Opposition (Australia)

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In Australian parliamentary practice, the Opposition or Official Opposition consists of the second largest party or coalition of parties in the Australian House of Representatives, with its leader being given the title Leader of the Opposition . The Opposition serves the same function as the official opposition in other Commonwealth of Nations monarchies that follow the Westminster conventions and practices. It is seen as the alternative government and the existing administration's main opponent in the Australian Parliament and at a general election. By convention, the Opposition Leader in the federal Parliament comes from the House of Representatives, as does the deputy, although the Government and Opposition may also both have leaders in the Senate. The Opposition is sometimes styled as Her Majesty's Loyal Opposition [1] to show that, although the group may be against the sitting government, it remains loyal to the Crown (the embodiment of the Australian state), and thus to Australia.

Contents

The current Opposition at a federal level is the centre-left Australian Labor Party, led by Anthony Albanese, Shadow Cabinet of Australia.

State and territory opposition

The Opposition parties and leaders of Australian States and Territories are:

State/territoryOpposition party/coalitionLeader of the OppositionShadow cabinet
Australian Capital Territory Liberal Elizabeth Lee Australian Capital Territory Shadow Cabinet [2]
New South Wales Labor Chris Minns New South Wales Shadow Cabinet
Northern Territory Country Liberal Lia Finocchiaro Northern Territory Shadow Cabinet [3]
Queensland Liberal National David Crisafulli Queensland Shadow Cabinet [4]
South Australia Labor Peter Malinauskas South Australia Shadow Cabinet [5]
Tasmania Labor vacant Tasmania Shadow Cabinet [6]
Victoria Liberal (coalition) Michael O'Brien Victoria Shadow Cabinet [7]
National (coalition)
Western Australia National Mia Davies [8] Western Australia Shadow Cabinet [9]

See also

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References

  1. Maiden, Samantha (18 November 2010). "Altar egos clash over Wills and Babykins". The Australian. Retrieved 31 March 2011.
  2. https://www.parliament.act.gov.au/members/responsibilities
  3. Government, Northern Territory (22 September 2020). "Shadow Ministry - 14th Assembly". parliament.nt.gov.au.
  4. "Shadow Ministers - Queensland Parliament". www.parliament.qld.gov.au.
  5. https://www.parliament.sa.gov.au/en/Members/Shadow-Cabinet
  6. http://www.parliament.tas.gov.au/HA/LaborCab.htm
  7. "List all Current Shadow Ministers". www.parliament.vic.gov.au.
  8. "Member List". www.parliament.wa.gov.au.
  9. "Member List". www.parliament.wa.gov.au.