Keep Your Seats, Please

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Keep Your Seats, Please
"Keep Your Seats, Please" (1936).jpg
Directed by Monty Banks
Produced by Basil Dean
Written by Ilya Ilf (novel)
Yevgeny Petrov (novel)
Anthony Kimmins
Thomas J. Geraghty
Ian Hay
Starring George Formby
Florence Desmond
Alastair Sim
Gus McNaughton
Binkie Stuart
Music by Ernest Irving
CinematographyJohn W. Boyle
Edited by Jack Kitchin
Production
company
Distributed by ABFD
Release date
1 August 1936
Running time
82 minutes
CountryUnited Kingdom
LanguageEnglish

Keep Your Seats, Please is a 1936 British comedy film directed by Monty Banks and starring George Formby, Florence Desmond and Alastair Sim. It marked the film debut of the child star Binkie Stuart. The film was made by Associated Talking Pictures. [1]

Contents

The film follows a farcical plot based on the 1928 Russian satirical novel The Twelve Chairs by Ilya Ilf and Yevgeni Petrov. The film features Formby's signature tune, "When I'm Cleaning Windows".

Plot

George Withers learns he is supposed to inherit some valuable jewels from his aunt, and enlists the aid of his dubious lawyer to ensure he gets them. It transpires the stones are hidden in the lining of one of six antique chairs, and his aunt has left instructions for her nephew to purchase the chairs at auction. But unfortunately they are sold separately, as he arrives too late to bid. [2] [3]

Cast

Critical references

Sky Movies wrote, "Formby's on form - especially singing 'Keep Your Seats, Please' and 'When I'm Cleaning Windows' - Florence Desmond's a much stronger leading lady that George usually had, and Alastair Sim made one of his first major impacts in films as the unscrupulous lawyer who also has his beady eye on the hidden fortune". [4]

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References

  1. Wood p. 91
  2. "Keep Your Seats, Please! | BFI | BFI". Explore.bfi.org.uk. Archived from the original on 13 July 2012. Retrieved 10 March 2014.
  3. "Keep Your Seats Please (1936) - Trailers, Reviews, Synopsis, Showtimes and Cast". AllMovie. Retrieved 10 March 2014.
  4. "Keep Your Seats, Please - Sky Movies HD". Skymovies.sky.com. 23 May 2002. Retrieved 10 March 2014.

Bibliography

Keep Your Seats, Please on IMDb