Daniel Craig

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Daniel Craig
Daniel Craig - Film Premiere "Spectre" 007 - on the Red Carpet in Berlin (22387409720) (cropped).jpg
Craig in October 2015
Born (1968-03-02) 2 March 1968 (age 53)
Chester, England
OccupationActor
Years active1992–present
Spouse(s)
Fiona Loudon
(m. 1992;div. 1994)

(m. 2011)
Children2
Awards Full list
Signature
Firma de Daniel Craig.svg

Daniel Wroughton Craig (born 2 March 1968) is an English actor. He is best known for playing James Bond in the eponymous film series, beginning with Casino Royale (2006), which brought him international fame. [1] [2] As of January 2021, he has starred in three more instalments, with a fifth set to be released in late 2021. Other performances include his breakthrough role in the drama serial Our Friends in the North (1996), the historical drama film Munich (2005), and the mystery thriller The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo (2011) and the mystery comedy Knives Out (2019).

Contents

After training at the National Youth Theatre and graduating from the Guildhall School of Music and Drama in 1991, Craig began his career on stage. He made his film debut in the drama The Power of One (1992) and attracted attention with appearances in the historical television war drama Sharpe's Eagle (1993), and the family film A Kid in King Arthur's Court (1995). After appearing in Our Friends in the North, he gained roles in the biographical film Elizabeth (1998), the action film Lara Croft: Tomb Raider (2001), before appearing in the crime thrillers Road to Perdition (2002) and Layer Cake (2004).

Casino Royale, released in November 2006, was favourably received by critics and earned Craig a nomination for the BAFTA Award for Best Actor in a Leading Role. His starring role in Quantum of Solace (2008), Skyfall (2012), the series' highest-grossing film, Spectre (2015), and No Time to Die (2021), has brought further international attention. He has continued to star in other films, such as the fantasy film The Golden Compass (2007), the historical drama Defiance (2008), the science fiction Western Cowboys & Aliens (2011), the heist film Logan Lucky (2017), and Knives Out (2019). The last earned him a Golden Globe Award nomination for Best Actor – Motion Picture Musical or Comedy.

Early life

Daniel Wroughton Craig was born in Chester on 2 March 1968, the son of Carol Olivia (née Williams), an art teacher, and Timothy John Wroughton Craig (1943–2020), a midshipman in the Merchant Navy and steel erector. His father later became the landlord of two Cheshire pubs: the Ring o' Bells in Frodsham and the Boot Inn in Tarporley. [3] Craig has an older sister named Lea (born 1965). [4] He is of French and Welsh descent, counting the French Huguenot minister Daniel Chamier and Sir William Burnaby, 1st Baronet among his ancestors. His middle name, Wroughton, comes from his great-great-grandmother, Grace Matilda Wroughton. [5]

When Craig's parents divorced in 1972, he and his sister moved to Liverpool with their mother. The family lived on the Wirral Peninsula, where he attended primary school Hoylake as well as school in Frodsham. He attended Hilbre High School in West Kirby. Upon finishing his compulsory secondary school education at the age of 16, he attended Calday Grange Grammar School as a sixth form student. [6] He played rugby union for Hoylake RFC. [7] [4]

Craig began acting in school plays at the age of six, making his debut in the Frodsham Primary School production of Oliver! He became interested in serious acting by attending Liverpool's Everyman Theatre with his mother. At the age of 14, he played roles in Romeo and Juliet and Cinderella at Hilbre High School. At the age of 16, he was accepted into the National Youth Theatre and moved to London, where he worked part-time in restaurants to finance his education. His parents watched his stage debut as Agamemnon in Troilus And Cressida . He performed with the National Youth Theatre on tours to Valencia and Moscow under the leadership of director Edward Wilson. He entered the Guildhall School of Music and Drama in 1988, and graduated in 1991 after a three-year course under the tutelage of Colin McCormack, the actor from the Royal Shakespeare Company. [4]

Career

1992-2005: Early roles and breakthrough

Craig with producer Michael G. Wilson in June 2006 Daniel Craig on Venice yacht crop w Wilson.jpg
Craig with producer Michael G. Wilson in June 2006

Craig appeared in his first screen role in 1992, playing an Afrikaner in The Power of One . [8] Having played minor roles in the miniseries Anglo-Saxon Attitudes and the shows Covington Cross and Boon , he appeared in November 1993 as Joe in the Royal National Theatre's production of Tony Kushner's Angels in America . [9] [10] [11] [12] Also in 1993, Craig was featured in two episodes of the American television shows Zorro and The Young Indiana Jones Chronicles , [13] [14] [15] and British shows Heartbeat , Between the Lines , Drop the Dead Donkey and Sharpe's Eagle . [16] [17] [18] [19] In 1994, Craig appeared in The Rover , a filmed stage production and Les Grandes Horizontales , a stage production at the National Theatre Studio, where he first met Rachel Weisz, who would become his second wife. [20] [21] [22] Craig was featured in the poorly received Disney film A Kid in King Arthur's Court (1995). [23] [24] In 1996, Craig starred in the BBC drama serial Our Friends in the North as the troubled George 'Geordie' Peacock. Appearing alongside Christopher Eccleston, Gina McKee and Mark Strong, Craig's part in the series is considered his breakthrough role. [25] [26]

In the same year, Craig guest-starred in an episode of the HBO horror anthology series Tales from the Crypt and was featured in the BBC television film Saint-Ex . [27] [28] Craig gave a lead performance in the Franco-German drama Obsession in 1997, about a love triangle between Craig's character and a couple. [29] The same year, he played a leading role in Hurlyburly, a play performed in the West End at the Old Vic. [30]

Craig appeared in three films in 1998: the independent drama Love and Rage , [31] the biographical drama Elizabeth , in which he played Jesuit priest John Ballard, who was executed for being involved in an attempt to assassinate Queen Elizabeth I of England in the Babington Plot, [21] [32] and the BBC television film Love Is the Devil: Study for a Portrait of Francis Bacon (1998), in which Craig played small-time thief George Dyer who becomes the lover and muse of painter Francis Bacon, who was portrayed by Derek Jacobi. [33] The following year, Craig starred in a television drama called Shockers: The Visitor and as Sergeant Telford Winter in the independent war film The Trench , which takes place in the confines of the trenches in the First World War during the 48 hours leading up to the Battle of the Somme. [34] [35]

Craig played a schizophrenic man who falls in with a woman (played Kelly Macdonald) after being discharged from psychiatric hospital in the drama Some Voices (2000). [36] [37] Also in 2000, Craig co-starred alongside Toni Collette in the dark comedy Hotel Splendide and was featured in I Dreamed of Africa , based on the life of Kuki Gallmann (played by Kim Basinger). [38] [39] Craig played the love interest of Angelina Jolie's character Lara Croft in Lara Croft: Tomb Raider (2001), based on the video game series Tomb Raider . [40] He later admitted to having taken on the role in the poorly-reviewed yet commercially successful film only for the paycheque. [41] In 2001, Craig also starred in the four-part Channel 4 drama Sword of Honour , based on the trilogy of novels of the same. [42] Craig appeared in the anthology film Ten Minutes Older: The Cello (2002), starring in the segment "Addicted to the Stars", directed by Michael Radford. [43] [44]

His second release of 2002 was Sam Mendes' crime film Road to Perdition with Tom Hanks and Paul Newman, in which he played Irish mobster Connor Rooney, the son of the crime organisation's boss. [45] [46] Craig then portrayed German theoretical physicist Werner Heisenberg in the BBC television drama Copenhagen (2002), which depicts Heisenberg's involvement in the German nuclear weapon project during World War II. [47] [48] On stage, Craig starred opposite Michael Gambon in the original production of Caryl Churchill's play A Number from September to November 2002 at the Royal Court Theatre. [49] [50] Craig received a London Evening Standard Theatre Award for Best Actor nomination for his role as a man who is cloned twice by his father. [51] The next year, he starred as poet Ted Hughes opposite Gwyneth Paltrow as Sylvia Plath in the biographical film Sylvia (2003), which depicts the romance between the two poets. [52] In the same year, he appeared in The Mother as a man who engages in an affair with the much older mother (played by Anne Reid) of his lover and best friend. [53] [54]

The crime thriller Layer Cake , directed by Matthew Vaughn, starred Craig as a London-based cocaine supplier known only as XXXX. [55] Kevin Crust, writing for the Los Angeles Times , praised Craig's "stunningly suave performance", while Roger Ebert thought he was "fascinating" in the film. [56] [57] Craig next starred as a man who becomes dangerously close with a stranger (played by Rhys Ifans) after witnessing a deadly accident together in Enduring Love (2004). [58] [59]

Craig appeared in three theatrical films in 2005, all of which were supporting roles. His first release of the year, was the thriller The Jacket starring Adrien Brody and Keira Knightley. [60] [61] He then made a brief appearance in the Hungarian film Fateless as a United States Army Sergeant who takes a liking to a teenage boy who survives life in concentration camps. [62] [63] Craig's third and final role of the year was in Munich , directed by Steven Spielberg, as a South African driver who is a part of a covert Israeli government assassination mission against eleven Palestinians allegedly involved in the Munich massacre at the 1972 Summer Olympics. [64] [65] Also in 2005, Craig starred in the BBC television film Archangel – based on Robert Harris' eponymous novel – as an English academic who stumbles upon a notebook believed to have belonged to Joseph Stalin. [66] [67]

2006–present: James Bond and worldwide recognition

Craig at the Quantum of Solace film premiere in New York in November 2008 Daniel Craig at a film premiere in New York.jpg
Craig at the Quantum of Solace film premiere in New York in November 2008

In 2005, Craig was contacted by Eon Productions to portray James Bond. Initially, he was unsure about the role when first offered it and was resistant to the producers' overtures. "There was a period of trying to woo him" longtime Bond co-producer Barbara Broccoli later commented in 2012. [68] During this period, he sought advice from colleagues and friends, of whom "most of us said to him...'there is life after Bond'.". [69] He stated he "was aware of the challenges" of the Bond franchise, which he considered "a big machine that makes a lot of money". He aimed at bringing more "emotional depth" to the character. [70] Born in 1968, Craig is the first actor to portray James Bond to have been born after the Bond series started and after the death of Ian Fleming, the novels' writer. The casting choice caused significant controversy. Throughout the entire production period, internet campaigns expressed their dissatisfaction and threatened to boycott the film in protest. [71] Craig, blond and 5 feet 10 inches (1.78 m), was not considered by some protesters to fit the tall, dark-haired Bond portrayed by the previous Bond actors, to which viewers had apparently become accustomed. [72] Although the choice of Craig was controversial, numerous actors publicly voiced their support. Most notably four of the five actors who had previously portrayed Bond Sean Connery, Roger Moore, Pierce Brosnan and Timothy Dalton  – called his casting a good decision. [73] [74] Connery notably shared his thoughts on Craig's casting as Bond in 2008, describing him as "fantastic, marvelous in the part". The other actor to have previously played Bond, George Lazenby, has since voiced his approval of Craig also. [75] Clive Owen, who had been linked to the role, also spoke in defence of Craig. [76]

The first film, Casino Royale , premiered on 14 November 2006, and grossed US$594,239,066 worldwide, which made it the highest-grossing Bond film until the release of Skyfall. [77] After the film was released, Craig's performance garnered critical acclaim. [78] [79] Craig lent his voice and likeness as James Bond for both the Wii game GoldenEye 007 , an enhanced remake of the 1997 game for the Nintendo 64, and James Bond 007: Blood Stone . [80] In addition to Casino Royale, Craig also appeared in two more films in 2006: the drama Infamous as mass murderer Perry Edward Smith and as the voice of the lead character in the English-language version of the French animated film Renaissance . [81] [82] [83] In 2006, Craig was invited to join the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences. [84]

Craig starred opposite Nicole Kidman in the science fiction horror film The Invasion in 2007, the fourth film adaptation of the novel The Body Snatchers by Jack Finney, which was met with a negative reception. [85] He portrayed Lord Asriel in The Golden Compass , the 2007 film adaptation of Philip Pullman's novel. [86] [87] In March 2007, Craig made a cameo appearance as himself in a sketch with Catherine Tate who appeared in the guise of her character Elaine Figgis from The Catherine Tate Show . The sketch was made for the BBC Red Nose Day 2007 fundraising programme. [88] In 2008, in addition to Quantum of Solace and its accompanying video game, Craig starred in the drama Flashbacks of a Fool alongside Emilia Fox, as a washed-up Hollywood actor who reflects on his life; although the film was received negatively, Craig's performance was praised. [89] [90] In his final release of 2008, the war film Defiance , Craig starred as Tuvia Bielski, the leader of the Bielski partisans, fighting in the forests of Belarus during World War II, saving 1,200 people. [91]

Wax statue of Craig as James Bond at Madame Tussauds in London James Bond (Daniel Craig) figure at Madame Tussauds London (30318318754).jpg
Wax statue of Craig as James Bond at Madame Tussauds in London

He co-starred with Hugh Jackman in a limited engagement of the drama A Steady Rain , on Broadway, which played in autumn 2009 at the Schoenfeld Theatre, for which he gained positive reviews. [92] [93] In August 2010, Craig starred as crusading journalist Mikael Blomkvist in David Fincher's 2011 adaptation of Stieg Larsson's novel The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo . [94] [95] The next year, he took up a leading role in Dream House , a psychological thriller directed by Jim Sheridan and co-starring Rachel Weisz, Naomi Watts and Marton Csokas. [96] It garnered mostly negative reviews and low box office results. Craig then co-starred with Harrison Ford and Olivia Wilde in Cowboys & Aliens , an American science fiction Western film, based on Scott Mitchell Rosenberg's 2006 graphic novel of the same name. [97] [98] The same year, Craig provided his voice to Steven Spielberg's animated film The Adventures of Tintin in 2011, playing the villainous pirate Ivan Ivanovitch Sakharine and his ancestor Red Rackham in a dual role. [99] [100]

The planned 19 April 2010 release of Craig's third Bond film was delayed, because of financial troubles; the film, titled Skyfall , was eventually released on 23 October 2012. [101] [102] [103] The same year, he appeared as James Bond in the short film Happy and Glorious, in which he escorted Queen Elizabeth II to the 2012 Summer Olympics opening ceremony. [104] [105] He and his wife Weisz starred in a Broadway play titled Betrayal , which ran from October 2013 to January 2014. [106] [107] Despite mixed reviews, it grossed $17.5 million, becoming the second highest earning Broadway play of 2013. [108] Craig's fourth Bond film, Spectre , began filming in December 2014 and was released on 26 October 2015. His four Bond films have grossed $3.5 billion globally, after adjusting for inflation. [109]

Prior to the inaugural Invictus Games held in London in September 2014, Craig along with other entertainers and athletes read the poem "Invictus" in a promotional video. [110] He made an uncredited cameo appearance as a stormtrooper in the 2015 film Star Wars: The Force Awakens . [111] [112] Craig appeared in a modern production of William Shakespeare's tragedy Othello at the Off-Broadway New York Theatre Workshop throughout late 2016 and early 2017. The production starred David Oyelowo as the titular character and Craig as the main antagonist, Iago. [113] Diane Snyder of The Daily Telegraph praised his "chilling" portrayal of Iago in the play. [113] In 2017, Craig co-starred in Steven Soderbergh's comedy Logan Lucky , about two brothers who pull off a heist during a NASCAR race. [114] [115] Craig starred alongside Halle Berry in the drama Kings set during the 1992 Los Angeles riots. The film premiered in September 2017 and was distributed by The Orchard the following year; it was harshly reviewed by many film critics. [116]

In 2019, Craig starred in Rian Johnson's black comedy murder-mystery Knives Out , as a detective investigating the sudden death of a family patriarch. [117] The film premiered at the 2019 Toronto International Film Festival to critical acclaim, and was theatrically released that November. [118] [119] [120]

His fifth Bond film No Time to Die was to be directed by Danny Boyle and released in November 2019, but its release date was delayed after Boyle left the project. [121] It was ultimately directed by Cary Joji Fukunaga and is scheduled for release in October 2021, having been delayed several times due to the COVID-19 pandemic. [122] [123] In an appearance on The Late Show with Stephen Colbert , Craig confirmed that No Time to Die would be his last James Bond film. [124]

Charity and humanitarian work

In 2007, Craig and British Prime Minister Tony Blair took part in the United Kingdom's Comic Relief charity fundraiser, ultimately raising more than USD $90 million. Craig made a cameo appearance as himself in a sketch with Catherine Tate who appeared in the guise of her character Elaine Figgis from The Catherine Tate Show , for the BBC Red Nose Day 2007 fundraising programme. [125] Craig participated in the Broadway Cares/Equity Fights AIDS fundraising 8 December 2009, raising $1,549,953 in the 21st annual Gypsy of the Year competition, from six weeks of curtain appeals at their hit Broadway drama, A Steady Rain. [126] Craig starred in 2011 in a short film narrated by Judi Dench, which was produced for International Woman's Day. [127] The next year, Craig worked with Orbis International in Mongolia to raise support and awareness of the Orbis medical team and their Flying Eye Hospital. [128]

He is involved with multiple charities including S.A.F.E. Kenya, which uses street theatre to address social issues. [129] He is also involved with the Opportunity Network, which provides access to education for low-income students in New York. [130] In 2011, he collaborated with Dame Judi Dench to highlight gender inequality for International Women's Day. [131] In August 2014, he added his name to a letter to British broadcasters calling for better representation of ethnic minorities. [132] In 2015, Craig appeared in the film Comic Relief: Behind the Bond for the BBC Red Nose Day 2015 fundraising programme. [133]  

In April 2015, the United Nations appointed Craig the first global advocate for the elimination of mines and explosive hazards. [134] The role involves raising awareness for the UN Mine Action Service (UNMAS), and political and financial support for the cause. Former UN Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon told Craig: "You have been given a licence to kill, I'm now giving you a licence to save." [134] In 2019, Craig appeared in a video with the Secretary-General of the United Nations, António Guterres, and launched the UNMAS Safe Ground campaign to turn minefields into playing fields. [135]

Personal life

In 1992, Craig married actress Fiona Loudon; they had a daughter named Ella before divorcing in 1994. [136] [137] He later began a relationship with German actress Heike Makatsch, which lasted for seven years before ending in 2004. [136] He subsequently dated and was engaged to film producer Satsuki Mitchell from 2005 until 2010. [138] [136] Craig and actress Rachel Weisz had known each other since working together on Les Grandes Horizontales (1994). They began dating in December 2010, and were married in a private ceremony in New York City on 22 June 2011 with only four guests in attendance, including Craig's daughter and Weisz's son. [139] [140] It was reported on 1 September 2018 that their first child together, a daughter, had been born. [141]

Craig had been vocal about his opposition to Brexit before the 2016 EU membership referendum. In 2016, he was pictured wearing a "Vote Remain" t-shirt which was adorned with the words, "No man is an island. No country by itself." [142] In January 2018, Craig purchased a house in Brooklyn, New York, for an amount in excess of $6 million. [143] He is an avid fan of Liverpool F.C., and is also a fan of rugby, having travelled to Australia in 2013 to watch the British and Irish Lions tour. [144]

Filmography

Films

Key
Dagger-14-plain.pngDenotes films that have not yet been released
YearTitleRoleNotes
1992 The Power of One Sergeant Jaapie Botha
1995 A Kid in King Arthur's Court Master Kane
1997 Obsession John McHale
1998 Love and Rage James Lynchehaun
Elizabeth John Ballard
1999 The Trench Sergeant Telford Winter
2000 Some Voices Ray
Hotel Splendide Ronald Blanche
I Dreamed of Africa Declan Fielding
2001 Lara Croft: Tomb Raider Alex West
2002 Ten Minutes Older: The Cello Cecil Thomas
Road to Perdition Connor Rooney
Occasional, StrongJimshort film
2003 Sylvia Ted Hughes
The Mother Darren
2004 Layer Cake XXXX
Enduring Love Joe
2005 The Jacket Rudy Mackenzie
Fateless American Soldier
Munich Steve
2006 Renaissance Barthélémy Karasvoice
Infamous Perry Smith
Casino Royale James Bond
2007 The Invasion Ben Driscoll
The Golden Compass Lord Asriel
2008 Flashbacks of a Fool Joe ScotExecutive producer
Quantum of Solace James Bond
Defiance Tuvia Bielski
How to Lose Friends & Alienate People
2011 One Life NarratorDocumentary
Cowboys & Aliens Jake Lonergan
Dream House Will Atenton / Peter Ward
The Adventures of Tintin Ivan Ivanovitch Sakharine / Red Rackham motion capture
The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo Mikael Blomkvist
The Organ Grinder's MonkeyBubblesShort film
2012 Happy & Glorious James BondShort film
Skyfall
2015 Spectre Co-producer
Star Wars: The Force Awakens Stormtrooper FN-1824[ citation needed ]Uncredited cameo
2017 Logan Lucky Joe Bang
Kings Obie Hardison
2019 Knives Out Detective Benoit Blanc
2021 No Time to Die Dagger-14-plain.pngJames BondCo-producer

Television

YearTitleRoleNotes
1992Anglo-Saxon AttitudesGilbert Stokesay3 episodes
Boon Jim Parham1 episode
Covington Cross Walkway guard1 episode
1993 Zorro Lieutenant Hidalgo2 episodes
Drop the Dead Donkey FixxEpisode: "George and His Daughter"
The Young Indiana Jones Chronicles SchillerEpisode: "Palestine, October 1917"
Between the Lines Joe RanceEpisode: "New Order"
Heartbeat Peter BeggEpisode: "A Chilly Reception"
Screen Two Lt. GuthEpisode: "Genghis Cohn"
Sharpe's Eagle Lt. BerryTelevision film
1996 Our Friends in the North Geordie Peacock8 episodes
Tales from the Crypt BarryEpisode: "Smoke Wrings"
Saint-Ex GuillaumetTelevision film
Kiss and TellMatt Kearney
The Fortunes and Misfortunes of Moll Flanders James "Jemmy" Seagrave
1997 The Hunger Jerry PritchardEpisode: "Ménage à Trois"
The Ice House DS Andy McLoughlinTelevision film
1998 Love Is the Devil: Study for a Portrait of Francis Bacon George Dyer
1999Shockers: The VisitorRichard
2001 Sword of Honour Guy Crouchback
2002 Copenhagen Werner Heisenberg
2005 Archangel Prof. Fluke Kelso
2006 Fifth Gear Himself
2012 Saturday Night Live Himself (host)Episode: "Daniel Craig/Muse"
2014 Superheroes Unite for BBC Children in Need Narrator (voice)Television film
2017 Comrade Detective Father Anton Streza (voice)2 episodes
2020 Saturday Night Live Himself (host)Episode: "Daniel Craig/the Weeknd"

Theatre

YearTitleRoleTheatre
1993 Angels in America Joe Pitt Royal National Theatre
1994 The Rover (play and film)BluntWomen's Playhouse Trust and BBC
Les Grandes Horizontales National Theatre Studio
1997 Hurlyburly Mickey The Old Vic
2002 A Number Bernard 1
Bernard 2
Michael Black
Royal Court
2009 A Steady Rain Joey Gerald Schoenfeld Theatre
2013 Betrayal Robert Ethel Barrymore Theatre
2016 Othello Iago New York Theatre Workshop

Video games

YearTitleVoice role
2008 007: Quantum of Solace James Bond
2010 GoldenEye 007
James Bond 007: Blood Stone
2015 James Bond: World of Espionage

Commercials

YearTitleRole
2012 Heineken Crack the Case [145] James Bond
2012 Sony Mouse & Cat [146] [147]
2015 Heineken The Chase
2020 Heineken Daniel Craig vs James Bond James Bond/Himself

Awards and nominations

See also

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Skyfall is a 2012 spy film and the twenty-third in the James Bond series produced by Eon Productions. The film is the third to star Daniel Craig as fictional MI6 agent James Bond and features Javier Bardem as Raoul Silva, the villain, and Judi Dench as M. It was directed by Sam Mendes and written by Neal Purvis, Robert Wade, and John Logan, and features the theme song "Skyfall", written and performed by Adele. It was theatrically distributed by Sony Pictures Releasing. The story centres on Bond investigating an attack on MI6 that leads to a wider plot by former agent Raoul Silva to discredit and kill M as revenge for abandoning him. It sees the return of two recurring characters after an absence of two films: Q, played by Ben Whishaw, and Miss Moneypenny, played by Naomie Harris.

<i>No Time to Die</i> 25th film in the James Bond film franchise

No Time to Die is a forthcoming spy film and the 25th instalment in the James Bond film series produced by Eon Productions. It stars Daniel Craig in his fifth outing as the fictional British MI6 agent James Bond. Craig has said it will be his final Bond film. It is directed by Cary Joji Fukunaga from a screenplay by Neal Purvis, Robert Wade, Fukunaga, and Phoebe Waller-Bridge. Léa Seydoux, Ben Whishaw, Naomie Harris, Jeffrey Wright, Christoph Waltz, Rory Kinnear, and Ralph Fiennes reprise their roles from previous films, with Rami Malek, Lashana Lynch, Ana de Armas, Dali Benssalah, Billy Magnussen, and David Dencik joining the cast as new characters.

<i>Spectre</i> (2015 film) 2015 film by Sam Mendes

Spectre is a 2015 spy film and the twenty-fourth in the James Bond series produced by Eon Productions for Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer and Columbia Pictures. It is the fourth film to feature Daniel Craig as the fictional MI6 agent James Bond, and the second film in the series directed by Sam Mendes following Skyfall. It was written by John Logan, Neal Purvis, Robert Wade, and Jez Butterworth. It is the final James Bond film to be distributed theatrically by Sony Pictures Releasing through its Columbia Pictures label, as Universal Pictures will internationally distribute the next film in the series, No Time to Die.

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Further reading