The Darling of Paris

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The Darling of Paris
The Darling of Paris.jpg
Directed by J. Gordon Edwards
Produced by William Fox
Written by Adrian Jackson (scenario)
Based on The Hunchback of Notre-Dame
by Victor Hugo
Starring Theda Bara
Glen White
Cinematography Phil Rosen
Distributed by Fox Film Corporation
Release date
  • January 22, 1917 (1917-01-22)
Running time
6 reels (1917 release)
5 reels (1919 re-release)
CountryUnited States
LanguageSilent
English intertitles

The Darling of Paris is a 1917 American silent romantic drama film directed by J. Gordon Edwards and starring Theda Bara and Glen White. It was a very loose film adaptation of the 1831 novel The Hunchback of Notre-Dame by Victor Hugo. It was produced by William Fox. The Darling of Paris was later re-edited from six to five reels and re-released by Fox on February 16, 1919. The film is now considered lost. [1]

Contents

Plot

The wealthy girl Esmeralda (Theda Bara) is kidnapped by gypsies at birth and becomes, as one might assume, the darling of Paris. She is loved by the bell ringer and former hunchback Quasimodo (Glen White), Frollo (Walter Law), the wicked surgeon who cares for him, and an equally wicked Captain Phoebus (Herbert Heyes).

However, the titular hunchback is downplayed in favor of gypsy dancing girl Esmerelda. The surgeon kills the Captain and frames Esmeralda, but after many merry mix-ups, she winds back with her wealthy family, happily wed to Quasimodo.

Cast

Theda Bara Esmeralda
Glen White Quasimodo
Walter Law Claude Frollo
Herbert Heyes Captain Phoebus
Carey Lee Paquette
John Webb Dillon Clopin Trouillefou
Louis Dean Pierre Gringoire
Alice Gale Gypsy Queen

Production notes

The film was shot at the Fox Studios then located in Fort Lee, New Jersey. An elaborate set was constructed on the back lot to recreate Paris where the film is set. The set also included a reproduction of the Notre Dame de Paris. [2]

Brazil

The release in Brazil was done with the title A Favorita de Paris in September 17, 1917 on the cinemas Ideal [3] and Pathé, both from Rua da Carioca 60-62, Rio de Janeiro. It also debuted on Cine Haddock Lobo in September 30, 1917. [4] Cinema Haddock Lobo was located near the Largo da Segunda-Feira, in a street of several theaters. Cine Ideal belonged to the group Severiano Ribeiro, which still holds in its storehouse old silent films. For over a month it grossed a huge box office and was a success of public and critical acclamation on Rio society.

The highest-grossing releases in September on Rio:

ReleaseCinemaFilmLeadingEnterprise
Sept. 17, 1917ODEONEm Casa Alheia ( A Kentucky Cinderella ) Ruth Clifford Bluebird Photoplays
Sept. 17, 1917PALAISImplacável Destino (The Gown of Destiny) Alma Rubens Triangle Film Corporation
Sept. 17, 1917PATHÉA Favorita de Paris (The Darling of Paris) Theda Bara Fox-Film
Sept. 17, 1917IDEALA Favorita de Paris (The Darling of Paris) Theda Bara Fox-Film
Sept. 17, 1917AVENIDAA Cruz da Vitória (The Victoria Cross) Lou Tellegen Jesse L. Lasky Feature Play Company
Sept. 10, 1917PARISIENSEOs Maridos da Divorciada (The Men She Married) Gail Kane, Montagu Love Peerless Productions
Sept. 03, 1917OLYMPIAPalermas e Malandrins (Haystacks and Steeples) Bobby Vernon, Gloria Swanson Keystone Film Company
Aug. 20, 1917VELOVítima da Tentação (Her Temptation) Gladys Brockwell Fox-Film
Aug. 20, 1917ESTRELLAPorta do Amor (A Love Case)Harry Depp Triangle Film Corporation
Aug. 13, 1917ÍRISJudex ( Judex ) René Cresté Société des Etablissements L. Gaumont

See also

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References

  1. "Silent Era: Darling of Paris". silentera. Retrieved 2012-10-10.
  2. Fort Lee: Birthplace of the Motion Picture Industry. Arcadia Publishing. 2006. p. 34. ISBN   0-738-54501-5.
  3. A FAVORITA DE PARIS (The Darling of Paris) Brazil release Cine Ideal: Sept. 17, 1917
  4. A FAVORITA DE PARIS (The Darling of Paris) Brazil release Cine Haddock Lobo: Sept. 30, 1917