Reaching for the Moon (1930 film)

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Reaching for the Moon
Reaching for the Moon FilmPoster.jpeg
Directed by Edmund Goulding
Screenplay byEdmund Goulding
Story by Irving Berlin
Produced by Joseph M. Schenck
Douglas Fairbanks
Starring Douglas Fairbanks
Bebe Daniels
Edward Everett Horton
Cinematography Ray June
Robert H. Planck
Edited by Hal C. Kern
Lloyd Nosler
Music by Alfred Newman
Production
company
Distributed by United Artists
Release date
  • December 29, 1930 (1930-12-29)
Running time
91 minutes
CountryUnited States
LanguageEnglish

Reaching for the Moon is a 1930 American pre-Code black and white musical film. Originally released at 91 minutes; surviving versions are usually cut to 62 minutes. A 74-minute version aired in 1998 on USA cable channel AMC. The DVD version runs just under 72 minutes. The film's working title was Lucky Break and is known as Para alcanzar la Luna in Spain. It is not to be confused with the Fairbanks silent film Reaching for the Moon (1917).

Contents

Background

The film was originally intended to be a musical with songs written by Irving Berlin but problems soon developed. From the start, Berlin found Edmund Goulding, the director, difficult to work with. Also by mid-1930 the studio realized that the public's demand for musicals had disappeared. So Goulding jettisoned many of Berlin's songs from the score. Although just five Berlin songs had been recorded, the film, even in its scaled-down form, proved very expensive to make. By the time the filming was complete, the costs had come to about a million dollars, a huge budget for the times, and one that virtually ruled out the possibility of the film returning a profit. [1]

The one song that was retained was "When the Folks High Up Do the Mean Low Down" introduced by Bing Crosby who had filmed it late at night after completing his work at the Cocoanut Grove. [2] Variety commented on this song specifically, saying: "None of the Berlin songs is left other than a chorus of hot numbers apparently named "Lower Than Lowdown" [sic]. Tune suddenly breaks into the running in the ship's bar when Bing Crosby, of the Whiteman Rhythm Boys, gives it a strong start for just a chorus which, in turn, is ably picked up by Miss Daniels, also for merely a chorus, and then in an exterior shot to the deck where June MacCloy sends the lyric and melody for a gallop of half a chorus. [3]

Plot

Wall Street wizard, Larry Day, new to the ways of love, is coached by his valet. He follows Vivian Benton on an ocean liner, where cocktails, laced with a "love potion", work their magic. He then loses his fortune in the market crash and feels he has also lost his girl.

Cast

Soundtrack

Written by Irving Berlin
Sung by Bing Crosby, Bebe Daniels, June MacCloy and chorus.
Written by Irving Berlin
(heard instrumentally over the opening credits, as background music for a love scene, then briefly at the end)

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References

  1. Bergreen, Laurence (1990). As Thousands Cheer. London: Hodder and Stoughton. pp. 291–293. ISBN   0-340-53486-9.
  2. Giddins, Gary (2001). A Pocketful of Dreams . New York: Little, Brown and Company. p. 233. ISBN   0-316-88188-0.
  3. "Variety". Variety. January 7, 1931.