Teeth 'n' Smiles

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Teeth 'n' Smiles is a musical play written by David Hare.

Contents

Performances

The play was first performed at the Royal Court Theatre on 2 September 1975. [1]

It was subsequently revived at Wyndhams Theatre in May 1976 (directed by the playwright), at the Oxford Playhouse in October 1977 and at the Crucible Theatre in 2002.

Dramatis Personae and Casts

CharacterDescriptionPlayed by (1975)Played by (1976)Played by (1977)Played by (2002)
 Arthursongwriter Jack Shepherd Martin Shaw Frank GrimesScott Handy
 Inchroadie Karl Howman Karl HowmanPeter AttardNicholas Tennant
 Laurap.r. Cherie Lunghi Gay Hamilton Belinda Lang Lucy Briers
 Nashdrummer Rene Augustus Charlie GrimaStephen PriceJustin Pickett
 Wilsonkeyboard Mick Ford Mick FordKevin Elyot Zubin Varla
 Sneadporter Roger Hume Roland MacLeod Noel CollinsRobert Calvert
 Peyotebass guitar Hugh Fraser Hugh FraserDavid CardyKeith-Lee Castle
 Smegslead guitarAndrew DicksonAndrew DicksonLarry WhitehurstLance Burman
 Ansonstudent Antony Sher Antony Sher Peter WhitmanDominic Charles-Rouse
 Maggievocals Helen Mirren Helen Mirren Cheryl Kennedy Amanda Donohoe
 Saraffianmanager Dave King Dave KingPatrick O'Connell Ivan Kaye
 Randolphstar Heinz Heinz Tom Wilkinson William Maidwell
 TechniciantechnicianIan Elliott / David CharkhamDavid Cross / Kit ThackerSteve Morley

1975 cast. [2] 1976 cast. [3] 1977 cast. [4]

In a 1979 production in the USA, Maggie was played by Ellen Greene.

Plot

The play is set around the performances of a failing rock band fronted by lead singer Maggie Frisby at the May Ball on the night of 9 June 1969 at Jesus College, Cambridge.

Music

The songs in the play were written by Nick Bicât (music) and Tony Bicât (lyrics) and were -

[5]

Trivia

During the initial run at the Royal Court, Keith Moon turned up drunk at the stage door, joined Helen Mirren in her dressing room and told her how great the show was, and then tried to join the cast on stage before being stopped by the management. [6]

Helen Mirren's interpretation of Maggie was based on Janis Joplin. She said of the role at the time: “I’m very like Maggie in many ways, only she’s much more ballsy and gutsy than me. I endorse most of what Maggie says, in fact in many ways it’s difficult to talk about her because I feel so close to her.” [7]

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References

  1. Teeth 'n' Smiles Faber and Faber 1976 ISBN   0 571 10995 0
  2. Royal Court Theatre programme
  3. Wyndhams Theatre programme
  4. Oxford Playhouse programme
  5. Teeth 'n' Smiles Faber and Faber 1976 ISBN   0 571 10995 0
  6. Mirren, Helen (2007). In The Frame. Orion Books. ISBN   978-0-7538-2434-4.
  7. Ward, Philip (2019). Becoming Helen Mirren. Troubador. ISBN   9781838597146.