Order of St Michael and St George

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Most Distinguished Order of Saint Michael and Saint George
Order of Saint Michael and Saint George grand cross collar badge (United Kingdom 1870-1900) - Tallinn Museum of Orders.jpg
Collar and Badge of the Grand Cross
Awarded by
Type Order of chivalry
Established28 April 1818
MottoAuspicium Melioris Ævi
Token of a Better Age
EligibilityTypically British or Commonwealth realm citizens
Awarded for At the monarch's pleasure, though typically awarded for extraordinary non-military service in a foreign country and for services to foreign and commonwealth affairs.
StatusCurrently constituted
Founder Prince George, Prince Regent
Sovereign Queen Elizabeth II
Grand Master Prince Edward, Duke of Kent
Grades
  • Knight/Dame Grand Cross (GCMG)
  • Knight/Dame Commander (KCMG/DCMG)
  • Companion (CMG)
Precedence
Next (higher) Order of the Star of India
Next (lower) Order of the Indian Empire
UK Order St-Michael St-George ribbon.svg
Ribbon bar of the Order of St Michael and St George
Star of a Knight or Dame Commander Medal, order (AM 2018.63.1-2).jpg
Star of a Knight or Dame Commander

The Most Distinguished Order of Saint Michael and Saint George is a British order of chivalry founded on 28 April 1818 by George, Prince Regent, later King George IV, [1] [2] while he was acting as regent for his father, King George III.

Contents

It is named in honour of two military saints, St Michael and St George.

The Order of St Michael and St George was originally awarded to those holding commands or high position in the Mediterranean territories acquired in the Napoleonic Wars, and was subsequently extended to holders of similar office or position in other territories of the British Empire. [2] It is at present awarded to men and women who hold high office or who render extraordinary or important non-military service in a foreign country, and can also be conferred for important or loyal service in relation to foreign and Commonwealth affairs. [2]

Description

The Order includes three classes.

Classes of the Most Distinguished Order of St Michael and St George [1] [2]
GradeKnight Grand CrossDame Grand CrossKnight CommanderDame CommanderCompanion
PrefixSirDameSirDame
Post-nominalsGCMGKCMGDCMGCMG
Insignia Order of St Michael and St George.svg
St George and the Dragon by Mattia Preti (1678) Mattia Preti - St. George Victorious over the Dragon - WGA18398.jpg
St George and the Dragon by Mattia Preti (1678)
Coat of arms of the British monarch as sovereign of the Order of St Michael and St George Royal Coat of Arms of the United Kingdom (Order of St Michael and St George).svg
Coat of arms of the British monarch as sovereign of the Order of St Michael and St George

It is used to honour individuals who have rendered important services in relation to Commonwealth or foreign nations. People are appointed to the Order rather than awarded it. British Ambassadors to foreign nations are regularly appointed as KCMGs or CMGs. For example, the former British Ambassador to the United States, Sir David Manning, was appointed a CMG when he worked for the British Foreign and Commonwealth Office (FCO), and then after his appointment as British Ambassador to the US, he was promoted to a Knight Commander (KCMG). It is the traditional award for members of the FCO.

The Order's motto is Auspicium melioris ævi (Latin for "Token of a better age"). Its patron saints, as the name suggests, are St. Michael the Archangel, and St. George, patron saint of England. One of its primary symbols is that of St Michael trampling over and subduing Satan in battle.

The Order is the sixth-most senior in the British honours system, after The Most Noble Order of the Garter, The Most Ancient and Most Noble Order of the Thistle, The Most Illustrious Order of St Patrick, The Most Honourable Order of the Bath, and The Most Exalted Order of the Star of India. The third of the aforementioned Orders—which relates to Ireland, no longer fully a part of the United Kingdom—still exists but is in disuse; no appointments have been made to it since 1936. The last of the Orders on the list, related to India, has also been in disuse since that country's independence in 1947.

History

The Order's insignia often depict St Michael subduing Satan GuidoReni MichaelDefeatsSatan.jpg
The Order's insignia often depict St Michael subduing Satan

The Prince Regent founded the Order to commemorate the British amical protectorate over the Ionian Islands, which had come under British control in 1814 and had been granted their own constitution as the United States of the Ionian Islands in 1817. It was intended to reward "natives of the Ionian Islands and of the island of Malta and its dependencies, and for such other subjects of His Majesty as may hold high and confidential situations in the Mediterranean". [3]

In 1864, however, the protectorate ended and the Ionian Islands became part of Greece. A revision of the basis of the Order in 1868, saw membership granted to those who "hold high and confidential offices within Her Majesty's colonial possessions, and in reward for services rendered to the Crown in relation to the foreign affairs of the Empire". Accordingly, nowdays, almost all Governors-General and Governors feature as recipients of awards in the order, typically as Knights or Dames Grand Cross.

In 1965 the order was opened to women, [4] with Evelyn Bark becoming the first female CMG in 1967. [5]

Composition

The British Sovereign is the Sovereign of the Order and appoints all other members of the Order (by convention, on the advice of the Government). The next-most senior member is the Grand Master. The office was formerly filled by the Lord High Commissioner of the Ionian Islands; now, however, Grand Masters are chosen by the Sovereign. Grand Masters include:

The Order originally included 15 Knights Grand Cross, 20 Knights Commanders, and 25 Companions but has since been expanded and the current limits on membership are 125, 375, and 1,750 respectively. Members of the Royal Family who are appointed to the Order do not count towards the limit, nor do foreign members appointed as "honorary members".

Officers

The Order has six officers. The Order's King of Arms is not a member of the College of Arms, like many other heraldic officers. The Usher of the Order is known as the Gentleman or Lady Usher of the Blue Rod. Blue Rod does not, unlike the usher of the Order of the Garter, perform any duties related to the House of Lords.

Habit and insignia

Mantle of the Order. GCMG mantle.jpg
Mantle of the Order.
Representation of the star of a Knight or Dame Grand Cross GCMG star.jpg
Representation of the star of a Knight or Dame Grand Cross
Star and badge of a Knight or Dame Commander KCMG Jpegfile.jpg
Star and badge of a Knight or Dame Commander
Collar worn by a Knight or Dame Grand Cross Keten met kleinood van een GCMG.jpg
Collar worn by a Knight or Dame Grand Cross

Members of the Order wear elaborate regalia on important occasions (such as coronations), which vary by rank:

At less important occasions, simpler insignia are used:

On certain "collar days" designated by the Sovereign, members attending formal events may wear the Order's collar over their military uniform or morning wear. When collars are worn (either on collar days or on formal occasions such as coronations), the badge is suspended from the collar. All collars which have been awarded since 1948 must be returned to the Central Chancery of the Orders of Knighthood. The other insignia may be retained.

Chapel

The chapel of the Order of St Michael and St George in St Paul's Cathedral, London. St Paul's Cathedral Chapel of St Michael & St George, London UK - Diliff.jpg
The chapel of the Order of St Michael and St George in St Paul's Cathedral, London.

The original home of the Order was the Palace of St. Michael and St. George in Corfu, the residence of the Lord High Commissioner of the Ionian Islands and the seat of the Ionian Senate. Since 1906, the Order's chapel has been in St Paul's Cathedral in London. (The cathedral also serves as home to the chapels of The Most Excellent Order of the British Empire and the Imperial Society of Knights Bachelor.) Religious services for the whole Order are held quadrennially; new Knights and Dames Grand Cross are installed at these services.

The Sovereign and the Knights and Dames Grand Cross are allotted stalls in the choir of the chapel, above which their heraldic devices are displayed. Perched on the pinnacle of a knight's stall is his helm, decorated with a mantling and topped by his crest. Under English heraldic law, women other than monarchs do not bear helms or crests; instead, the coronet appropriate to the dame's rank, if there is one, is used. Above the crest or coronet, the stall's occupant's heraldic banner is hung, emblazoned with his or her coat of arms. At a considerably smaller scale, to the back of the stall is affixed a piece of brass (a "stall plate") displaying its occupant's name, arms and date of admission into the Order. Upon the death of a Knight, the banner, helm, mantling and crest are taken down. The stall plates, however, are not removed; rather, they remain permanently affixed somewhere about the stall, so that the stalls of the chapel are festooned with a colourful record of the Order's Knights and Dames Grand Cross since 1906.

The reredos within the chapel was commissioned from Henry Poole in 1927. [11]

Precedence and privileges

Members of the Order of St Michael are assigned positions in the order of precedence in England and Wales. Wives of male members also feature on the order of precedence, as do sons, daughters and daughters-in-law of Knights Grand Cross and Knights Commanders; relatives of female members, however, are not assigned any special precedence. (Individuals can derive precedence from their fathers or husbands, but not from their mothers or wives. This follows the general rule of honors, that a husband never derives any style or title from his wife.)

Knights Grand Cross and Knights Commanders prefix "Sir", and Dames Grand Cross and Dames Commanders prefix "Dame", to their forenames. Wives of Knights may prefix "Lady" to their surnames, but husbands of Dames derive no title from their wives. Such forms are not used by peers and princes, except when the names of the former are written out in their fullest forms. Furthermore, honorary (foreign) members and clergymen do not receive the accolade and thus are not entitled to use the prefix "Sir" or "Dame". Knights and Dames Grand Cross use the post-nominal "GCMG"; Knights Commanders and Dames Commanders use "KCMG" and "DCMG" respectively; Companions use "CMG".

Knights and Dames Grand Cross are also entitled to receive heraldic supporters. They may, furthermore, encircle their arms with a depiction of the circlet (a circle bearing the motto) and the collar; the former is shown either outside or on top of the latter. Knights and Dames Commanders and Companions may display the circlet, but not the collar, surrounding their arms. The badge is depicted suspended from the collar or circlet.

In the satirical British television programme Yes Minister , Jim Hacker MP is told an old joke [12] by his Private Secretary Bernard Woolley about what the various post-nominals stand for. From Season 2, Episode 2 "Doing the Honours":

Woolley: In the [civil] service, CMG stands for "Call Me God". And KCMG for "Kindly Call Me God".
Hacker: What does GCMG stand for?
Woolley (deadpan): "God Calls Me God".

Both sexes use the same post-nominal initials, except that there is a distinctly female form of Knight Commander of St Michael and St George. This is Dame Commander of St. Michael and St George (DCMG). In the above joke, DCMG could be said to stand for “Do Call Me God”.

Ian Fleming's spy, James Bond, a commander in the Royal Navy Volunteer Reserve (RNVR) was fictionally decorated with the CMG in 1953. (This is mentioned in the novels From Russia, with Love and On Her Majesty's Secret Service , and on-screen in his obituary in Skyfall .) He was offered the KCMG (which would have elevated him from Companion to Knight Commander in the Order) in The Man with the Golden Gun , but he rejected the offer as he did not wish to become a public figure. Dame Judi Dench's character "M" is "offered" early retirement and a GCMG in Skyfall.

Long-time Doctor Who companion Brigadier Lethbridge-Stewart wore the ribbon of the order as the highest of his decorations in the series' classic era.

Current Knights and Dames Grand Cross

Knights and Dames Grand Cross

NumberNamePost-nominalsKnown forYear
appointed
1 Flag of Zanzibar.svg Sayyid Sir Jamshid bin Abdullah of Zanzibar GCMG Sultan of Zanzibar 1963
2Royal Standard of Prince Edward, Duke of Kent.svg The Duke of Kent KG GCMG GCVO Royal family1967
3 Flag of the United Kingdom.svg Sir Crispin Tickell GCMG KCVO British diplomat1989
4 Flag of Guyana.svg Sir Shridath Ramphal GCMG AC ONZ OE OM OCC QC Commonwealth Secretary-General 1990
5 Flag of New Zealand.svg Dame Catherine Tizard ONZ GCMG GCVO DBE QSO Governor-General of New Zealand 1990
6 Flag of the United Kingdom.svg The Lord Wilson of Tillyorn KT GCMG Governor of Hong Kong 1991
7 Flag of Papua New Guinea.svg Sir Wiwa Korowi GCMG Governor-General of Papua New Guinea 1992
8 Flag of Antigua and Barbuda.svg Sir James Carlisle GCMG Governor-General of Antigua and Barbuda 1993
9 Flag of the United Kingdom.svg Sir Rodric Braithwaite GCMG British diplomat1994
10 Flag of Papua New Guinea.svg Sir Julius Chan GCL GCMG KBE Prime Minister of Papua New Guinea 1994
11 Flag of Belize.svg Sir Colville Young GCMG MBE Governor-General of Belize 1994
12 Flag of the United Kingdom.svg The Lord Hannay of Chiswick GCMG CH British diplomat1995
13 Flag of the Bahamas.svg Sir Orville Turnquest GCMG QC Governor-General of the Bahamas 1995
14 Flag of New Zealand.svg Sir Michael Hardie Boys GNZM GCMG QSO Governor-General of New Zealand 1996
15 Flag of the United Kingdom.svg Sir Christopher Mallaby GCMG GCVO British diplomat1996
16 Flag of Tuvalu.svg Sir Tulaga Manuella GCMG Governor-General of Tuvalu 1996
17 Flag of Grenada.svg Sir Daniel Williams GCMG Governor-General of Grenada 1996
18 Flag of the United Kingdom.svg Sir John Coles GCMG British diplomat1997
19 Flag of the Solomon Islands.svg Sir John Lapli GCMG Governor-General of the Solomon Islands 1999
20 Flag of Saint Lucia.svg Dame Pearlette Louisy GCMG Governor-General of Saint Lucia 1999
21 Flag of the United Kingdom.svg Sir Andrew Wood GCMG British diplomat2001
22 Flag of the United Kingdom.svg Sir John Goulden GCMG British diplomat2001
23 Flag of the United Kingdom.svg The Lord Kerr of Kinlochard GCMG British diplomat2001
24 Flag of Tuvalu.svg Sir Tomasi Puapua GCMG KBE PC Governor-General of Tuvalu 2002
25 Flag of the United Kingdom.svg Sir David Wright GCMG LVO British diplomat2002
26 Flag of the United Kingdom.svg Sir Jeremy Greenstock GCMG British diplomat2003
27 Flag of the United Kingdom.svg Sir Rob Young GCMG British diplomat2003
28 Flag of the United Kingdom.svg The Lord Robertson of Port Ellen KT GCMG PC Secretary General of NATO 2004
29 Flag of the United Kingdom.svg Sir Stephen Wall GCMG LVO British diplomat2004
30 Flag of Papua New Guinea.svg Sir Paulias Matane GCL GCMG OBE Governor-General of Papua New Guinea 2005
31 Flag of the Solomon Islands.svg Sir Nathaniel Waena GCMG CSI KStJ Governor-General of Solomon Islands 2005
32 Flag of the United Kingdom.svg The Lord Jay of Ewelme GCMG British diplomat2006
33 Flag of the United Kingdom.svg Sir Emyr Jones Parry GCMG British diplomat2007
34 Flag of Jamaica.svg Sir Kenneth O. Hall GCMG OJ Governor-General of Jamaica 2007
35 Flag of Antigua and Barbuda.svg Dame Louise Lake-Tack GCMG Governor-General of Antigua and Barbuda 2007
36 Flag of the United Kingdom.svg Sir David Manning GCMG KCVO British diplomat2008
37 Flag of Grenada.svg Sir Carlyle Glean GCMG Governor-General of Grenada 2008
38 Flag of Jamaica.svg Sir Patrick Allen ON GCMG CD Governor-General of Jamaica 2009
39 Flag of the Solomon Islands.svg Sir Frank Kabui GCMG OBE CSI Governor-General of Solomon Islands 2009
40 Flag of the Bahamas.svg Sir Arthur Foulkes GCMG Governor-General of the Bahamas 2010
41 Flag of Tuvalu.svg Sir Iakoba Italeli GCMG Governor-General of Tuvalu 2010
42 Flag of the United Kingdom.svg The Lord Ricketts GCMG GCVO British diplomat2011
43 Flag of the United Kingdom.svg Sir Nigel Sheinwald GCMG British diplomat2011
44 Flag of Barbados.svg Sir Elliott Belgrave GCMG QC Governor-General of Barbados 2012
45 Flag of Grenada.svg Dame Cécile La Grenade GCMG OBE Governor-General of Grenada 2013
46 Flag of Saint Kitts and Nevis.svg Sir Edmund Lawrence GCMG OBE Governor-General of Saint Kitts and Nevis 2013
47 Flag of the Bahamas.svg Dame Marguerite Pindling GCMG Governor-General of the Bahamas 2014
48 Flag of Antigua and Barbuda.svg Sir Rodney Williams GCMG Governor-General of Antigua and Barbuda 2014
49 Flag of the United Kingdom.svg The Baroness Ashton of Upholland GCMG PC British diplomat2015
50 Flag of the United Kingdom.svg Sir John Sawers GCMG British diplomat2015
51 Flag of Saint Kitts and Nevis.svg Sir Tapley Seaton GCMG CVO QC JP Governor-General of Saint Kitts and Nevis 2015
52 Flag of the United Kingdom.svg Sir Simon Fraser GCMG British diplomat2016
53 Flag of the United Kingdom.svg Sir Peter Westmacott GCMG LVO British diplomat2016
54 Flag of Papua New Guinea.svg Sir Robert Dadae GCMG Governor-General of Papua New Guinea 2017
55 Flag of Barbados.svg Dame Sandra Mason GCMG DA QC Governor-General of Barbados 2017
56 Flag of the United Kingdom.svg Sir Mark Lyall Grant GCMG British diplomat & National Security Adviser2018
57 Flag of Saint Lucia.svg Sir Neville Cenac GCMG Governor-General of Saint Lucia 2018
58 Flag of the Bahamas.svg Sir Cornelius A. Smith GCMG Governor-General of the Bahamas 2019
59 Flag of the Solomon Islands.svg Sir David Vunagi GCMG Governor-General of Solomon Islands 2019
60 Flag of Saint Vincent and the Grenadines.svg Dame Susan Dougan GCMG OBE Governor-General of Saint Vincent and the Grenadines 2020
61 Flag of the United Kingdom.svg Sir David Attenborough OM GCMG CH CVO CBE Television broadcaster and conservationist2020
62 Flag of the United Kingdom.svg Sir Tim Barrow GCMG LVO MBE British diplomat2020
63 Flag of the United Kingdom.svg Sir Julian King GCMG KCVO British diplomat2020
64 Flag of the United Kingdom.svg The Lord McDonald of Salford GCMG KCVO British diplomat2021

Honorary

See List of current honorary Knights and Dames of the Order of St Michael and St George.

See also

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