Saloon Bar

Last updated

Saloon Bar
Saloon Bar.jpg
Directed by Walter Forde
Produced byCulley Forde (producer)
Written by John Dighton (writer)
Frank Harvey (play)
Angus MacPhail (writer)
StarringSee below
Music by Ernest Irving
Cinematography Ronald Neame
Edited by Ray Pitt
Release date
  • 1940 (1940)
Running time
99 minutes
CountryUnited Kingdom
LanguageEnglish

Saloon Bar is a 1940 British thriller film directed by Walter Forde. It was made by Ealing Studios and its style has led to comparisons with the later Ealing Comedies, unlike other wartime Ealing films which are different in tone. [1] The action takes place over one evening in the saloon bar of a London pub, just before Christmas. The regulars discuss the forthcoming execution for robbery and murder of the boyfriend of one of the barmaids. A pound note from the robbery is found in the till. Convinced of the condemned man's innocence they trace how the note came to be there and manage to unmask the true killer.

Contents

It is based on the 1939 play of the same name by Frank Harvey in which Harker had also starred. [2]

Premise

An amateur detective tries to clear an innocent man of a crime before the date of his execution. [3]

Cast

Related Research Articles

<i>The Blue Lamp</i> 1950 film by Basil Dearden

The Blue Lamp is a 1950 British police drama directed by Basil Dearden and starring Jack Warner as PC Dixon, Jimmy Hanley as newcomer PC Mitchell, and Dirk Bogarde as criminal Tom Riley. The title refers to the blue lamps that traditionally hung outside British police stations. The film became the inspiration for the 1955–1976 TV series Dixon of Dock Green, where Jack Warner continued to play PC Dixon until he was 80 years old.

The Ealing comedies is an informal name for a series of comedy films produced by the London-based Ealing Studios during the period 1947 to 1957. Hue and Cry (1947) is generally considered to be the earliest of the cycle, and Barnacle Bill (1957) the last, although some sources list Davy (1958) as the final Ealing comedy.

<i>The Man in the White Suit</i> 1951 film by Alexander Mackendrick

The Man In The White Suit is a 1951 British satirical science fiction comedy film made by Ealing Studios. It stars Alec Guinness, Joan Greenwood and Cecil Parker and was directed by Alexander Mackendrick. The film was nominated for an Academy Award for Best Writing (Screenplay) for Roger MacDougall, John Dighton and Alexander Mackendrick.

Gordon Jackson (actor) Scottish actor

Gordon Cameron Jackson, was a Scottish actor best remembered for his roles as the butler Angus Hudson in Upstairs, Downstairs and as George Cowley, the head of CI5, in The Professionals. He also portrayed Flt. Lt. Andrew MacDonald, "Intelligence", in The Great Escape.

<i>Trouble Brewing</i> (1939 film)

Trouble Brewing is a 1939 British comedy film directed by Anthony Kimmins and starring George Formby, Googie Withers and Gus McNaughton. It was made by Associated Talking Pictures, and includes the songs "Fanlight Fanny" and "Hitting the Highspots Now". The film is based on a novel by Joan Butler, and the sets were designed by art director Wilfred Shingleton.

Rene Ray, Countess of Midleton

Rene Ray, Countess of Midleton was a British stage and screen actress of the 1930s, 1940s and 1950s and also a novelist.

<i>The Over-the-Hill Gang Rides Again</i>

The Over-the-Hill Gang Rides Again starring Walter Brennan and Fred Astaire is a 1970 ABC Movie of the Week sequel to the Western comedy The Over-the-Hill Gang. The supporting cast includes Edgar Buchanan, Andy Devine, Chill Wills, Lana Wood, and Burt Mustin. Like the 1969 original, the sequel involves a group of aging Texas Rangers and was written by Richard Carr and directed by George McCowan.

Gordon Harker English film actor

William Gordon Harker was an English stage and film actor. He had a long career on the stage, from 1902 to the 1950s. One of the last plays he starred in was Small Hotel, a popular comedy he toured in 1955. In addition, he appeared in 68 films between 1921 and 1959, including three silent films directed by Alfred Hitchcock and in several scenes in Elstree Calling (1930), a revue film co-directed by Hitchcock. He was known for his performance as Inspector Hornleigh in a trilogy of films produced between 1938 and 1940, as well in Saloon Bar (1940), based on a stage play he had starred in and another one of his stage successes The Poltergeist made into the film Things Happen at Night (1947), a poltergeist comedy he co-starred in with Alfred Drayton and Robertson Hare. His last major screen role was as the wily waiter Albert in the 1957 motion picture version of Small Hotel

<i>Meet Mr. Lucifer</i>

Meet Mr. Lucifer is a black and white British comedy satire film released in 1953 starring Stanley Holloway. It was filmed at Ealing Studios, London, and is one of the Ealing Comedies. The film is based on the play Beggar My Neighbour by Arnold Ridley. The film opened on 26 November 1953 at the Haymarket Gaumont cinema in London.

<i>The Magnet</i> (film) 1950 film by Charles Frend

The Magnet is a 1950 Ealing Studios comedy film featuring Stephen Murray, Kay Walsh and in his first starring role James Fox. The story involves a young Wallasey boy, Johnny Brent (Fox), who obtains the eponymous magnet by deception, leading to much confusion. When he is acclaimed as a hero, he is shamed by his own sense of guilt.

Walter Forde was a British actor, screenwriter and director. Born in Lambeth, south London in 1898, he directed over fifty films between 1919 from the silent era through to 1949 in the sound era. He died in Los Angeles, California in 1984.

<i>Under Your Hat</i>

Under Your Hat is a 1940 British musical comedy spy film directed by Maurice Elvey and starring Jack Hulbert, Cicely Courtneidge and Austin Trevor.

The Lucky Number is a 1933 British sports comedy film directed by Anthony Asquith and starring Clifford Mollison, Gordon Harker, Joan Wyndham and Frank Pettingell. The screenplay concerns a professional footballer who attempts to recover a winning pools ticket. The film was made by Gainsborough Pictures and shot at Islington and Welwyn Studios with sets designed by Alex Vetchinsky. The football scenes were filmed in and around Highbury Stadium in North London.

Milton Rosmer British actor

Milton Rosmer was a British actor, film director and screenwriter. He made his screen debut in The Mystery of a Hansom Cab (1915) and continued to act in theatre, film and television until 1956. In 1926 he directed his first film The Woman Juror and went on to direct another 16 films between 1926 and 1938.

Roddy Hughes Welsh actor

Rhodri Henry "Roddy" Hughes was a Welsh theatre, film and television actor, who appeared in over 80 films between 1932 and 1961.

Aubrey Dexter

Aubrey Dexter (1898–1958) was a British stage and film actor.

Hard Steel is a 1942 British drama film directed by Norman Walker and starring Wilfrid Lawson, Betty Stockfeld and John Stuart. It was based on the novel Steel Saraband by Roger Dataller. The film was one of four made by G.H.W. Productions backed by the Rank Organisation. The film follows the rise of an ambitious steel worker as he is appointed to run his local steel mill. He soon outrages the employees with his ruthless behaviour - and his negligence leads to the accidental death of one of the workers. As the Second World War breaks out he realises what he has become, and seeks a chance of redemption.

Cheer Up is a 1936 British comedy film directed by Leo Mittler and starring Stanley Lupino, Sally Gray and Roddy Hughes. It was made at Ealing Studios by Lupino's own independent production company. An impoverished team of composer and songwriter try to secure financial backing for their new musical, with the assistance of a struggling actress working as a housemaid.

Ray Pitt was a British film editor who spent much of his career at Ealing Studios working on films such as the George Formby comedy vehicles Come On George! (1939) and Spare a Copper (1940) as well as on more serious productions such as the Second World War film Convoy (1940). He later worked at Hammer Films.

Saloon Bar is a 1939 British crime drama play written by Frank Harvey. It ran for a hundred and eighty performances at Wyndham's Theatre in London. The original cast included Gordon Harker, Mervyn Johns and Anna Konstam. It marked Margaret Johnston's West End debut. The regulars at a London pub attempt to prove that a man is about to be wrongly hanged for murder.

References

  1. Murphy p.209-210
  2. "Production of Saloon Bar | Theatricalia". theatricalia.com.
  3. "Saloon Bar". British Film Institute. Archived from the original on 14 January 2009. Retrieved 20 April 2014.
Bibliography