The Adventures of Mr. Pickwick

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The Adventures of Mr. Pickwick
Directed by Thomas Bentley
Written by Charles Dickens (novel)
G. A. Baughan
Eliot Stannard
Starring Frederick Volpe
Mary Brough
Bransby Williams
Ernest Thesiger
Production
company
Distributed byIdeal Film Company
Release date
  • November 1921 (1921-11)
CountryUnited Kingdom
LanguageSilent

The Adventures of Mr. Pickwick is a 1921 British silent comedy film directed by Thomas Bentley based on the 1837 novel The Pickwick Papers by Charles Dickens. [1] As of August 2010, the film is missing from the BFI National Archive, and is listed as one of the British Film Institute's "75 Most Wanted" lost films. [2]

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References

  1. "The Adventures of Mr. Pickwick". Silent Era. Retrieved 9 February 2021.
  2. "The Adventures of Mr. Pickwick - 75 Most Wanted". BFI National Archives. Archived from the original on 3 August 2012. Retrieved 11 August 2010.