Steve Stricker

Last updated
Steve Stricker
Steve Stricker.jpg
Stricker in 2011
Personal information
Full nameSteven Charles Stricker
NicknameMr. September, Strick
Born (1967-02-23) February 23, 1967 (age 53)
Edgerton, Wisconsin
Height6 ft 0 in (1.83 m)
Weight190 lb (86 kg; 14 st)
NationalityFlag of the United States.svg  United States
Residence Madison, Wisconsin, U.S.
SpouseNicki Tiziani (m. 1993)
Children2
Career
College University of Illinois
Turned professional1990
Current tour(s) PGA Tour (joined 1994)
PGA Tour Champions (joined 2017)
Professional wins28
Highest ranking 2 (September 6, 2009) [1]
Number of wins by tour
PGA Tour12
European Tour1
PGA Tour Champions5
Other11
Best results in major championships
Masters Tournament T6: 2009
PGA Championship 2nd: 1998
U.S. Open 5th/T5: 1998, 1999
The Open Championship 4th: 2016
Achievements and awards
PGA Tour Comeback
Player of the Year
2006, 2007
Payne Stewart Award 2012
Byron Nelson Award 2013

Steven Charles Stricker (born February 23, 1967) is an American professional golfer who plays on the PGA Tour and the PGA Tour Champions. He has twelve victories on the PGA Tour, including the WGC-Match Play title in 2001 and two FedEx Cup playoff events. His most successful season on tour came at age 42 in 2009, with three victories and a runner-up finish on the money list. Stricker spent over 250 weeks in the top-10 of the Official World Golf Ranking, [2] reaching a career-high world ranking of No. 2 in September 2009. Stricker will serve as U.S. Ryder Cup captain for the 2021 matches, set for Whistling Straits in his home state of Wisconsin.

Contents

Early life

Born in Edgerton, Wisconsin, Stricker grew up playing golf at both Lake Ripley Country Club in nearby Cambridge and at the Edgerton Towne Country Club in Edgerton. A 1990 graduate of the University of Illinois, Stricker earned All-American honors as a member of the Illini golf team in 1988 and 1989. [3] [4]

Professional career

Stricker turned professional in 1990 and began his career on the Canadian Professional Golf Tour, [3] where he won two tournaments. He joined the PGA Tour in 1994, and his first success at the top level came in 1996, when Stricker notched two victories (Kemper Open, Motorola Western Open) and seven top ten finishes on his way to finishing fourth on the 1996 PGA Tour money list. [5]

In 1998, Stricker played himself into contention in the final round of the PGA Championship at Sahalee Country Club near Seattle. Thanks to a back-nine surge, PGA Tour veteran Vijay Singh bested Stricker down the stretch and claimed a two-stroke victory. This runner-up finish remains Stricker's best result in a major championship to date. Stricker has finished inside the top-20 six times at the U.S. Open, with his best finish a fifth-place in 1999 at Pinehurst No. 2. He won his third and most prestigious PGA Tour title at the WGC Match Play Championship in 2001, where he defeated Pierre Fulke 2 and 1 in Australia, to earn the $1,000,000 prize. This remains as the only time that the WGC Match Play Championship was played outside of the United States. [6]

Stricker lost his tour card in 2004. At age 39 in 2006, relying on sponsor exemptions, he managed seven top-ten finishes and was voted the tour's Comeback Player of the Year. In 2007 he won his fourth PGA Tour title at The Barclays on August 26, ending an 11-year victory drought on American soil, although he had previously triumphed down in Australia in 2001. This run of success earned him a spot on the Presidents Cup team in 2007. [4]

After his victory at The Barclays, which was the first of the four FedEx Cup playoff events, Stricker reached No. 4 in the Official World Golf Ranking, his highest career ranking at that point. Stricker finished runner-up in the 2007 FedEx Cup Playoffs behind Tiger Woods, and was again selected as Comeback Player of the Year. He was also inducted into the Wisconsin State Golf Association Hall of Fame in 2007.

At the Mercedes Benz Championship, the opening event of the 2008 season, Stricker lost out in a play-off to Daniel Chopra. This result took Stricker to No. 3 in the Official World Golf Ranking, again at the time his highest ranking to date. [7]

At the Bob Hope Classic in January 2009, Stricker shot third and fourth round scores of 61 and 62, at the PGA West Palmer and Nicklaus courses, to set the 36-hole scoring record on the PGA Tour at 123, beating a record that Pat Perez had held for only two days. (This record fell in October when Troy Matteson shot 61-61=122 at the Frys.com Open.) His four-round total of 33-under-par in the five-round event also set the PGA Tour record for lowest score relative to par for 72 holes, exceeding Ernie Els' total of 31 under par in the 2003 Mercedes-Benz Championship at Kapalua. The third-round 61 was Stricker's best score on tour to that point, but a 77 in the final round dropped him into a tie for third. [5]

Stricker won his fifth PGA Tour title at Colonial in Texas at the end of May 2009, with a playoff win over Tim Clark and Steve Marino. The win was aided by a 60-foot (18 m) chip-in on the 71st hole. [8] He won again in July at the John Deere Classic in Silvis, Illinois. After the second round was rained-out on Friday, the field was forced to play 36 holes on Sunday. Stricker shot an afternoon round of 64, which included a hole-out wedge shot for eagle on the 6th hole, and by three strokes over runners-up Zach Johnson, Brandt Snedeker, and Brett Quigley. He also matched his career low round on tour with a second round of 61 (−10). [9]

Stricker's third win of 2009, and seventh overall, came in September at the Deutsche Bank Championship, the second of four playoff events. He began the final round tied with Retief Goosen and Sean O'Hair, and birdied the final hole to win the event by one stroke over Jason Dufner and Scott Verplank. It was Stricker's second FedEx Cup playoff win, a win that also vaulted him ahead of Tiger Woods to the top of the FedEx Cup standings and vaulted him to No. 2 in the Official World Golf Ranking, his highest ranking achieved during his career. [10] Stricker has been called "Mr. September" due to his success in the FedEx Cup playoffs, where he has never finished outside the top-25 in his first ten career starts. [5] [11]

In February 2010, Stricker won his eighth tour title at the Northern Trust Open with a 16-under-par 268 winning total. With this win at Riviera, he passed Phil Mickelson and regained his ranking as World No. 2. [12]

In July, Stricker shot a career-low 60 (−11) in the first round of the John Deere Classic. [13] However, a 59 shot by Paul Goydos incredibly put him one stroke back of the lead. He followed with rounds of 66 and 62, for a total of 188, to set a tour 54-hole scoring record. [14] He then shot 70 on Sunday to win his ninth PGA Tour win, two strokes ahead of Goydos.

In June 2011, Stricker won at the Memorial Tournament in Ohio, his tenth tour title. [15] He opened with 68 and bettered this with 67 in the second round. However, this was made special by the hole-in-one he recorded at the par three 8th hole to hold a three stroke advantage at the halfway stage. Remarkably, he then opened round three with two eagles in the first five holes to open up a six-shot lead midway through round three, but some uncharacteristic mistakes on the back nine saw him fall back towards the rest of the field. He held on to the 36-hole lead to eventually win by one stroke over runners-up Matt Kuchar and Brandt Jobe. With this victory, Stricker became the highest-ranked American in the Official World Golf Ranking, at fourth in the world. For the first time in his career, 44-year-old Stricker was ranked higher than all other American golfers, including Tiger Woods and Phil Mickelson. Stricker played the tournament at −20 for the front nine, a record by 6 shots, versus +4 for the back nine.

Stricker gained his eleventh tour win at the John Deere Classic in July, sinking a 30-foot (9 m) birdie putt at the 72nd hole, one stroke ahead of runner-up Kyle Stanley. In a commanding position throughout most of Sunday's round, Stricker bogeyed the 15th and 16th to fall two strokes behind Stanley. He then bounced back with a birdie on the par five 17th while Stanley made bogeyed the 18th. Stricker, tied for the lead at this point, drove into a fairway bunker off the tee and then played his second shot just over the back of the green, but holed the putt from the fringe for the victory. [16] This was Stricker's third straight victory at the John Deere Classic becoming just the 10th golfer since World War II to win a tournament three straight times. [16]

Stricker tied a major championship record with a 63 in the first round at the PGA Championship in 2011, and led by two shots. His next three days were 74-69-73, and he tied for twelfth. Stricker's career earnings are over $44 million through the end of the 2018–19 season, among the highest of those without a major title.

Stricker started the 2012 season with a win in the season-opening Tournament of Champions at Kapalua on Maui. He shot a ten-under 63 on day two and held the lead until the very end, three strokes ahead of runner-up Martin Laird. It was his twelfth PGA Tour title. [17] He missed the cut in May at The Players Championship, his first since the 2009 PGA Championship. It ended a streak of 49 consecutive cuts, which was the longest on tour. [18]

At the start of the 2013 season, Stricker announced he would cut his schedule "in half," hoping to play just "10 or 12" tournaments. [19] As the defending champion, he finished runner-up at the Hyundai Tournament of Champions despite suffering from a herniated disc. He then reached the quarterfinals at the WGC-Accenture Match Play Championship, his best performance since his victory in 2001. [5]

In 2017, Stricker joined the PGA Tour Champions. In his first event, the Tucson Conquistadores Classic, he finished one stroke behind Tom Lehman. Stricker asked the USGA for a special exemption to play in the 2017 U.S. Open held in his home state, but his request was denied. He eventually earned entry through a qualifying tournament in Memphis. Stricker was the captain of the victorious U.S. team in the 2017 Presidents Cup.

In March 2018, Stricker won his first event on the PGA Tour Champions, the Cologuard Classic by two strokes. He then won his second straight start at the Rapiscan Systems Classic in Saucier, Mississippi. In September 2018, he won the Sanford International tournament on the PGA Tour Champions.

In 2018, U.S. captain Jim Furyk named Stricker as a non-playing vice-captain for the 2018 Ryder Cup team. The U.S. lost 17 1/2 to 10 1/2 to the European team.

In 2019, Stricker won his first senior major championship at the Regions Tradition, claiming a six stroke win over the field. Then in June of the same year, Stricker won his second senior major at the U.S. Senior Open, again by six strokes over Jerry Kelly and David Toms. [20]

Personal

Stricker married into a golfing family. His father-in-law, Dennis Tiziani, and his brother-in-law, Mario Tiziani, both played on the PGA Tour. He and his wife, Nicki, have two children. Nicki is often her husband's caddie. [4]

Professional wins (28)

PGA Tour wins (12)

Legend
World Golf Championships (1)
FedEx Cup playoff events (2)
Other PGA Tour (9)
No.DateTournamentWinning scoreTo parMargin of
victory
Runner(s)-up
1May 26, 1996 Kemper Open 69-68-65-68=270−143 strokes Flag of the United States.svg Brad Faxon, Flag of the United States.svg Scott Hoch,
Flag of the United States.svg Mark O'Meara, Flag of New Zealand.svg Grant Waite
2Jul 7, 1996 Motorola Western Open 65-69-67-69=270−188 strokes Flag of the United States.svg Billy Andrade, Flag of the United States.svg Jay Don Blake
3Jan 7, 2001 WGC-Accenture Match Play Championship 2 & 1 Flag of Sweden.svg Pierre Fulke
4Aug 26, 2007 The Barclays 67-67-65-69=268−162 strokes Flag of South Korea.svg K. J. Choi
5May 31, 2009 Crowne Plaza Invitational at Colonial 63-63-69-68=263−17Playoff Flag of South Africa.svg Tim Clark, Flag of the United States.svg Steve Marino
6Jul 12, 2009 John Deere Classic 71-61-67-64=264−203 strokes Flag of the United States.svg Zach Johnson, Flag of the United States.svg Brett Quigley,
Flag of the United States.svg Brandt Snedeker
7Sep 7, 2009 Deutsche Bank Championship 63-72-65-67=267−171 stroke Flag of the United States.svg Jason Dufner, Flag of the United States.svg Scott Verplank
8Feb 7, 2010 Northern Trust Open 67-65-66-70=268−162 strokes Flag of England.svg Luke Donald
9Jul 11, 2010 John Deere Classic (2)60-66-62-70=258−262 strokes Flag of the United States.svg Paul Goydos
10Jun 5, 2011 Memorial Tournament 68-67-69-68=272−161 stroke Flag of the United States.svg Brandt Jobe, Flag of the United States.svg Matt Kuchar
11Jul 10, 2011 John Deere Classic (3)66-64-63-69=262−221 stroke Flag of the United States.svg Kyle Stanley
12Jan 9, 2012 Hyundai Tournament of Champions 68-63-69-69=269−233 strokes Flag of Scotland.svg Martin Laird

PGA Tour playoff record (1–1)

No.YearTournamentOpponent(s)Result
1 2008 Mercedes-Benz Championship Flag of Sweden.svg Daniel Chopra Lost to birdie on fourth extra hole
2 2009 Crowne Plaza Invitational at Colonial Flag of South Africa.svg Tim Clark, Flag of the United States.svg Steve Marino Won with birdie on second extra hole

Canadian Tour wins (2)

No.DateTournamentWinning scoreTo parMargin of
victory
Runner-up
1Jun 3, 1990 Payless-Pepsi Victoria Open 66-68-70-72=276−8Playoff Flag of the United States.svg Todd Hamilton
2Aug 29, 1993 Canadian PGA Championship 67-71-68-68=274−105 strokes Flag of the United States.svg John Restino

Other wins (9)

PGA Tour Champions wins (5)

Legend
PGA Tour Champions major championships (2)
Other PGA Tour Champions (3)
No.DateTournamentWinning scoreTo parMargin of
victory
Runner(s)-up
1Mar 4, 2018 Cologuard Classic 66-70-69=205−142 strokes Flag of the United States.svg Scott Dunlap, Flag of the United States.svg Jerry Kelly,
Flag of the United States.svg Gene Sauers
2Mar 25, 2018 Rapiscan Systems Classic 68-69-68=205−113 strokes Flag of the United States.svg Billy Andrade
3Sep 23, 2018 Sanford International 63-67-67=197−134 strokes Flag of the United States.svg Tim Petrovic, Flag of the United States.svg Jerry Smith
4May 13, 2019 Regions Tradition 68-64-70-68=270−186 strokes Flag of the United States.svg Billy Andrade, Flag of the United States.svg Paul Goydos,
Flag of the United States.svg David Toms
5Jun 30, 2019 U.S. Senior Open 62-64-66-69=261−196 strokes Flag of the United States.svg Jerry Kelly, Flag of the United States.svg David Toms

PGA Tour Champions playoff record (0–1)

No.YearTournamentOpponentsResult
1 2019 American Family Insurance Championship Flag of South Africa.svg Retief Goosen, Flag of the United States.svg Jerry Kelly Kelly won with birdie on third extra hole

Results in major championships

Results not in chronological order in 2020.

Tournament1993199419951996199719981999
Masters Tournament CUTCUTT38
U.S. Open 83T13T60T36T55
The Open Championship T22T62T52CUT
PGA Championship T23T26CUT2CUT
Tournament2000200120022003200420052006200720082009
Masters Tournament T19T10CUTCUTCUTT6
U.S. Open T27CUTT16CUTT6T13T29T23
The Open Championship CUTT42T59T8T7T52
PGA Championship CUTT66CUTT7T23T39CUT
Tournament201020112012201320142015201620172018
Masters Tournament T30T11T47T20T31T28T16
U.S. Open T58T19T15T8T21T16T20
The Open Championship T55T12T234T37
PGA Championship T18T12T7T12T7T30T42T54
Tournament20192020
Masters Tournament
PGA Championship CUTCUT
U.S. Open CUT
The Open Championship NT
  Top 10
  Did not play

CUT = missed the half-way cut
"T" = tied
NT = No tournament due to COVID-19 pandemic

Summary

TournamentWins2nd3rdTop-5Top-10Top-25EventsCuts made
Masters Tournament 0000261611
PGA Championship 0101492215
U.S. Open 00024132219
The Open Championship 0001361513
Totals010413347558

Results in The Players Championship

Tournament1994199519961997199819992000200120022003200420052006200720082009
The Players Championship T23T11CUTCUTT51T6CUTCUTT19CUTCUTT52CUTT22
Tournament201020112012201320142015201620172018
The Players Championship T12CUTT37T13T38T41T23
  Top 10
  Did not play

CUT = missed the halfway cut
"T" indicates a tie for a place

World Golf Championships

Wins (1)

YearChampionship54 holesWinning scoreMarginRunner-up
2001 WGC-Accenture Match Play Championship n/a2 & 1 Flag of Sweden.svg Pierre Fulke

Results timeline

Tournament1999200020012002200320042005200620072008200920102011201220132014
Match Play R64R321R64R64R16R32R64R64R16QFR64
Championship NT1T35T6T13T16T18T8257
Invitational T41T43T6T914T213T63
Champions

1Cancelled due to 9/11

  Win
  Top 10
  Did not play

QF, R16, R32, R64 = Round in which player lost in match play
"T" = tied
NT = No tournament
Note that the HSBC Champions did not become a WGC event until 2009.

PGA Tour career summary

SeasonWinsEarnings ($)Rank [21]
199003,974255
199100n/a
199205,550261
1993046,171186
19940334,40950
19950438,93140
199621,383,7394
19970167,652130
199801,313,94813
19990662,46164
20000418,780113
200111,676,22930
20020789,71388
20030150,590188
20040440,906151
20050397,640162
200601,811,81134
200714,663,0774
200802,438,30422
200936,332,6362
201024,190,2355
201123,992,7858
201213,420,02118
201304,440,5327
201401,154,74789
20150269,701180
201601,418,64774
201701,002,036102
20180582,566147
20190135,670215
20200212,582187
Career*1244,296,04316 [22]

* As of the 2020 season.

Senior major championships

Wins (2)

YearChampionship54 holesWinning scoreMarginRunners-up
2019 Regions Tradition 4 shot lead−18 (68-64-70-68=270)6 strokes Flag of the United States.svg Billy Andrade, Flag of the United States.svg Paul Goydos, Flag of the United States.svg David Toms
2019 U.S. Senior Open 6 shot lead−19 (62-64-66-69=261)6 strokes Flag of the United States.svg Jerry Kelly, Flag of the United States.svg David Toms

Senior results timeline

Tournament2017201820192020
The Tradition T13T21NT
Senior PGA Championship T41NT
U.S. Senior Open 1NT
Senior Players Championship 6T23
The Senior Open Championship NT
  Win
  Top 10
  Did not play

"T" indicates a tie for a place
NT = No tournament due to COVID-19 pandemic

PGA Tour Champions career summary

SeasonStartsCuts
made
Wins
(majors)
2nd3rdTop-10Top-25Best
finish
Earnings
($)
Money
list rank
2017 66013562569,25037 [23]
2018 773217711,196,23513 [24]
2019 992 (2)106711,534,3278 [25]
Career*22225 (2)44182013,299,812139 [26]

*As of end of 2019 season

U.S. national team appearances

Professional

See also

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