Inspector Hornleigh Goes To It

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Inspector Hornleigh Goes to It
Inspector Hornleigh Goes To It.jpg
Directed by Walter Forde
Written by
Produced by Edward Black (producer)
Starring
Cinematography
Edited by R. E. Dearing
Music by
Release date
  • 5 May 1941 (1941-05-05)(UK)
Running time
87 minutes
CountryUnited Kingdom
LanguageEnglish

Inspector Hornleigh Goes To It is a 1941 British detective film directed by Walter Forde and starring Gordon Harker, Alastair Sim, Phyllis Calvert and Edward Chapman. It was the third and final film adaptation of the Inspector Hornleigh stories.

Contents

It was released in America by 20th-Century Fox under the title Mail Train.

Plot summary

Hornleigh and Sergeant Bingham join the army in an effort to uncover a ring of German spies. [1]

Cast

Soundtrack

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References

  1. "Inspector Hornleigh Goes To It". British Film Institute. Archived from the original on 13 January 2009. Retrieved 20 April 2014.