Government of Western Australia

Last updated

Government of Western Australia
State Government
Government of Western Australia logo.svg Western Australian Coat of Arms.svg
Formation
Founding documentConstitution on Western Australia
Country Australia
Website wa.gov.au
Crown
Head of state (sovereign) Charles III
Vice-regal representative Governor Chris Dawson
Seat Government House
Legislative branch
Legislature Parliament of Western Australia
Meeting place Parliament House
Executive branch
Head of Government Premier Mark McGowan
Main body Western Australian Ministry
Appointer Governor on behalf of the King of Australia in right of the State of Western Australia.
Headquarters Dumas House
Main organExecutive Council
Departments18 departments
Judicial branch
Court Supreme Court
SeatSupreme Court building, Perth

The Government of Western Australia, formally referred to as His Majesty's Government of Western Australia, is the Australian state democratic administrative authority of Western Australia. It is also commonly referred to as the WA Government or the Western Australian Government. The Government of Western Australia, a parliamentary constitutional monarchy, was formed in 1890 as prescribed in its Constitution, as amended from time to time. Since the Federation of Australia in 1901, Western Australia has been a state of the Commonwealth of Australia, and the Constitution of Australia regulates its relationship with the Commonwealth. Under the Australian Constitution, Western Australia ceded legislative and judicial supremacy to the Commonwealth, but retained powers in all matters not in conflict with the Commonwealth.

Contents

History

Executive and judicial powers

Western Australia is governed according to the principles of the Westminster system, a form of parliamentary government based on the model of the United Kingdom. Legislative power rests with the Parliament of Western Australia, which consists of Charles III, King of Australia, represented by the Governor of Western Australia, and the two Houses, the Western Australian Legislative Council (the upper house) and the Western Australian Legislative Assembly (the lower house). Executive power rests formally with the Executive Council, which consists of the Governor and senior ministers.[ citation needed ]

The Governor, as representative of the Crown, is the formal repository of power, which is exercised by him or her on the advice of the Premier of Western Australia and the Cabinet. The Premier and Ministers are appointed by the Governor, and hold office by virtue of their ability to command the support of a majority of members of the Legislative Assembly. Judicial power is exercised by the Supreme Court of Western Australia and a system of subordinate courts, but the High Court of Australia and other federal courts have overriding jurisdiction on matters which fall under the ambit of the Australian Constitution.

Ministries

As of 1 June 2021, the following individuals serve as government ministers, at the pleasure of the King, represented by the Governor of Western Australia. The government cabinet and ministers are listed in order of seniority, [1] while their opposition counterparts are listed to correspond with the government ministers. [2] All ministers and shadow ministers are members of the Parliament of Western Australia.

MinisterOfficePortraitPartyOpposition
counterpart
OfficePortraitParty
Mark McGowan MLA Premier
Minister for Public Sector Management
Minister for Federal-State Relations
Mark McGowan headshot.jpg   Labor Mia Davies MLA Leader of the Opposition
Shadow Minister for Public Sector Management
Shadow Minister for Federal-State Relations
  National
Treasurer Steve Thomas MLC Shadow Treasurer  Liberal
Roger Cook MLA Deputy Premier 3 Feb 15 FREO FSH gnangarra-123.jpg   Labor Shane Love MLA Deputy Leader of the Opposition Toodyay show gnangarra-2000.jpg   National
Minister for Health
Minister for Medical Research
Libby Mettam MLA Deputy Leader of the Liberal Party
Shadow Minister for Health
  Liberal
Martin Aldridge MLC Shadow Minister for Regional Health  National
Minister for State Development
Minister for Science
David Honey MLA Leader of the Liberal Party
Shadow Minister for State Development
Shadow Minister for Science
  Liberal
Minister for Jobs and TradeMia Davies MLAShadow Minister for Jobs and Trade  National
Sue Ellery MLC Minister for Education and Training Sue Ellery.jpg   Labor Peter Rundle MLA Shadow Minister for Education and Training  National
Leader of the Legislative CouncilSteve Thomas MLCLeader of the Opposition in the Legislative Council  Liberal
Stephen Dawson MLC Minister for Mental Health Stephen Dawson.jpg   Labor Libby Mettam MLAShadow Minister for Mental Health  Liberal
Minister for Aboriginal Affairs Vince Catania MLA Shadow Minister for Aboriginal Affairs Vince Catania.jpg   National
Minister for Industrial Relations Nick Goiran MLC Shadow Minister for Industrial Relations Nick Goiran speaking at the Threats to Freedom of Speech 2012 Conference 02.jpg   Liberal
Deputy Leader in the Legislative Council Colin de Grussa MLC Deputy Leader of the Opposition in the Legislative Council  National
Alannah MacTiernan MLC Minister for Agriculture and Food Alannah MacTiernan in December 2020 cropped.jpg   Labor Shadow Minister for Agriculture and Food
Minister for Regional Development Mia Davies MLAShadow Minister for Regional Development  National
Minister for Hydrogen IndustryDavid Honey MLAShadow Minister for Hydrogen  Liberal
David Templeman MLA Minister for Tourism   Labor Vince Catania MLAShadow Minister for Tourism Vince Catania.jpg   National
Minister for Culture and The Arts Peter Collier MLC Shadow Minister for Culture and the Arts  Liberal
Minister for Heritage Neil Thomson MLC Shadow Minister for Heritage  Liberal
Leader of the HouseShane Love MLAManager of Opposition Business Toodyay show gnangarra-2000.jpg   National
John Quigley MLA Attorney General   Labor Nick Goiran MLCShadow Attorney General  Liberal
Minister for Electoral Affairs Mia Davies MLAShadow Minister for Electoral Affairs  National
Paul Papalia MLA Minister for Road Safety   Labor Martin Aldridge MLCShadow Minister for Road Safety  National
Minister for Defence Industry Tjorn Sibma MLC Shadow Minister for Defence Industry  Liberal
Minister for Veterans Issues Colin de Grussa MLCShadow Minister for Veterans Affairs  National
Minister for Police Peter Collier MLCShadow Minister for Police  Liberal
Bill Johnston MLA Minister for Corrective Services   Labor Shadow Minister for Corrective Services
Minister for Energy David Honey MLAShadow Minister for Energy  Liberal
Minister for Mines and Petroleum Shane Love MLAShadow Minister for Mines and Petroleum Toodyay show gnangarra-2000.jpg   National
Rita Saffioti MLA Minister for Transport   Labor Shadow Minister for Transport
Minister for PortsColin de Grussa MLCShadow Minister for Ports  National
Minister for Planning Neil Thomson MLCShadow Minister for Planning  Liberal
Tony Buti MLA Minister for Lands Tony Buti.jpg   Labor Shadow Minister for Lands
Minister for Sport and Recreation Peter Rundle MLAShadow Minister for Sports and Recreation  National
Minister for Citizenship and Multicultural Interests Tjorn Sibma MLCShadow Minister for Citizenship and Multicultural Affairs  Liberal
Minister for Finance Mia Davies MLAShadow Minister for Finance  National
Simone McGurk MLA Minister for Women's Interests 3 Feb 15 FREO FSH gnangarra-120.jpg   Labor Shadow Minister for Women's Interests
Minister for Child Protection Nick Goiran MLCShadow Minister for Child Protection  Liberal
Minister for Prevention of Family and Domestic ViolenceLibby Mettam MLAShadow Minister for Prevention of Family and Domestic Violence  Liberal
Minister for Community Services Donna Faragher MLC Shadow Minister for Community Services
Shadow Minister for Early Childhood Learning
Donna Faragher1.jpg   Liberal
Dave Kelly MLA Minister for Youth Dave Kelly.jpg   Labor Shadow Minister for Youth
Minister for Water James Hayward MLC Shadow Minister for Water  National
Minister for Forestry Steven Martin MLC Shadow Minister for Forestry  Liberal
Amber-Jade Sanderson MLA Minister for the Environment   Labor Tjorn Sibma MLCShadow Minister for Environment  Liberal
Minister for Commerce Vince Catania MLAShadow Minister for Commerce
Shadow Minister for Government Accountability
Vincent Catania.jpg   National
Minister for Climate ActionShane Love MLAShadow Minister for Climate Action Toodyay show gnangarra-2000.jpg   National
John Carey MLA Minister for Housing John Carey MLA speaking at Transition Town Vincent September 2017 cropped.jpg   Labor Steven Martin MLCShadow Minister for Housing  Liberal
Minister for Local Government James Hayward MLCShadow Minister for Local Government
Shadow Minister for Regional Cities
  National
Don Punch MLA Minister for Disability Services   Labor Libby Mettam MLAShadow Minister for Disability Services  Liberal
Minister for Fisheries Colin de Grussa MLCShadow Minister for Fisheries  National
Minister for Innovation and ICTDavid Honey MLAShadow Minister for Innovation and ICT  Liberal
Minister for Seniors and Ageing Donna Faragher MLCShadow Minister for Seniors and Ageing Donna Faragher1.jpg   Liberal
Reece Whitby MLA Minister for Emergency Services
Minister for Volunteering
  Labor Martin Aldridge MLCShadow Minister for Emergency Services
Shadow Minister for Volunteering
Shadow Minister for Regional Communications
  National
Minister for Racing and Gaming Peter Rundle MLAShadow Minister for Racing and Gaming  National
Minister for Small Business Steve Thomas MLCShadow Minister for Small Business  Liberal

See also

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References

  1. "The Western Australian Government Ministry". Premier of Western Australia & Cabinet Ministers. Government of Western Australia. 20 December 2019. Archived from the original on 6 March 2021. Retrieved 4 June 2021.
  2. "Member List". Parliament of Western Australia. Parliament of Western Australia. Archived from the original on 18 March 2021. Retrieved 16 November 2021.