Ronnie Scott's Jazz Club

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Coordinates: 51°30′48″N0°07′54″W / 51.51346°N 0.13155°W / 51.51346; -0.13155

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Ronnie Scott's Jazz Club
Ronnie Scott's Jazz Club logo.jpeg
Logo of Ronnie Scott's Jazz Club
Ronnie Scott's-5469148 e540293d.jpg
47 Frith Street
Address47 Frith Street
Location Soho, London, United Kingdom
Type Jazz club
Opened1959
Website
ronniescotts.co.uk

Ronnie Scott's Jazz Club is a jazz club that has operated in Soho, London, since 1959.

History

The club opened on 30 October 1959 in a basement at 39 Gerrard Street in London's Soho district. It was set up and managed by musicians Ronnie Scott and Pete King. In 1965 it moved to a larger venue nearby at 47 Frith Street. The original venue continued in operation as the "Old Place" until the lease ran out in 1967, and was used for performances by the up-and-coming generation of musicians.

Zoot Sims was the club's first transatlantic visitor in 1962, and was succeeded by many others (often saxophonists whom Scott and King, tenor saxophonists themselves, admired, such as Johnny Griffin, Lee Konitz, Sonny Rollins and Sonny Stitt) in the years that followed. Many UK jazz musicians were also regularly featured, including Tubby Hayes and Dick Morrissey who would both drop in for jam sessions with the visiting stars. In the mid-1960s, Ernest Ranglin was the house guitarist. The club's house pianist until 1967 was Stan Tracey. For nearly 30 years it was home of a Christmas residency to George Melly and John Chilton's Feetwarmers. In 1978, the club established the label Ronnie Scott's Jazz House, which issued both live performances from the club and new recordings.

Scott regularly acted as the club's Master of Ceremonies, and was known for his repertoire of jokes, asides and one-liners. After Scott's death in 1996, King continued to run the club for a further nine years, before selling the club to theatre impresario Sally Greene and philanthropist Michael Watt in June 2005.

In 2009, Ronnie Scott's was named by the Brecon Jazz Festival as one of 12 venues that had made the most important contributions to jazz in the United Kingdom, [1] and finished third in the voting for the initial award. [2]

Jimi Hendrix's last public performance was at Ronnie Scott's, in 1970. [3]

House musicians

Club interior Ronnie Scotts Jazz Club, Frith Street, Soho, London (geograph 4001868).jpg
Club interior

Many of the visiting musicians appearing at Ronnie Scott's were soloists touring without their own rhythm section, or were touring as members of larger bands and they often used the house band to accompany them. On occasions, the house musicians coincided with the members of the various bands that Ronnie Scott led at one time or another.

Drums

backing visiting Americans such as Stan Getz, Art Farmer and Roland Kirk [5]
Accompanied Joe Henderson, Lee Konitz, Charlie Mariano, Stan Getz, Sonny Rollins and Bill Evans.

Keyboards

Accompanied Chet Baker, George Coleman, James Moody, Joe Henderson and Johnny Griffin

Bass

Other instruments

Other musicians

Other regular performers since 2006 include:

Record label

In 1978, the club established its own record label, Ronnie Scott's Jazz House. The first release was an album by Scott's quintet. Over the next 20 years, the label gained in prominence, issuing both historic live club performances and new recordings. [6]

Live albums recorded at Ronnie's

See also

Further reading

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References

  1. ""Buckingham Palace hits right note with jazz fans", London Evening Standard (3 August 2009)".
  2. "Most important jazz venue named". 7 August 2009 via news.bbc.co.uk.
  3. "Jimi Hendrix". Songkick. Retrieved 10 December 2015.
  4. David Taylor's British jazz web site Archived 16 February 2009 at the Wayback Machine
  5. "Obituary in The Independent".
  6. Fox, Charles; et al. (2001). "Ronnie Scott". In Root, Deane L. (ed.). The New Grove Dictionary of Music and Musicians . Oxford University Press.