Taehongdan County

Last updated
Taehongdan County
대홍단군
County
Korean transcription(s)
   Chosŏn'gŭl
   Hancha
   McCune-Reischauer Taehongdan-gun
   Revised Romanization Daehongdan-gun
DPRK2006 Ryanggang-Taehongdan.PNG
Map of Ryanggang showing the location of Taehongdan
Country North Korea
Province Ryanggang
Administrative divisions 1 ŭp, 9 workers' districts
Area
  Total680.9 km2 (262.9 sq mi)
Population (1991(est.))
  Total32,600
  Density48/km2 (120/sq mi)

Taehongdan County is a kun, or county, in Ryanggang province, North Korea. It was originally part of Musan County.

Administrative divisions of North Korea

The administrative divisions of North Korea are organized into three hierarchical levels. These divisions were discovered in 2002. Many of the units have equivalents in the system of South Korea. At the highest level are nine provinces, two directly governed cities, and three special administrative divisions. The second-level divisions are cities, counties, wards, and districts. These are further subdivided into third-level entities: towns, neighborhoods, villages, and workers' districts.

Ryanggang Province Province in Kwannam, North Korea

Ryanggang Province is a province in North Korea. The province is bordered by China (Jilin) on the north, North Hamgyong on the east, South Hamgyong on the south, and Chagang on the west. Ryanggang was formed in 1954, when it was separated from South Hamgyŏng. The provincial capital is Hyesan. In South Korean usage, "Ryanggang" is spelled and pronounced as "Yanggang"

North Korea Sovereign state in East Asia

North Korea, officially the Democratic People's Republic of Korea, is a country in East Asia constituting the northern part of the Korean Peninsula, with Pyongyang the capital and the largest city in the country. The name Korea is derived from Goguryeo which was one of the great powers in East Asia during its time, ruling most of the Korean Peninsula, Manchuria, parts of the Russian Far East and Inner Mongolia, under Gwanggaeto the Great. To the north and northwest, the country is bordered by China and by Russia along the Amnok and Tumen rivers; it is bordered to the south by South Korea, with the heavily fortified Korean Demilitarized Zone (DMZ) separating the two. Nevertheless, North Korea, like its southern counterpart, claims to be the legitimate government of the entire peninsula and adjacent islands.

Contents

The Taehongdan Revolutionary Battle Site there commemorates battles waged by Kim Il-sung in the area during the anti-Japanese struggle. [1]

Kim Il-sung President of the Democratic Peoples Republic of Korea

Kim Il-sung was the first leader of North Korea which he ruled from the country's establishment in 1948 until his death in 1994. He held the posts of Premier from 1948 to 1972 and President from 1972 to 1994. He was also the leader of the Workers' Party of Korea (WPK) from 1949 to 1994. Coming to power after the end of Japanese rule in 1945, he authorized the invasion of South Korea in 1950, triggering an intervention in defense of South Korea by the United Nations led by the United States. Following the military stalemate in the Korean War, a ceasefire was signed on 27 July 1953. He was the second longest-serving non-royal head of state/government in the 20th century, in office for more than 48 years.

Geography

To the north, Taehongdan looks across the Tumen River at China. It stands on the northwest edge of the Paektu Plateau. The highest of its many peaks is Changchongsan (Chosŏn'gŭl : 장청산). The chief river is the Tumen. Some 91% of the county's area is taken up by forestland. Due to its inland location, Taehongdan has a continental climate with cold winters.

Tumen River river in China, Russia and North Korea

The Tumen River, also known as the Tuman or Duman River, is a 521-kilometre (324 mi) long river that serves as part of the boundary between China, North Korea and Russia, rising on the slopes of Mount Paektu and flowing into the East Sea. The river has a drainage basin of 33,800 km2.

Hangul Native alphabet of the Korean language

The Korean alphabet, known as Hangul, has been used to write the Korean language since its creation in the 15th century by King Sejong the Great. It may also be written as Hangeul following the standard Romanization.

Administrative divisions

Taehongdan county is divided into 1 ŭp (town) and 9 rodongjagu (workers' districts):

  • Taehongdan-ŭp (대홍단읍/大紅湍邑)
  • Hŭngam-rodongjagu (홍암로동자구/紅岩勞動者區)
  • Kaech'ŏl-lodongjagu (개척로동자구/開拓勞動者區)
  • Nongsa-rodongjagu (농사로동자구/農事勞動者區)
  • Sambong-rodongjagu (삼봉로동자구/三峰勞動者區)
  • Samjang-rodongjagu (삼장로동자구/三長勞動者區)
  • Sindŏng-rodongjagu (신덕로동자구/新德勞動者區)
  • Sinhŭng-rodongjagu (신흥로동자구/新興勞動者區)
  • Sŏdu-rodongjagu (서두로동자구/西頭勞動者區)
  • Yugong-rodongjagu (유곡로동자구/楡谷勞動者區)

Economy

Logging is an important local industry. Agriculture is also key, with the county leading the nation in potato production and also producing barley, wheat and soybeans. Livestock are also raised in the county, and there is some manufacturing.

Transportation

Taehongdan is served by roads, but not by rail.

See also

Geography of North Korea

North Korea is located in east Asia on the northern half of the Korean Peninsula.

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References

  1. "Taehongdan Revolutionary Battle Site". KCNA. 23 May 2011. Archived from the original on 12 October 2014.

Naenara is the official web portal of the North Korean government. The portal's categories include politics, tourism, music, foreign trade, arts, press, information technology, history, and "Korea is One".

Korean language Language spoken in Korea

The Korean language is an East Asian language spoken by about 80 million people. It is a member of the Koreanic language family and is the official and national language of both Koreas: North Korea and South Korea, with different standardized official forms used in each territory. It is also one of the two official languages in the Yanbian Korean Autonomous Prefecture and Changbai Korean Autonomous County of Jilin province, China. Historical and modern linguists classify Korean as a language isolate; however, it does have a few extinct relatives, which together with Korean itself and the Jeju language form the Koreanic language family. This implies that Korean is not an isolate, but a member of a micro-family. The idea that Korean belongs to the controversial Altaic language family is discredited in academic research. Korean is agglutinative in its morphology and SOV in its syntax.

Coordinates: 42°00′04″N128°51′05″E / 42.00111°N 128.85139°E / 42.00111; 128.85139