Provinces of North Korea

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North Korean Provinces
조선민주주의인민공화국의 도 (Korean)
Chosŏnminjujuŭiinmingonghwagukŭi to (Romanized)
Provinces of Korea (DPRK point of view)-en+Inter-Korean border.svg
Category Unitary State
Location Democratic People's Republic of Korea
Number16 (8 controlled by DPRK, 7 controlled by ROK & 1 split between DPRK and ROK)
Populations719,269 (Ryanggang Province) – 4,051,696 (South Pyongan)
Areas11,255 km2 (4,346 sq mi) (Kangwon) – 18,970 km2 (7,320 sq mi) (South Hamgyong) – 28,955 km2 (11,180 sq mi) (Kangwon including ROK controlled-parts)
Government
  • Single-Party Government
Subdivisions

Provinces are the first-level division within North Korea. There are 9 provinces in North Korea: Chagang, North Hamgyong, South Hamgyong, North Hwanghae, South Hwanghae, Kangwon, North Pyongan, South Pyongan, and Ryanggang.

Contents

History

Although the details of local administration have changed dramatically over time, the basic outline of the current three-tiered system was implemented under the reign of Gojong in 1895. A similar system also remains in use in South Korea.

A province (Korean : ; Hanja : ) are the highest-ranked administrative divisions in North Korea. Provinces have equal status to the special cities.

List of provinces

The populations listed for each province are from the 2008 North Korea Census. From this census, there are an additional 702,372 people living in military camps.

Name Chosŏn'gŭl Hancha ISO PopulationArea
(km2)
Density
(/km2)
Capital Region
Chagang 자강도慈江道KP-041,299,83016,76577.5 Kanggye Kwanso
North Hamgyong 함경북도咸鏡北道KP-092,327,36215,980145.6 Chongjin Kwanbuk
South Hamgyong 함경남도咸鏡南道KP-083,066,01318,534165.4 Hamhung Kwannam
North Hwanghae 황해북도黃海北道KP-062,113,6728,153.7259.2 Sariwon Haeso
South Hwanghae 황해남도黃海南道KP-052,310,4858,450.3273.4 Haeju Haeso
Kangwon 강원도江原道KP-071,477,58211,091133.2 Wonsan Kwandong
North Pyongan 평안북도平安北道KP-032,728,66212,680.3215.2 Sinuiju Kwanso
South Pyongan 평안남도平安南道KP-024,051,69611,890.6340.7 Pyongsong Kwanso
Ryanggang 량강도兩江道KP-10719,26913,88051.8 Hyesan Kwannam

Claimed provinces

North Korea claims seven provinces on the territory controlled by South Korea. While people's committees for these claimed provinces were elected in 1950 during the Korean War, no government-in-exile for them exists as of 2021. These provinces are based on the divisions of the Japanese era, but correspond somewhat to the present South Korean provinces and the special cities partitioned out of them, owing to the alterations in the provincial division effected by South Korea being more conservative relatively to those effected by the north.

Historical provinceName Chosŏn'gŭl Hancha CapitalEquivalent South Korean provinces
Ch'ungch'ŏng North Ch'ungch'ŏng 충청북도忠淸北道 Ch'ŏngju North Chungcheong Province
Sejong Special Self-Governing City (part)
Ch'ungch'ŏng South Ch'ungch'ŏng 충청남도忠淸南道 Taejŏn South Chungcheong Province
Daejeon Metropolitan City
Sejong Special Self-Governing City (part)
Kyŏnggi Kyŏnggi 경기도京畿道 Sŏul Gyeonggi Province (except parts of Pocheon and Yeoncheon County)
Seoul Special City
Incheon Metropolitan City
Kyŏngsang North Kyŏngsang 경상북도慶尙北道 Taegu North Gyeongsang (except Uljin County)
Daegu Metropolitan City
Kyŏngsang South Kyŏngsang 경상남도慶尙南道 Pusan South Gyeongsang Province
Busan Metropolitan City
Ulsan Metropolitan City
Chŏlla North Chŏlla 전라북도全羅北道 Chŏnju North Jeolla Province
Chŏlla South Chŏlla 전라남도全羅南道 Kwangju South Jeolla Province
Jeju Special Self-Governing Province
Gwangju Metropolitan City

See also

Related Research Articles

Korea's provinces have been the primary administrative division of Korea since the mid Goryeo dynasty in the early 11th century, and were preceded by provincial-level divisions dating back to Unified Silla, in the late 7th century.

Jeolla Province Historical province of Korea

Jeolla Province was one of the historical Eight Provinces of Korea during the Kingdom of Joseon in today Southwestern Korea. It consisted of the modern South Korean provinces of North Jeolla, South Jeolla and Gwangju Metropolitan City as well as the Jeju Province. The provincial capital was Jeonju, the current capital of North Jeolla. The entire inland region was called Honam, which is still commonly used today.

Eight Provinces of Korea Divisions of Korea during the Joseon Dynasty

During most of the Joseon Dynasty, Korea was divided into eight provinces. The eight provinces' boundaries remained unchanged for about 480 years from 1413 to 1895, and formed a geographic paradigm that is still reflected today in the Korean Peninsula's administrative divisions, dialects, and regional distinctions. The names of all eight provinces are still preserved today, in one form or another. These eight historical provinces form both North and South Korea, and are not to be confused with the current eight provinces that make up South Korea.

Kangwon Province (North Korea) Province of North Korea

Kangwon Province is a province of North Korea, with its capital at Wŏnsan. Before the division of Korea in 1945, Kangwŏn Province and its South Korean neighbour Gangwon Province formed a single province that excluded Wŏnsan.

North Pyongan Province Province of North Korea

North Pyongan Province, written before 1925 in English as Yeng Byen) is a western province of North Korea. The province was formed in 1896 from the northern half of the former P'yŏng'an Province, remained a province of Korea until 1945, then became a province of North Korea. Its capital is Sinŭiju. In 2002, Sinŭiju Special Administrative Region—near the city of Sinuiju—was established as a separately governed Special Administrative Region.

South Pyongan Province Province of North Korea

South Pyongan Province is a province of North Korea. The province was formed in 1896 from the southern half of the former Pyongan Province, remained a province of Korea until 1945, then became a province of North Korea. Its capital is Pyongsong.

South Hamgyong Province Province of North Korea

South Hamgyong Province is a province of North Korea. The province was formed in 1896 from the southern half of the former Hamgyong Province, remained a province of Korea until 1945, then became a province of North Korea. Its capital is Hamhung.

Ryanggang Province Province of North Korea

Ryanggang Province is a province in North Korea. The province is bordered by China (Jilin) on the north, North Hamgyong on the east, South Hamgyong on the south, and Chagang on the west. Ryanggang was formed in 1954, when it was separated from South Hamgyŏng. The provincial capital is Hyesan. In South Korean usage, "Ryanggang" is spelled and pronounced as "Yanggang"

Pyongan Province Historical province of Korea

Pyeong-an Province was one of Eight Provinces of Korea during the Joseon Dynasty. Pyeong'an was located in the northwest of Korea. The provincial capital was Pyeongyang.

Hamgyong Province Historical province of Korea

Hamgyong Province was one of the Eight Provinces of Korea during the Joseon Dynasty. Hamgyŏng was located in the northeast of Korea. The provincial capital was Hamhŭng.

Chagang Province Province of North Korea

Chagang Province is a province in North Korea; it is bordered by China's Jilin and Liaoning provinces to the north, Ryanggang and South Hamgyong to the east, South Pyongan to the south, and North Pyongan to the west. Chagang was formed in 1949, after being demarcated from North Pyongan. The provincial capital is Kanggye. Chagang is the only province of North Korea which is completely inaccessible to tourists, however in 2019 Manpo became accessible to tourist. One reason it was not believed to be accessible to tourist was due to the province being known for its weapons and nuclear weapon facilities and factories located within the province. In May 2018, the province became a "Special Songun Revolutionary Zone" in relations to concealing the nuclear weapon and weapon's factories within the province.

Korean dialects

A number of Korean dialects are spoken on the Korean Peninsula. The peninsula is extremely mountainous and each dialect's "territory" corresponds closely to the natural boundaries between different geographical regions of Korea. Most of the dialects are named for one of the traditional Eight Provinces of Korea. One is sufficiently distinct from the others to be considered a separate language, the Jeju language.

2006 North Korean floods

Flooding in North Korea in July 2006 caused extensive damage and loss of life, although reports differ about its extent.

Korean regional cuisines are characterized by local specialties and distinctive styles within Korean cuisine. The divisions reflected historical boundaries of the provinces where these food and culinary traditions were preserved until modern times.

2012 North Korean floods

The 2012 North Korean floods began in mid-July 2012 when Tropical Storm Khanun affected parts of the country, killing at least 88 people and leaving more than 62,000 people homeless. Torrential rains on 29 and 30 July 2012 worsened the situation, causing additional damage and casualties and forcing the government to request international assistance. Severe rainfall also affected the southern region of North Korea in August, killing at least six.

Hwanghae Province (Republic of Korea) Province in Republic of Korea

"Hwanghae Province" or "Hwanghae-do" is, according to South Korean law, a province of the Republic of Korea, as the South Korean government formally claims to be the legitimate government of whole of Korea. The area constituting the province is under the de facto jurisdiction of North Korea.

South Pyeongan Province (Republic of Korea) Province in Republic of Korea

"South Pyeongan Province" or "Pyeongannam-do" is, according to South Korean law, a province of the Republic of Korea, as the South Korean government formally claims to be the legitimate government of the whole of Korea. The area constituting the province is under the de facto jurisdiction of North Korea.

North Hamgyeong Province (Republic of Korea) Province in Republic of Korea

"North Hamgyeong Province" or "Hamgyeongbuk-do" is, according to South Korean law, a province of the Republic of Korea, as the South Korean government formally claims to be the legitimate government of whole of Korea. The area constituting the province is under the de facto jurisdiction of North Korea.

References