Happy (1933 film)

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Happy
Directed by Frederic Zelnik
Produced by Frederic Zelnik
Written byAustin Melford, Stanley Lupino, Frank Launder, Jaques Bachrach, Alfred Halm and Károly Nóti (Adaptation, Dialogue and Scenario)
Starring
Production
company
British International Pictures Ltd.
Distributed byWardour Films Ltd. (UK)
B.I.P. Export Ltd (Foreign Rights)
Running time
76 minutes
CountryUnited Kingdom
LanguageEnglish

Happy is a 1933 British musical film directed by Frederic Zelnik, starring Stanley Lupino, Dorothy Hyson, Laddie Cliff, and Will Fyffe. [1] The plot concerns a band leader who pretends to be a millionaire in Paris.

Contents

Cast

Songs

Happy features the following songs:

Critical response

Hal Erickson gave the picture a generally favourable review in The New York Times, proclaiming it to be Too expensive for a "quota quickie" but not quite costly enough to qualify as an "A" picture, Happy is a shapeless but generally satisfying vehicle for several of England's top music-hall attractions. [2]

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References

  1. "Happy (film)". Ftvdb.bfi.org.uk. 16 April 2009. Archived from the original on 21 October 2012. Retrieved 20 February 2012.
  2. https://www.nytimes.com/movies/movie/94286/Happy/overview