The Scotland Yard Mystery

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The Scotland Yard Mystery
Directed by Thomas Bentley
Screenplay by
Produced by Walter C. Mycroft
Starring
Cinematography James Wilson
Edited by Walter Stokvis
Production
company
Distributed by Wardour Films
Release date
January 1934
Running time
76 minutes
CountryUnited Kingdom
LanguageEnglish

The Scotland Yard Mystery is a 1934 British crime film directed by Thomas Bentley and starring Sir Gerald du Maurier, George Curzon, Grete Natzler, Belle Chrystall and Wally Patch. The screenplay concerns a criminal doctor who operates a racket claiming life insurance by injecting victims with a life suspending serum turning them into living dead. [1] The film is based on a play by Wallace Geoffrey. It was made by one of the biggest British companies of the era, British International Pictures, at their Welwyn Studios. [2]

Contents

Plot summary

Cast

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References

  1. BFI.org
  2. Wood, Linda (2009) [1st pub. 1986]. British Films 1927 - 1939 (PDF). London: BFI Library Services. p. 69. Retrieved 30 December 2021.