For the Love of Mike (1932 film)

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For the Love of Mike
Directed by Monty Banks
Written by H.F. Maltby (play)
Clifford Grey
Frank Launder
Produced by Walter C. Mycroft
Starring Bobby Howes
Constance Shotter
Arthur Riscoe
Cinematography Claude Friese-Greene
Production
company
Distributed by Wardour Films
Release date
December 1932
Running time
85 minutes
CountryUnited Kingdom
Language English

For the Love of Mike is a 1932 British musical comedy film directed by Monty Banks and starring Bobby Howes, Constance Shotter and Arthur Riscoe. It was made at Elstree Studios by British International Pictures. [1] The film's sets were designed by the art director David Rawnsley.

Contents

Plot

A private secretary begins to suspect that his nouveau riche employer is cheating his young female ward out of her inheritance, but inadvertently becomes involved in a plan to rob his master's safe.

Cast

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References

  1. Wood p.74

Bibliography