The Woman Between (1931 British film)

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The Woman Between
Directed by Miles Mander
Written byMiles Mander (screenplay)
Frank Launder, based on the play "Conflict," by Miles Malleson
Produced by John Maxwell
Starring Owen Nares
Adrianne Allen
David Hawthorne
Cinematography Heinrich Gartner
Edited by Walter Stokvis
Production
company
Distributed by Wardour Films
Release date
22 January 1931
Running time
89 minutes
CountryUnited Kingdom
LanguageEnglish

The Woman Between is a 1931 British drama film directed by Miles Mander and starring Owen Nares, Adrianne Allen and David Hawthorne. It was made at Elstree Studios by British International Pictures, the leading studio of the era. [1] Mander adapted the film from Miles Malleson's 1925 play Conflict. The film is notable for its sexual and political content which has been attributed to a brief period of relaxation in oversight by the BBFC. It was one three similarly themed films which Allen appeared in at the time including Loose Ends and The Stronger Sex . [2]

Contents

Premise

An aristocratic young woman becomes romantically torn between two men, once friends at University, who stand for the Conservative Party and Labour Party in an election. Both have murky recent pasts, one having been a petty thief and the other had lived outside of marriage with the heroine. Her father is left bemused by the morals of the younger generation.

Cast

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References

  1. Wood p.70
  2. The Unknown Thirties. p.219-36

Bibliography

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