After Office Hours (1932 film)

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After Office Hours
"After Office Hours" (1932).jpg
Directed by Thomas Bentley
Written byThomas Bentley
Frank Launder
Based on London Wall
by John Van Druten
Starring Frank Lawton
Heather Angel
Viola Lyel
Garry Marsh
Cinematography Ernest Palmer
Edited byJohn Neill Brown
Music by John Greenwood
Production
company
Distributed by Wardour Films
Release dates
  • 30 June 1932 (1932-06-30)(London)
  • 24 October 1932 (1932-10-24)(United Kingdom)
Running time
78 minutes
CountryUnited Kingdom
LanguageEnglish

After Office Hours is a 1932 British romantic drama film directed by Thomas Bentley and starring Frank Lawton, Viola Lyel and Garry Marsh. [1]

Contents

The film was based on the 1931 play London Wall by John Van Druten with several of the cast reprising their roles from the original stage production. The film was produced by the British film studio British International Pictures at their Elstree Studios. [2]

Premise

Office romance, in which Hec is in love with secretary Pat, and fellow secretary Miss Janus, older and wiser, takes it upon herself to concoct a plan to help him receive the empty-headed Pat's affections. [3]

Cast

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References

  1. BFI.org
  2. "Elstree Studios". Archived from the original on 22 January 2015. Retrieved 27 December 2014.
  3. "After Office Hours (1932) - Thomas Bentley | Synopsis, Characteristics, Moods, Themes and Related | AllMovie".