered, the party runs members under the Victorian Socialists.

See also

Notes

  1. The merger of the Queensland branches of the Liberal and National parties, it only contends elections in that state. Members elected on a federal level caucus with either party according to the terms of the merger.
  2. The merger of the Northern Territory branches of the Liberal and National parties, it only contends elections in that territory. Members elected on a federal level are free to caucus with either party.

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The Australian electoral system comprises the laws and processes used for the election of members of the Australian Parliament. The system presently has a number of distinctive features including compulsory enrolment, compulsory voting, majority-preferential instant-runoff voting in single-member seats to elect the lower house, the House of Representatives, and the use of the single transferable vote proportional representation system to elect the upper house, the Senate.

2001 Australian federal election election

Federal elections were held in Australia on 10 November 2001. All 150 seats in the House of Representatives and 40 seats in the 76-member Senate were up for election. The incumbent Liberal Party of Australia led by Prime Minister of Australia John Howard and coalition partner the National Party of Australia led by John Anderson defeated the opposition Australian Labor Party led by Kim Beazley.

1998 Australian federal election

The 1998 Australian federal election was held to determine the members of the 39th Parliament of Australia. It was held on 3 October 1998. All 148 seats of the House of Representatives and 40 seats of the 76-seat Senate were up for election. The incumbent centre-right Liberal/National Coalition government led by Prime Minister John Howard of the Liberal Party and coalition partner Tim Fischer of the National Party defeated the centre-left Australian Labor Party opposition led by Opposition Leader Kim Beazley.

Premiers of the Australian states head of government in a state of Australia

The Premiers of the Australian states are the heads of the executive governments in the six states of the Commonwealth of Australia. They perform the same function at the state level as the Prime Minister of Australia performs at the national level. The territory equivalents to the Premiers are the Chief Ministers of the Northern Territory and the Australian Capital Territory. The Queen of Australia and the State Governors are the formal repositories of executive power, however, in practice, they act only on the advice of State Premiers and Ministers except in extreme circumstances.

Northern Territory Legislative Assembly legislative house of the unicameral legislature of the Northern Territory

The Legislative Assembly of the Northern Territory is the only house of the Parliament of the Northern Territory, Australia. The Legislative Assembly has 25 members, each elected for single-member electorates. The voting method changed in February 2016 from full-preferential voting to optional preferential voting. The term of the Legislative Assembly is four years, and elections are on the fourth Saturday in August of the fourth year after the previous election, but can be earlier in the event of a no confidence vote in the Government. The last election for the Legislative Assembly was the 2016 election held on 27 August 2016. The next election is scheduled for 22 August 2020.

Politics of Queensland

The politics of Queensland has several unique features with respect to other states in Australia including a unicameral legislature.

Elections in Australia discussion of elections conducted in Australia

Elections in Australia take place periodically to elect the legislature of the Commonwealth of Australia, as well as for each Australian state and territory. Elections in all jurisdictions follow similar principles, though there are minor variations between them. The elections for the Australian Parliament are held under the federal electoral system, which is uniform throughout the country, and the elections for state and territory Parliaments are held under the electoral system of each state and territory.

Division of Kennedy Australian federal electoral division

The Division of Kennedy is an Australian Electoral Division in Queensland. The division was one of the original 65 divisions contested at the first federal election. It is named after Edmund Kennedy, an explorer in the area where the division is located in Queensland.

Elections to the Australian Capital Territory Legislative Assembly were held on Saturday, 4 March 1989. This was the first direct election by voters in the Australian Capital Territory (ACT) for their own legislative body.

1987 Australian federal election

Federal elections were held in Australia on 11 July 1987, following the granting of a double dissolution on 5 June by the Governor-General Sir Ninian Stephen. Consequently, all 148 seats in the House of Representatives as well as all 76 seats in the Senate were up for election. The incumbent Australian Labor Party, led by Prime Minister Bob Hawke, defeated the opposition Liberal Party of Australia, led by John Howard and the National Party of Australia led by Ian Sinclair.

Politics of Australia

The politics of Australia take place within the framework of a federal parliamentary constitutional monarchy. Australians elect parliamentarians to the federal Parliament of Australia, a bicameral body which incorporates elements of the fused executive inherited from the Westminster system, and a strong federalist senate, adopted from the United States Congress. Australia largely operates as a two-party system in which voting is compulsory. The Economist Intelligence Unit has rated Australia as a "full democracy" in 2017.

2010 Australian federal election general election

A federal election was held on Saturday, 21 August 2010 for members of the 43rd Parliament of Australia. The incumbent centre-left Australian Labor Party led by Prime Minister Julia Gillard won a second term against the opposition centre-right Liberal Party of Australia led by Opposition Leader Tony Abbott and Coalition partner the National Party of Australia, led by Warren Truss, after Labor formed a minority government with the support of three independent MPs and one Australian Greens MP.

The history of the Australian Labor Party has its origins in the Labour parties founded in the 1890s in the Australian colonies prior to federation. Labor tradition ascribes the founding of Queensland Labour to a meeting of striking pastoral workers under a ghost gum tree in Barcaldine, Queensland in 1891. The Balmain, New South Wales branch of the party claims to be the oldest in Australia. Labour as a parliamentary party dates from 1891 in New South Wales and South Australia, 1893 in Queensland, and later in the other colonies.

2019 Australian federal election Election for the 46th Parliament of Australia

The 2019 Australian federal election will elect members of the 46th Parliament of Australia. The election will be called following the dissolution or expiry of the 45th Parliament as elected at the 2016 double dissolution federal election.

References

  1. "OzPolitics.info". OzPolitics.info. Archived from the original on 28 September 2009. Retrieved 16 June 2010.
  2. "Current Register of Political Parties". Australian Electoral Commission. Retrieved 30 January 2019.
  3. "No jab, no vote: new anti-vax party registered". Crikey. 8 November 2016. Retrieved 21 November 2016.
  4. "Information About Registered Parties". www.elections.nsw.gov.au. Retrieved 30 November 2018.
  5. "Currently registered parties". Victorian Electoral Commission . Retrieved 20 July 2017.
  6. "Political party register". Electoral Commission Queensland . Retrieved 20 July 2017.
  7. "Registered Political Parties in WA" . Retrieved 12 February 2018.
  8. "Register of political parties". Electoral Commission of South Australia . Retrieved 6 July 2017.
  9. "Party Register". Tec.tas.gov.au. Tasmanian Electoral Commission . Retrieved 20 July 2017.
  10. "Register of political parties" . Retrieved 20 July 2017.
  11. https://www.sustainableaustralia.org.au/policies . Retrieved 8 January 2019.Missing or empty |title= (help)
  12. "Register of political parties in the Northern Territory". NTEC. Retrieved 30 October 2018.