St Mary's Church, Thornham Parva

Last updated
Church of St Mary
Thornham Parva - Church of St Mary.jpg
Location Eye, Suffolk
CountryEngland
Denomination Church of England
Previous denomination Roman Catholic
History
StatusActive
Architecture
Functional status Parish church
Heritage designation Grade I listed

St Mary's Church is a medieval church in Thornham Parva, Suffolk, England. Much of the fabric dates from the 12th century,and it is a Grade I listed building. [1] Originally the church served not only Thornham Parva but the neighbouring village of Thornham Magna, which is now a separate parish.

Thornham Parva village in the United Kingdom

Thornham Parva is a village and civil parish in the Mid Suffolk district of Suffolk in eastern England. Located to the north of sister village Thornham Magna and around five miles south of Diss, in 2005 its population was 50. By the time of the 2011 Census populations of less than 100 were not maintained separately and this village was included in the population of Thornham Magna.

Suffolk County of England

Suffolk is an East Anglian county of historic origin in England. It has borders with Norfolk to the north, Cambridgeshire to the west and Essex to the south. The North Sea lies to the east. The county town is Ipswich; other important towns include Lowestoft, Bury St Edmunds, Newmarket and Felixstowe, one of the largest container ports in Europe.

Thornham Magna village in United Kingdom

Thornham Magna is the sister village of Thornham Parva, about 3.5 miles (5.6 km) from Eye, Suffolk and close to the A140 main road from Norwich to Ipswich, the county towns of Norfolk and Suffolk.

A church on the site was recorded in the Domesday Book of 1086, and there are still traces of Anglo-Saxon stonework in the present building. The roof is thatched. Inside the building are early-14th-century wall paintings—on the south wall the early years of Christ and on the north wall the martyrdom of St Edmund. [2] The church also houses a famous altarpiece, the Thornham Parva Retable, which is thought to have been created in the 1330s for a Dominican priory. [3] [4]

Domesday Book 11th-century survey of landholding in England as well as the surviving manuscripts of the survey

Domesday Book is a manuscript record of the "Great Survey" of much of England and parts of Wales completed in 1086 by order of King William the Conqueror. The Anglo-Saxon Chronicle states:

Then, at the midwinter [1085], was the king in Gloucester with his council .... After this had the king a large meeting, and very deep consultation with his council, about this land; how it was occupied, and by what sort of men. Then sent he his men over all England into each shire; commissioning them to find out "How many hundreds of hides were in the shire, what land the king himself had, and what stock upon the land; or, what dues he ought to have by the year from the shire."

Anglo-Saxon architecture architectural style

Anglo-Saxon architecture was a period in the history of architecture in England, and parts of Wales, from the mid-5th century until the Norman Conquest of 1066. Anglo-Saxon secular buildings in Britain were generally simple, constructed mainly using timber with thatch for roofing. No universally accepted example survives above ground.

Altarpiece Artwork (painting, sculpture or relief) behind the altar

An altarpiece is an artwork such as a painting, sculpture or relief representing a religious subject made for placing behind the altar of a Christian church. Though most commonly used for a single work of art such as a painting or sculpture, or a set of them, the word can also be used of the whole ensemble behind an altar, otherwise known as a reredos, including what is often an elaborate frame for the central image or images. Altarpieces were one of the most important products of Christian art especially from the late Middle Ages to the era of the Counter-Reformation.

Architect Basil Spence died in 1976 at his home at Yaxley, Suffolk, and was buried at Thornham Parva. [5]

Basil Spence Scottish architect

Sir Basil Urwin Spence, OM, OBE, RA was a Scottish architect, most notably associated with Coventry Cathedral in England and the Beehive in New Zealand, but also responsible for numerous other buildings in the Modernist/Brutalist style.

Yaxley, Suffolk human settlement in United Kingdom

Yaxley is a small village just west of Eye in Suffolk, England. The name means 'cuckoo-clearing'.

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St Mary the Virgins Church, Stonham Parva Church in Suffolk, England

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St Marys Church, Sandwich Church in Kent, England

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Thornham Parva Retable

The Thornham Parva Retable is a 15 feet (4.6 m) long medieval altarpiece, now in Thornham Parva, Suffolk, England. The retable is thought to have been created in the 1330s for a Dominican Priory. It is the largest surviving altarpiece from the English Middle Ages.

References

  1. Historic England, "Church of St Mary, Thornham Parva (1285113)", National Heritage List for England , retrieved 2017-11-04
  2. "Suffolk Churches". suffolkchurches.co.uk. Retrieved 2017-11-04.
  3. "Altarpiece restored". Yorkshire Post.
  4. "The Hamilton Kerr Institute in Cambridge has restored a 15-ft long medieval altarpiece", History Today , 2003.
  5. "SPENCE, Sir Basil (1907-1976)". English Heritage. Retrieved 2017-11-03.

Coordinates: 52°18′41″N1°05′33″E / 52.3114°N 1.0926°E / 52.3114; 1.0926

Geographic coordinate system Coordinate system

A geographic coordinate system is a coordinate system that enables every location on Earth to be specified by a set of numbers, letters or symbols. The coordinates are often chosen such that one of the numbers represents a vertical position and two or three of the numbers represent a horizontal position; alternatively, a geographic position may be expressed in a combined three-dimensional Cartesian vector. A common choice of coordinates is latitude, longitude and elevation. To specify a location on a plane requires a map projection.